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Can a nose be too good? #8988491 01/16/24 12:22 AM
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Smokey Bear Online Content OP
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Had the two year old out hunting woodcock yesterday enjoying the cool weather. A little background before I get back to the question. Still a work in progress but I’ve killed a lot of wild birds over him. He has been brought along hunting a lot of runners on the desert and spooky prairie birds. The goal has been a wild bird dog that points first scent, relocates on its own and can work running birds, and will stand his birds when they hold. So back to yesterday. We were in the woods in rank cover. We had been running a six month old pup. Bird densities were low and woodcock are almost always solitary. Those conditions show a good deal about what kind of hunt a dog has. I enjoy seeing it. Next drop we put Moon down. The birds were scattered. In advance of the cold snap we are in today they were buried up in the heaviest cover. Visibility was 30 yards maximum in the cover that held birds. In many places half that. My Garmin alerted me to Moons point 150 yards away. It took me about 5 minutes to loop around through the cover to come in from the front with the heavy cover between the dog and me. As I approached the heavy cover, with the dog still holding, the bird flushed from between us, 71 yards from the dog. I was caught flat footed and thought I must have bumped a different bird. About that time I looked at my GPS. The dog had came off point and went directly to the place the bird flushed from. Indeed he had it pointed at 70 yards. In that cover it was too far. In time and with more birds and experience, he will have to figure it out if he is going to be an upper echelon wild bird dog. Still a work in progress but none the less, I was impressed by the little boogers nose. His lack of polish handling birds and reading the cover in combination with a supreme nose cost me in that scenario. What do y’all say? Is there such a thing as a pointing dog with too good of a nose?


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Re: Can a nose be too good? [Re: Smokey Bear] #8988540 01/16/24 01:21 AM
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Better than flushing the bird.



Re: Can a nose be too good? [Re: Smokey Bear] #8988634 01/16/24 03:52 AM
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Sounds like moon has an exceptional nose.Well sir, enjoy every step with your dog seems they go away to soon.thanks for sharing your hunt.

Re: Can a nose be too good? [Re: Smokey Bear] #8990356 01/19/24 02:20 PM
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I've had them point birds that far away.
The better the nose, the better.


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Re: Can a nose be too good? [Re: reeltexan] #8990800 01/20/24 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by reeltexan


I've had them point birds that far away.
The better the nose, the better.


I thought it would spark a good discussion. Not so much here. There seems to be fewer and fewer pointing dog men still actively training & hunting their own dogs. My thoughts are: that intense low and tight point that we all like to see happens at relatively close range and in heavy cover. In low open cover birds don’t tolerate being crowded. The dog with the nose and savvy to point singles way out in low diffuse cover impresses me. The dog with the nose and lack of savvy that points at that range in heavy cover doesn’t get many retrieves and the handler doesn’t get many shot opportunities. The great ones that possess the nose learn to adjust the way they work their birds to the cover and species they are working.


Smokey Bear---Lone Star State.
Re: Can a nose be too good? [Re: Smokey Bear] #8991182 01/21/24 01:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Smokey Bear
Had the two year old out hunting woodcock yesterday enjoying the cool weather. A little background before I get back to the question. Still a work in progress but I’ve killed a lot of wild birds over him. He has been brought along hunting a lot of runners on the desert and spooky prairie birds. The goal has been a wild bird dog that points first scent, relocates on its own and can work running birds, and will stand his birds when they hold. So back to yesterday. We were in the woods in rank cover. We had been running a six month old pup. Bird densities were low and woodcock are almost always solitary. Those conditions show a good deal about what kind of hunt a dog has. I enjoy seeing it. Next drop we put Moon down. The birds were scattered. In advance of the cold snap we are in today they were buried up in the heaviest cover. Visibility was 30 yards maximum in the cover that held birds. In many places half that. My Garmin alerted me to Moons point 150 yards away. It took me about 5 minutes to loop around through the cover to come in from the front with the heavy cover between the dog and me. As I approached the heavy cover, with the dog still holding, the bird flushed from between us, 71 yards from the dog. I was caught flat footed and thought I must have bumped a different bird. About that time I looked at my GPS. The dog had came off point and went directly to the place the bird flushed from. Indeed he had it pointed at 70 yards. In that cover it was too far. In time and with more birds and experience, he will have to figure it out if he is going to be an upper echelon wild bird dog. Still a work in progress but none the less, I was impressed by the little boogers nose. His lack of polish handling birds and reading the cover in combination with a supreme nose cost me in that scenario. What do y’all say? Is there such a thing as a pointing dog with too good of a nose?


I would say NO. There is no such thing as too good of a nose. Just teach them how to use it!

Re: Can a nose be too good? [Re: scalebuster] #8991989 01/22/24 04:49 PM
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Chet Offline
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This------if anyone finds one with too good a nose please give me a call and I'll take the no good off your hands.

Re: Can a nose be too good? [Re: Smokey Bear] #8993494 01/24/24 04:36 PM
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You might have caught a perfect storm of high humidity, light but enough wind, etc. In Arizona over the weekend, we had a dry 20% humidity day and dogs where uncharacteristically false pointing that usually don't and getting to close to pressured desert birds. The next day after it raining over night, those same dogs were pointing running gambels at 50 to 60 yards.

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