texashuntingforum.com logo
Main Menu
Advertisement
Affiliates
Advertisement
Newest Members
laura1996, PT Hunter, TexasLandLender, PSEBEAST, Dakota Poston
65272 Registered Users
Top Posters(All Time)
dogcatcher 92,978
bill oxner 54,547
stxranchman 54,502
SnakeWrangler 45,563
RKHarm24 44,583
rifleman 44,430
BMD 41,029
Big Orn 37,484
txshntr 35,549
Facebook
Forum Statistics
Forums45
Topics430,436
Posts9,253,976
Members65,272
Most Online16,728
Mar 25th, 2012
Print Thread
Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD #265666
11/30/07 05:31 PM
11/30/07 05:31 PM
Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 13,478
Colleyville, DFW, TX
jeh7mmmag Offline OP
gramps
jeh7mmmag  Offline OP
gramps

Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 13,478
Colleyville, DFW, TX
*FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD
This post is pinned to help us bookmark common information and sites regarding Feral Hogs Regulation, Laws, Health warning, or Public information regarding Hogs. If you have any good sites or information please post them here. up cheers

*New Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) regulations for moving LIVE feral swine will go into effect October 1, 08.
http://www.tahc.state.tx.us/animal_health/swine/swine.html


The brochure also is posted on the TAHC web site at http://www.tahc.state.tx.us

*Regulations for Moving LIVE Wild Hogs.
http://www.tahc.state.tx.us/animal_health/swine/feral_swine.pdf



*TAHC: Regulations For Trapping or Moving Feral (Wild) Swine, Safety for Hunters,
http://www.tahc.state.tx.us/animal_health/sb_pr/feral_swine.pdf

*TAHC: Swine Diseases a Danger to Humans and Livestock.
web page
http://www.tahc.state.tx.us/animal_health/diseases/sb_pr/feral_swine.pdf


*TPWLD links:
http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/nuisance/feral_hogs/


*Trapping and Trap construction:
http://www.hpj.com/archives/2005/dec05/d...;0.545428953909
http://www.noble.org/Ag/Wildlife/FeralHogs/12-Trapping.htm
http://www.wilcoxwebworks.com/hs/hogtrapspermanent.htm
http://www.agfc.com/!userfiles/pdfs/hunting/hog_trap_flier_web.pdf

Box Traps for Feral Hogs
http://pcwp.tamu.edu/media/6632/L-5525-Box-Traps-for-Feral-Hogs.pdf

Feral Hog Corral Trap
http://www.agfc.com/species/Documents/hog_trap_flier_web.pdf
http://goliad.agrilife.org/files/2011/08/wexford_trap_3.pdf


Corral Traps for Capturing Feral Hogs Capture Techniques
•Recognizing Feral Hog Sign
•Snares (Learn how to build your own HERE)
•Box traps
•Corral traps
•Bait types (coming soon)
•Firearms
http://pcwp.tamu.edu/FeralHogs/CaptureTechniques.aspx



*Anatomy and kill zone:
http://www.texasboars.com/anatomy.html



*Processing:


*Salt Curing and Smoking Meats:
http://uga.edu/nchfp/publications/nchfp/lit_rev/cure_smoke_cure.html
http://www.mortonsalt.com/products/meatcuring/smokeflavor.html


*Cooking, prep, and sausage
http://www.sausagemaker.com/
http://www.askthemeatman.com/cooking_wild_boar.htm
http://www.lubbockonline.com/stories/022207/lif_022207030.shtml
http://bbq.about.com/od/barbecuehelp/a/aa061006a.htm
http://www.pig-hunt.com/id20.html
http://www.spitjack.com/page/SJ/CTGY/HOG?gclid=CPH8se_JjYkCFQRbFQodAylOAw
http://slemke.tripod.com/hog.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brining



*TAMU INFORMATION:
http://texnat.tamu.edu/symposia/feral/feral-6.htm
http://feralhogs.tamu.edu/trap.cfm
http://feralhogs.tamu.edu/bait.cfm
http://wildlife.tamu.edu/publications/tahcregulations4.pdf



*OTHER TRAPS:
http://www.dpi.qld.gov.au/documents/Biosecurity_EnvironmentalPests/IPA-Control-Feral-Pigs-PA7.pdf


*How much does your animal weigh?
http://ag.arizona.edu/backyards/articles/winter07/p11-12.pdf


Coping With Feral Hogs
http://feralhogs.tamu.edu/




Quote:
*LICENSE REQUIREMENT FOR FERAL HOGS 2009-2010 OUTDOORS ANNUAL*

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publications/annual/general/hunt_licenses/
A hunting license is required of any person, regardless of age, who hunts any animal, bird, frog or turtle in this state (except furbearers, if the hunter possesses a trapper's license). No license is required for nuisance fur-bearing animals, depredating hogs or coyotes (see below). Non-residents under 17 years of age may purchase and hunt with the Youth Hunting License (Type 169).

Exceptions: a hunting license is not required to hunt the following:

Coyotes, if the coyotes are attacking, about to attack, or have recently attacked livestock, domestic animals, or fowl.
Depredating feral hogs, if a landowner (resident or non-resident) or landowner's agent or lessee is taking feral hogs causing depredation on the landowner's land.
Fur-bearing animals, if the hunter possesses a trapper's license or if the fur-bearing animals are causing depredation.
XXXXX
XXXXX


A hunting license is required of any person, regardless of age, who hunts any animal, bird, frog or turtle in this state (except furbearers, if the hunter possesses a trapper's license).

Note: All laws and regulations governing hunter education still apply.

EXOTIC ANIMALS AND FOWL
Exotic animal refers to grass-eating or plant-eating, single-hoofed or cloven-hoofed mammals that are not indigenous or native to Texas and are known as ungulates, including animals from the deer and antelope families that landowners have introduced into this state. Includes, but is not limited to feral hog, Aoudad sheep, Axis deer, Elk, Sika deer, Fallow deer, Blackbuck antelope, Nilgai antelope, and Russian boar. Exotic fowl refers to any avian species that is not indigenous to this state, including ratites (emu, ostrich, rhea, cassowary, etc.).

There are no state bag or possession limits or closed seasons on exotic animals or fowl on private property. It is against the law to:
-Hunt an exotic without a valid hunting license.
-Hunt an exotic on a public road or right-of-way.
-Hunt an exotic without the landowner's permission.
-Possess an exotic or the carcass of an exotic without the owner's consent.

Penalty: A person who violates these laws commits an offense that is a Class A Parks and Wildlife Code misdemeanor ($500-$4000 and/or up to one year in jail).

Nongame and Other Species
NONGAME ANIMALS (Includes, but is not limited to the following):
Armadillos*
Bobcats*
Coyotes*
Flying squirrels
Frogs
Ground squirrels
Mountain lions
Porcupines
Prairie dogs
Rabbits
Turtles
Does not include feral hog (see Exotic Animals and Fowl).
No closed season. These animals may be hunted at any time by any lawful means or methods on private property. Public hunting lands may have restrictions. A hunting license is required.


Quote:

License Requirement:
Feral Hog Laws and Regulations in Texas
http://pcwp.tamu.edu/media/7025/feral-hog-laws-and-regulations-in-texas.pdf




Quote:

New feral hog publications aim to help landowners thwart growing menace
February 18, 2010
Writer(s):
Steve Byrns, 325-653-4576,s-byrns@tamu.edu

Contact(s):Dr. Jim Cathey, 979-845-2862, jccathey@tamu.edu

COLLEGE STATION – The Texas AgriLife Extension Service has developed five new feral hog control publications to help landowners corral this growing menace, according to an AgriLife Extension specialist.

These publications were funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through a Clean Water Act § 319(h) nonpoint source grant. Publications are available online at: http://plumcreek.tamu.edu/feralhogs/ .

These publications specifically target the Plum Creek Watershed in Hays and Caldwell counties, an area especially hard hit by the marauders, but are applicable wherever feral hogs are a problem, said Dr. Jim Cathey, AgriLife Extension wildlife specialist at College Station.

Chancey Lewis, AgriLife Extension wildlife assistant at Lockhart and his colleagues developed the new publications. Lewis works closely with landowners in Hays and Caldwell counties, giving instruction and technical guidance on hog trapping, as part of the implementation of the Plum Creek Watershed Protection Plan.

The five publications are:

– “Recognizing Feral Hog Sign,” deals with the evidence or sign the hogs leave in passing. By being able to read sign, Cathey said landowners can learn where the animals are traveling and apply the appropriate management technique to reduce their numbers.

– “Corral Traps for Capturing Feral Hogs,” discusses large traps that Cathey said have proven useful in reducing hog numbers quickly. According to Lewis, feral hogs typically travel in large family groups called “sounders,” and a corral trap can often be used to capture the entire group.

– “Box Traps for Capturing Feral Hogs,” deals with a second option that should be considered after corral traps, Cathey said. While they are not the best choice for removing large hog numbers, box traps, because they are readily movable, can be used to quickly remove small numbers from trouble spots.

– “Snaring Feral Hogs,” offers instructions on placement and handling of snares. Snares are ideal for situations where feral hogs have become wary of box or corral traps. Snares are also much cheaper than traps, according to Lewis.

- "Building a Feral Hog Snare," provides step-by-step instructions for producing snares used for catching feral hogs.

For more information contact Lewis at 979-393-8517 or cdlewis@ag.tamu.edu .

-30-



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
We grant permission for the use of this news as a free service to the news media. Articles may be used either in their entirety or in part, provided that attribution remains. You may print the stories and art or you may put it on your Web sites. High resolution photos, audio and video also are provided with many of our articles for your use at agnews.tamu.edu








Post made 12-21-2010 Thanks
By:
bryceban

Quote:
Meat Safety Assurance
I work for the state with the Meat Safety Assurance and here is an e-mail we received recently concerning Tularemia:

Hunters in Texas should take precautions if they hunt feral swine. Processing or handling the raw meat from feral swine can potentially expose a person to the organism that causes tularemia (Francisella tularensis) based on research conducted by a Texas Tech team of scientists from The Institute of Environmental and Human Health. Tularemia is a zoonotic disease, meaning it is shared by humans and animals. Dr. Steven Presley’s group sampled over 100 feral swine from three Texas counties: Coryell, Bell and Crosby. Blood samples from swine in the two Central Texas counties averaged 20% positive for tularemia while 31% of the Crosby County hogs exhibited positive test results. These results indicate a significant exposure of the feral swine to this disease organism. Of greater concern is the additional finding that when four of the Crosby County animals were tested for the active presence of the organism, three were positive. Funding limitations have precluded the testing for the organism in the Central Texas hogs so they have only been determined to have been exposed to the tularemia bacteria at this point but active infection would not be unexpected.

Several forms of tularemia may occur in humans, each being dependent on the route of exposure. Skin ulcers and/or swollen lymph nodes can result if the infected fluid from the animal enters the body through skin cuts or abrasions. An oral cavity or throat infection can develop if undercooked meat from an infected animal is eaten. Inhalation of infected droplets of fluid while processing an infected animal can result in pneumonia, while an eye infection may develop if the droplets enter the mucous membranes of the eye. Even deer flies and ticks are capable of transmitting the bacteria through their bites, usually resulting in skin ulceration or swollen lymph nodes.

Due to the different potential routes of exposure, it is important for hunters to practice good personal safety while hunting or processing feral swine or handling their fresh meat. The use of insect repellent is always recommended anytime someone is going to be entering environments containing ticks or other disease vectors. The use of eye protection and gloves (latex or nitrile) are strongly recommended for people who will butcher feral hogs and disposable masks can reduce the risk of inhaling infectious fluid droplets. In addition to tularemia, feral swine may also be infected with the bacteria that cause another zoonotic disease, brucellosis. The same protective measures for tularemia will help prevent infection by the brucellosis bacteria. Since eating undercooked meat from feral hogs can also transmit these two diseases, thorough cooking is advised.

While feral hogs from only three counties have been sampled, the magnitude of the positive portion of that population suggests that feral swine from other counties can be expected to also be potential sources of F. tularensis. It is estimated that 1.5 - 2 million feral swine occur in 215 of 254 Texas counties while 32 of the 50 United States have reported their presence. The overall national population estimate is ~4 million. Since feral swine are commonly hunted and harvested for human consumption, particularly during the fall and winter deer hunting season, hunters should be made aware of the potential to become exposed to and infected with F. tularensis while handling feral swine carcasses and tissues – particularly bodily fluids.



Quote:
Feral Hog Transportation Regulations
By: Paul Schattenberg 3-21-2011


COLLEGE STATION – Landowners who trap feral hogs on their property also need to know about the regulations regarding the transportation, potential release and other means of utilizing these creatures, said Texas AgriLife Extension Service experts.

“Landowners in the Plum Creek Watershed of Hays, Caldwell and Travis counties who decide to trap feral hogs should ask themselves what they’re going to do with them after they’re trapped,” said Jared Timmons, AgriLife Extension assistant supporting the Plum Creek Watershed Partnership.

Timmons said trapping, then cooking and eating feral hogs is one viable option.

“Feral hog meat is delicious when properly prepared,” he said. “And with this option, the trapped animals never have to leave your property.”

However, he added, some people may be averse to eating feral hog or sometimes trapping yields more than can be consumed.

“In such instances, moving live feral hogs must meet a set of rules, and this plays into management decisions,” he said.

The Texas Animal Health Commission regulates the movement of feral hogs, holding facilities and some aspects of hunting preserves, said Dr. Jim Cathey, AgriLife Extension specialist in wildlife ecology.

“However, some clarification is needed here,” Cathey said. “Hunting preserves must have a hunting lease permit issued by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. And feral hog gender is regulated differently.”

Cathey said female feral hogs, sows and gilts, may not be transported and released onto another property.

“Instead, female feral hogs may be held for up to seven days in an escape-proof pen or trailer,” he explained. “They can then be taken directly to slaughter or sold to an approved holding facility which would take them to slaughter.”

A list of approved feral hog holding facilities may be found at the commission’s website at http://www.tahc.state.tx.us/animal_health/feral_swine.html.

Male feral hogs, boars and barrows, also may be held for up to seven days in an escape-proof pen or trailer and may be taken directly to slaughter or sold to an authorized holding facility, he said.

That facility then may either take them to slaughter or sell them to an authorized hunting preserve.

“Authorized hunting preserves must have swine-proof fencing and must individually identify every feral hog released on the property,” he noted. “They are also subject to periodic inspections by the Texas Animal Health Commission.”

Domestication of feral hogs is allowed, but discouraged as a further option, Cathey said.

“This process would require quarantine of a minimum of 150 days, and each animal must be tested four times as being free of pseudorabies and swine brucellosis.”

Timmons said that in addition to damaging the property of Plum Creek Watershed residents, feral hogs also have been identified as possible contributors to non-point pollution of the watershed and may be partially responsible for the water source’s elevated levels of bacteria and nitrogen.

“Feral hogs are among the topics addressed in the Plum Creek Watershed Protection Plan, which addresses multiple aspects of water quality and source preservation,” he said.

Several publications on feral hogs developed by AgriLife Extension can be downloaded free from the Plum Creek Partnership website at http://plumcreek.tamu.edu/feralhogs.

These publications address evidence of feral hogs, hunting and trapping methods and other salient topics. The site also contains online tools for use by landowners and the general public in reporting feral hog sightings or control measures.

Funding and support for the development of the Plum Creek Watershed Protection Plan is provided through a Clean Water Act §319(h) non-point source grant from the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

For more information or technical assistance with feral hogs in Plum Creek Watershed area, contact Jared Timmons at 254-485-4886 or jbtimmons@ag.tamu.edu.




Quote:
March 24, 2011 -
Busting feral hog myths
By Robert Burns AUTHORPHONE

OVERTON -- Until recently, if anyone tried to tell you how many feral hogs there
are in Texas, they were just blowing smoke, according to a Texas AgriLife
Extension Service wildlife biologist.

"When it comes to feral hogs in Texas, separating fact from fiction is becoming
a little easier as research reveals more about the pesky porcines," said Dr.
Billy Higginbotham, AgriLife Extension wildlife specialist. "There remains much
we don’t know about this exotic that has inhabited our state for the past 450
years."

Highest ranking among the myths are estimates of the actual number of feral hogs
in Texas, Higginbotham said. A common number that has been bantered about for
years is 1 to 4 million. But there was just no data to support this estimate.

That is, there wasn't until Dr. Roel Lopez, associate director of the Texas A&M
University Institute for Renewable Natural Resources, recently used geographic
information system procedures to turn the guesstimates into reliable estimates,
said Higginbotham, who collaborated with Lopez on the study.

The term "geographic information systems," usually simply called GIS, refers to
a procedure that involves diverse data gathering means, from on-the-ground GPS
referenced data to satellite to historical records, and organizes it
geographically.

"A simpler way to put it is that it’s just a electronic map," Lopez said.

Using GIS techniques, Lopez was able to quantify first the extent of the feral
hog habitat in Texas. He estimates that "approximately 134 million acres, or 79
percent of the state’s 170 million acres, represents feral hog habitat," said
Higginbotham.

By knowing the range of feral hog habitat and the species population density in
various types of Texas environments, Lopez also came up with a population
estimate that has some meat to it, Higginbotham said. Lopez estimates that the
actual number could range from a low of 1.9 million to a high of 3.4 million.

Exaggerated claims of feral hog population-growth rates are a related myth. Many
of the population guesstimates are based on a purely arbitrary number of hogs in
Texas being set at 1 million in the 1970s. This number, which also had no
research basis, is then often extrapolated on using another bit of
misinformation: That because of feral hogs' high birth rates, their population
is doubling every year.

So what are the facts?

A 2011 consolidation of past studies done by his graduate student, Janell
Mellish, the average litter size in Texas and the Southeast is 5.6 pigs, Lopez
said.

It is also known, that on average, a sow is about 13 months old when she has her
first litter, and that also on average, mature sows have 1.5 litters per year.
This means there is a significant population growth rate, but a far cry from
the doubling-yearly myth, Lopez said.

"We estimated the population growth of feral hogs in Texas averages between 18
percent to 20 percent annually," Lopez said. "This means that it would take
almost five years for a population to double in size if left unchecked."

The study, which was conducted by Lopez and Mellish, used three methods to
estimate feral pig population growth in Texas: the statewide number of aerial
permits issued for shooting feral hogs; the number of pigs processed in
commercial processing facilities; and feral hog control data made available from
U.S. Department of Agriculture-Wildlife Services.

Another common myth is that recreational hunting alone can control feral hog
populations, Higginbotham said.

"Of the dozen studies conducted across the nation, hunting removes between 8
percent and 50 percent of a population, with an average of 24 percent across all
studies," he said. "In order to hold a population stable with no growth, 60 to
70 percent of a feral hog population would have to be removed annually."

Another myth is that it's possible to identify the breed of a given feral hog by
its color markings.

"Today’s feral hogs are descended from domestic breeds, Eurasian wild boars
and, of course, hybrids of the two," Higginbotham said. "But despite claims to
the contrary, simply observing the color patterns, hair characteristics and size
cannot let you definitively identify which of the three types and individual hog
falls into."

One thing about feral hogs is definitely not a myth -- the huge amount of damage
they do to crops, wildlife habitat and landscapes, Higginbotham said. And from
all indications, the damage they do is expanding in scope and range.

"Feral hogs were once largely a rural or agricultural issue in Texas, inflicting
over $52 million in damage annually," he said. "But the porkers have literally
moved to town and are now causing significant damage in urban and suburban
communities. This damage includes the rooting of landscapes, parks, lawns, golf
courses, sports fields and even cemeteries, as they search for food. It has
been estimated that a single hog can cause over $200 damage annually."

The $200-per-hog estimate doesn't include the damage feral hogs do as they
compete with other wildlife species, such as whitetail deer, for food and
habitat, he noted. And some of the species challenged by feral hog invasions are
endangered species.

It's important to keep in perspective that the bottom line is not an actual
hog-head count, but the damage they do and how to develop ways to reduce it.

"For those landowners actively engaged in deer management, their tolerance of
feral hogs should be very, very low," Higginbotham said. "Can we (significantly)
reduce the damage feral hogs do through control efforts? The answer is
'absolutely yes.'

"Texas AgriLife Extension Service has demonstrated that through education and
outreach and Wildlife Services-led control efforts, damage can be significantly
reduced by control efforts," he said. "In a 2006-07 study funded by the Texas
Department of Agriculture, agricultural damage was reduced by 66 percent via
control efforts in just two years."

Since 2007, subsequent studies done by AgriLife Extension and again funded by
the state’s department of agriculture confirmed that control measures such as
trapping and shooting "prevented millions of dollars in damage by reducing feral
hog populations," he said.

"Landowners remain the first line of defense since Texas is 95 percent privately
owned land," Higginbotham said. "This means arming the public with Best
Management Practices and using various legal control methods to abate the damage
by reducing feral hog populations."

For more information on feral hogs, visit the AgriLife Extension website,
"Coping with Feral Hogs," at http://feralhogs.tamu.edu .






Hot links on below items are broken. Send me a PM, Join Wild Wondering, or go to TAMU for hot links.

http://www.extension.org/feral_hogs

Quote:
Wild Wonderings

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Feral Hog Resources: Just One Click Away

Posted: 13 Jun 2013 12:19 PM PDT

By
Mark Tyson, Extension Associate
Blake Alldredge, Extension Associate


Online information can be difficult to find and time consuming to access. In this modern, fast-paced world people have become accustomed to using online search engines to quickly find the information they are looking for. While most online search engines are quite accurate at producing the desired content, users may still have to filter through search results to locate the exact information they require.
The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service has developed a myriad of online feral hog related resources including publications, fact sheets, videos and websites. In an effort to increase the accessibility of these resources, hyperlinks offering individual access to all of these online resources are provided below.
Wildlife and Fisheries Extension Feral Hog Online Resources




o Feral Hog Community of Practice (CoP) website
o Feral Hog CoP
o 103 FAQs
o 54 Articles
o Ask an Expert
o 4 National Webinars (Biology, Disease, Control, Current Research)
o Coping with Feral Hogs
o Coping with Feral Hogs
o Feral Hog Reporting
o Feral Hog Reporting
o Feral Hog Publications
o Recognizing Feral Hog Sign: English Spanish
o Placing And Baiting Feral Hog Traps: English Spanish
o Corral Traps For Capturing Feral Hogs: English Spanish
o Box Traps For Feral Hogs: English Spanish
o Making A Feral Hog Snare: English Spanish
o Snaring Feral Hogs: English Spanish
o Door Modifications for Feral Hog Traps: English Spanish
o Using Fences To Exclude Feral Hogs From Wildlife Feeding Stations
o Feral Hog Population Growth, Density And Harvest In Texas
o Feral Hogs Negatively Affect Native Plant Communities
o Feral Hog Approved Holding Facility Guidelines In Texas
o Feral Hog Fact Sheets
o Feral Hogs Impact Ground Nesting Birds
o Feral Hogs Laws and Regulations In Texas
o Feral Hog Transportation Regulations
o Feral Hogs And Disease Concerns
o Feral Hogs And Water Quality in Plum Creek


o Feral Hog YouTube Videos
o
History, Biology, and Population Dynamics of Feral Hogs
o Feral Hog Impacts on Agriculture and Wildlife in Texas
o Exclusion Fencing for Wildlife Feeders
o Control Techniques and Regulations for Feral Hogs in Texas
o Strategic Shooting Of Feral Hogs For Population Control
o Trapping Feral Hogs: Using Remote Cameras
o Trapping Feral Hogs: Laws and Regulations
o Trapping Feral Hogs: Non-Target Species and Trigger Type
o Trapping Feral Hogs: Time of Year
o Trapping Feral Hogs: Corral Trap Designs
o Trapping Feral Hogs: Gates And Baits
o
Wild Wonderings Blog
o Wild Wonderings






o
Wildlife and Fisheries Extension Social Media
· Facebook
o Wildlife and Fisheries Extension
o Feral Hogs Community of Practice


In addition to these online resources, Mark Tyson and Jared Timmons have been hired as Extension Associates to help address the statewide feral hog problem. Both Tyson and Timmons will provide free technical assistance to landowners by conducting site visits to assist them in creating a feral hog management strategy specific to their property. They will also provide free watershed-based educational trainings to the public in order to increase their knowledge on feral hog biology, behavior and management options.
For more information on the feral hog resources available to the public please contact Mark Tyson at (979) 845-4698 or Jared Timmons at (254) 485-4886.


You are subscribed to email updates from Wild Wonderings
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now. Email delivery powered by Google
Google Inc., 20 West Kinzie, Chicago IL USA 60610




5-30-2018
Quote:


Last edited by jeh7mmmag; 05/31/18 02:20 AM.

“Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in,
where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul.”
~ John Muir
Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: jeh7mmmag] #265667
11/30/07 06:33 PM
11/30/07 06:33 PM
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,124
Temple, TX
D
deuce12 Offline
Pro Tracker
deuce12  Offline
Pro Tracker
D

Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,124
Temple, TX
thanks


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: deuce12] #265668
12/02/07 03:13 PM
12/02/07 03:13 PM
Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 10,534
Flower Mound, TX
a777pilot Offline
THF Celebrity
a777pilot  Offline
THF Celebrity

Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 10,534
Flower Mound, TX
Are there any parts of the State of Texas that have solved their "hog problem"?

I keep thinking that with all the hunters in this State and the fact that one can just about hunt them any time, any where (with permission) with just about any weapon, why there are still so many of these hog out there?

Are they really that prolific and that smart?



"To be prepared for war is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace."

George Washington, in his and our nation's first State of the Unions message, 8 JAN 1790.

Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: a777pilot] #265669
12/02/07 04:34 PM
12/02/07 04:34 PM
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 28,173
Howard County
HWY_MAN Online content
THF Celebrity
HWY_MAN  Online Content
THF Celebrity

Joined: May 2006
Posts: 28,173
Howard County
Quote:

Are they really that prolific and that smart?




Smart no! Prolific yes. Add that to the tendency for them to move at night and a limited amount of predators willing to take on the onslaught of an adult hog.



Yes! A Weatherby does kill them deader.
Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: HWY_MAN] #265670
12/02/07 04:44 PM
12/02/07 04:44 PM
Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 16,474
Azle, Texas
Crazyhorse Offline
THF Celebrity
Crazyhorse  Offline
THF Celebrity

Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 16,474
Azle, Texas
Quote:

Smart no!




I am gonna have to disagree with you on that one.

On the scale of animal intelligence, pigs are smarter than cats or dogs.

Why do you think they go nocturnal if they are shot into a couple of times during the day time.

The fact that in some places people keep catching hog after hog in their traps, is due to greed on the hogs part in wanting to get at the bait inside the trap.

I bet there are folks out there right now that are beginning to experience hogs that are getting trap smart. JMO.


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: Crazyhorse] #265671
12/02/07 04:57 PM
12/02/07 04:57 PM
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 28,173
Howard County
HWY_MAN Online content
THF Celebrity
HWY_MAN  Online Content
THF Celebrity

Joined: May 2006
Posts: 28,173
Howard County
I think it depends on how we measure their intelligence. If we measure it on their ability to avoid hunters, I would have to say not very smart. One of the reasons they’re so popular to hunt with a bow or handguns is the hunter’s ability to get in close. Their eye sights poor, to say the least, making them easy to stalk by just playing the wind.


Quote:

Why do you think they go nocturnal




I don't think they go nocturnal, their just nocturnal by nature as are most wild creatures.



Yes! A Weatherby does kill them deader.
Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: HWY_MAN] #265672
12/02/07 05:12 PM
12/02/07 05:12 PM
Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 10,534
Flower Mound, TX
a777pilot Offline
THF Celebrity
a777pilot  Offline
THF Celebrity

Joined: Jan 2007
Posts: 10,534
Flower Mound, TX
This is great. Just like the age old question: Which is smarter, the pig or the horse? I always picked the pig. Ya don't see them with cowboys on their backs all day, do you?



"To be prepared for war is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace."

George Washington, in his and our nation's first State of the Unions message, 8 JAN 1790.

Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: HWY_MAN] #265673
12/02/07 05:21 PM
12/02/07 05:21 PM
Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 16,474
Azle, Texas
Crazyhorse Offline
THF Celebrity
Crazyhorse  Offline
THF Celebrity

Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 16,474
Azle, Texas
The places where they are hunted with bow and handgun are different than places where they have been hunted with rifles.

Bow and handgun hunting work in areas with big hog populations and low hunting pressure.

Try putting a bow or handgun hunter out on a place where the hogs have received lots of pressure and the population is on the low side.

Also just like white tail deer will go nocturnal, so will pigs.

True, pigs do prefer to travel during the periods of low light.

I have also seen pigs change from moving around just before dark, to not moving at all until well after dark because they had been shot at. JMO.


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: Crazyhorse] #265674
12/03/07 11:40 PM
12/03/07 11:40 PM
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 11,332
Saginaw, Tx
P
passthru Offline
THF Celebrity
passthru  Offline
THF Celebrity
P

Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 11,332
Saginaw, Tx
Hogs will go nocturnal quicker too. Still, that's why we have glow sticks and spot lights.



I work hard, drink a little and hunt when I can.
NRA Life Member
southwestdocks@gmail.com
http://www.threefingersbowhunting.com/
Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: passthru] #265675
12/13/07 09:27 PM
12/13/07 09:27 PM
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 4,736
P
PappawRock Offline
Extreme Tracker
PappawRock  Offline
Extreme Tracker
P

Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 4,736
Well hopefully a pig or two'll log in and blog a bit just to demonstrate their intelligence, or lack thereof, and settle this issue...otherwise Id hafta vote for the hog and rider theory that A777 come up with...of course on the other hand, maybe the hogs are what cowboys ride at night and THAT's why we don't see them rode...


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: PappawRock] #265676
12/15/07 11:53 PM
12/15/07 11:53 PM
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,042
The Island Cres
T
TEXASLEFTY Online content
THF Celebrity
TEXASLEFTY  Online Content
THF Celebrity
T

Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,042
The Island Cres
hogs use there noses more than anything else! I know a man who is in his late 70s he grew up somewhere close to jasper as a child they had no running water and the well was some distance from there house one day his grandmother and siblings were getting water and came up on some wild pigs she told them dont make a sound and dont move he said after a little while the pigs just walked off he thinks it was becuase they could not see them or here them



Originally Posted By: Chunky Monkey
Never been to a camping world. I prefer Dick's to be honest.
Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: TEXASLEFTY] #265677
01/13/08 05:59 PM
01/13/08 05:59 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 476
Aledo, TX
H
hsuhunter Offline
Bird Dog
hsuhunter  Offline
Bird Dog
H

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 476
Aledo, TX
i have walked up to 10 yards and shot them with my bow, very bad vision. good noses though. you have to kill 80 percent or the hog population every year for it not to grow. it is just impossible to kill that many, other than with helicopters and class 3 weapons



I don't live in Dallas...... Amen
Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: hsuhunter] #265678
01/17/08 02:25 AM
01/17/08 02:25 AM
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 799
Freestone county, Texas
T
texasspazzman Offline
Tracker
texasspazzman  Offline
Tracker
T

Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 799
Freestone county, Texas
#1 - YES! They will charge some times. Down here in BFE we hunt them a lot with dogs and when they are bayed up by a bunch of dogs they get...shall we say "irritated". The other dangerous moment is if you're dealing with a momma and piglets. I have personally been chased up a tree more than once! Most of the time though, they'll just turn and run away. Especially when shot.

#2 - Their sight is poor, their hearing is decent, and their noses are (I think) as good or better than a deer. My main bow hunting place here in East Texas is covered with them and has been for 10-15 years, so I'm talking from experience.

#3 - It is ILLEGAL to carry a firearm (rifle or handgun) during the Archery Only deer season. The game warden won't care to hear your excuse of "I'm hunting hogs". The rest of the year, it's legal.

and #4...

My solution to the bow hunting question is USE A LADDER STAND and bait out a spot. You'll have heck trying to find and stalk hogs on the ground.


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: texasspazzman] #265679
01/17/08 12:56 PM
01/17/08 12:56 PM
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,042
The Island Cres
T
TEXASLEFTY Online content
THF Celebrity
TEXASLEFTY  Online Content
THF Celebrity
T

Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,042
The Island Cres
it is not illegal to carry a handgun during bow only if you have a CHL



Originally Posted By: Chunky Monkey
Never been to a camping world. I prefer Dick's to be honest.
Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: TEXASLEFTY] #265680
01/17/08 01:10 PM
01/17/08 01:10 PM
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,037
Frisco TX
O
okbowhunter Offline
Veteran Tracker
okbowhunter  Offline
Veteran Tracker
O

Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,037
Frisco TX
Quote:

it is not illegal to carry a handgun during bow only if you have a CHL




Question, so it's not illegal if you have a CHL but can you legally kill a hog with the weapon ... while engaging in archery for deer?


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: TEXASLEFTY] #265681
01/17/08 05:30 PM
01/17/08 05:30 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 799
Freestone county, Texas
T
texasspazzman Offline
Tracker
texasspazzman  Offline
Tracker
T

Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 799
Freestone county, Texas
TEXASLEFTY is right, and I stand corrected.

I was not aware of the Concealed Handgun exception, but here it is: (from TPWD)

Archery and Crossbows
It is unlawful to be in possession of a firearm while hunting with a broadhead HUNTING point during the Archery-Only season, EXCEPT a person licensed to carry a concealed handgun in Texas may carry a concealed handgun.


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: texasspazzman] #265682
01/19/08 01:25 PM
01/19/08 01:25 PM
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 25
Denton County
G
Greybeard Offline
Light Foot
Greybeard  Offline
Light Foot
G

Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 25
Denton County
"Question, so it's not illegal if you have a CHL but can you legally kill a hog with the weapon ... while engaging in archery for deer?"

Use of handgun must be in strict accordance with CHL laws, predominantly covered in Chapter 9 of Penal Code. And there ain't mention in there of shooting pigs. In my not-so-humble opinion, closest thing applicable could possibly be be "Necessity", aka "Law of Competing Harms". CHL Instructor #6616


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: Greybeard] #265683
03/10/08 03:06 AM
03/10/08 03:06 AM
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 3,005
central texas
C
cibolo Offline
Veteran Tracker
cibolo  Offline
Veteran Tracker
C

Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 3,005
central texas
so if the hog is charging and you are in imminent danger go ahead and dispatch the hog. would you use a two tap or keep firing until you no longer feel threatend. i've seen some people in situations with hogs and russian boar and mixes with bows were i was glad i had my 30/30 or .44 for close encounters especially with mama and her little one's. as for how smart they are they are like cock roaches and can adapt to any enviorment and will eat anything. it seems like you shoot one and 30 more pop up. my buddy has about a 3 acre inclosure on his 500 acre place that he keeps nothing but ferral hogs and we usually shoot about 5 a month for a bbq and such or give them to the ranchhands,but it seems like you just throw water on them and they reproduce like damn gremlins.



"Error of Opinion may be tolerated where Reason is left free to combat it." - Thomas Jefferson
"If we ever forget that we're one nation under GOD, then we will be a nation gone under." - Ronald Reagan
Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: hsuhunter] #265684
03/31/08 04:09 PM
03/31/08 04:09 PM
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 9,881
Coleman, Tx.
C
Cool_Hand Offline
THF Trophy Hunter
Cool_Hand  Offline
THF Trophy Hunter
C

Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 9,881
Coleman, Tx.
This why we have our place flown every year. Even at the rate of kill from the air they still repopulate because of the short gestation period. And are they smart??? In a lot of ways especially if they've been shot at from the air and the next time they are approached they just stand perfectally still!!! You have to make very low level passes and try to guess where they are hold up! I think its called hide n' seek!!




Benny
Promise Ranch
Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: Cool_Hand] #265685
03/31/08 06:06 PM
03/31/08 06:06 PM
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 9,051
Coleman County
M
MaggieMTx Offline
THF Trophy Hunter
MaggieMTx  Offline
THF Trophy Hunter
M

Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 9,051
Coleman County
Had someone fly by our place saturday afternoon/evening, he was in his white helicopter, knew he was the local fly-by-shooter lol


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: TEXASLEFTY] #265686
03/31/08 06:46 PM
03/31/08 06:46 PM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 22
bastrop county
D
dayton Offline
Light Foot
dayton  Offline
Light Foot
D

Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 22
bastrop county
yes it is


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: dayton] #265687
04/14/08 05:10 PM
04/14/08 05:10 PM
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 8
B
BRUTE Offline
Green Horn
BRUTE  Offline
Green Horn
B

Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 8
Hogs are very smart, they just get in trouble because of water, food, and sex.

They are a very tough and durable animal. They can be seem to be some of the easiest animals to hunt if they have not been hunted before, no pressure, but put a little pressure on them and you will have to work for it. It can be very rewarding, especially to take large trophy type boars.


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: a777pilot] #265688
05/04/08 12:08 PM
05/04/08 12:08 PM
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 676
Texas
T
TGalyon1 Offline
Tracker
TGalyon1  Offline
Tracker
T

Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 676
Texas
Quote:

Are there any parts of the State of Texas that have solved their "hog problem"?

I keep thinking that with all the hunters in this State and the fact that one can just about hunt them any time, any where (with permission) with just about any weapon, why there are still so many of these hog out there?

Are they really that prolific and that smart?




There are two kinds of property in Texas those that have hogs and those that are going to get hogs .


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: HWY_MAN] #265689
05/09/08 03:14 PM
05/09/08 03:14 PM
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 11,659
Formerly from Nantucket...
C
cody Offline
THF Celebrity
cody  Offline
THF Celebrity
C

Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 11,659
Formerly from Nantucket...
I don't think their eyesight is all that poor...I've ambled up on a wheat field 400 yards away and downwind and had them run like their a$$es were on fire.


Re: FERAL HOG INFORMATION THREAD [Re: cody] #265690
05/15/08 09:37 PM
05/15/08 09:37 PM
Joined: May 2008
Posts: 9
DEEP IN THE DURTY SOUTHERN STA...
S
STRIKE_N_STOP_EM_KENNELS Offline
Green Horn
STRIKE_N_STOP_EM_KENNELS  Offline
Green Horn
S

Joined: May 2008
Posts: 9
DEEP IN THE DURTY SOUTHERN STA...
There just aint no stoppin em.

We've killed at least a good 55-60 pig's in the last six month's an we still cant get rid of em'.



RUN EM' DOWN
Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Previous Thread
Index
Next Thread

© 2004-2019 OUTDOOR SITES NETWORK all rights reserved USA and Worldwide
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.1