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Night light Color #8224440 04/03/21 06:58 PM
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FullDraw55 Offline OP
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From about 100 yards, What color is best for hunting hogs at night, red, green? I have read we’re green scares the game. Also, would you use a scope mount light or a feeder mount, something like wildgame innovations? any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

Last edited by FullDraw55; 04/03/21 07:01 PM.

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Re: Night light Color [Re: FullDraw55] #8224463 04/03/21 07:35 PM
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In my experience, lighting up animals from a spot light has the worst results with white, then green, then red. The more sudden and intense the light, the more the animals get spooked. Lights that run all the time on a feeder (meaning something that becomes a norm for the animals) will bother the animals initially, and then they get used to it. You can use white, green, or red. If you use motion sensor lights, it helps if they come on slowly, but the animals will get used to it even if it comes on quickly.

Obviously, they see white light. Some claim that they can't see green and that would be completely wrong. That is the end of the spectrum they see well. Some say they can't see red and that is mostly true. They may not be able to discern the color red as being red, but I have certainly managed to spook hogs with a red light and with a red laser. So, they definitely see something, even if they don't know it is red. Supposedly, my cat and dogs can't see red, either, but love to chase the red laser dot around the yard.

The downside to feeder lights is that you can only see around the feeder. The upside is that animals get used to the lights.

The downside to weapon mounted lights is that the animals are more likely to spook if they realize they are being lit up, but you can see into areas other than your feeder.

Spotting critters with white light is easiest for humans and has the greatest range for the amount of power used.
Next is green light in visibility and distance.
Red is probably the hardest light to use and is the color of light that best preserves your night vision. It has the shortest distance projected that is usable for human eyesight.


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Re: Night light Color [Re: Double Naught Spy] #8224588 04/03/21 10:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Double Naught Spy
In my experience, lighting up animals from a spot light has the worst results with white, then green, then red. The more sudden and intense the light, the more the animals get spooked. Lights that run all the time on a feeder (meaning something that becomes a norm for the animals) will bother the animals initially, and then they get used to it. You can use white, green, or red. If you use motion sensor lights, it helps if they come on slowly, but the animals will get used to it even if it comes on quickly.

Obviously, they see white light. Some claim that they can't see green and that would be completely wrong. That is the end of the spectrum they see well. Some say they can't see red and that is mostly true. They may not be able to discern the color red as being red, but I have certainly managed to spook hogs with a red light and with a red laser. So, they definitely see something, even if they don't know it is red. Supposedly, my cat and dogs can't see red, either, but love to chase the red laser dot around the yard.

The downside to feeder lights is that you can only see around the feeder. The upside is that animals get used to the lights.

The downside to weapon mounted lights is that the animals are more likely to spook if they realize they are being lit up, but you can see into areas other than your feeder.

Spotting critters with white light is easiest for humans and has the greatest range for the amount of power used.
Next is green light in visibility and distance.
Red is probably the hardest light to use and is the color of light that best preserves your night vision. It has the shortest distance projected that is usable for human eyesight.



I agree with the above entirely and it reflects 'pun intended' my experiences as well. It is a misnomer that hogs can not see green light (for what it is). They also see 'red' light....just not as the color we see it as. Probably a shade of gray for them. BUT it is NOT invisible to them as some folks claim.

After a few decades now of using lights at bait sites I've noticed that light 'intensity' and the 'angle' at which it is shone has a lot to do with how accepting hogs are of it. I don't mount my lights on a feeder itself....since it is the focus of their attention to begin with AND the light 'source' (which they will always see) is too low.

I mount my lights as high as I can practically get them (12'-14') and no more than 15 yds. away to keep the angle of incidence shallow. Hogs are keen to notice anything NEW in area they are familiar with. But I've found that by mounting the light source high...it is much less a concern to them than something down low. Presumably because they have no natural threats from 'above' (in most instances). Also their normal line of sight is not keyed to that area.

Yes, hogs will eventually get 'used to' just about any light source, but why set yourself up for a situation where they have to be 'conditioned'. I am fortunate in that I have a wooded area with plenty of tall trees where I hunt, but I have lashed a light to a long piece of pipe and wired that off to a fence post in areas of my pastures that I sometimes bait them into.

My preference is NOT use motion detectors. A light or light source suddenly appearing is almost sure to get their attention. The 'light' itself (not the source) is not often the problem. What seems to scare/alert them is either spotting the light 'source' or suddenly seeing the 'shadows' it creates. A light mounted high will create smaller and fewer shadows.

I prefer to put my lights (permanent lights) on photocells. That way when hogs approach the area is already lit. They may see the source from a distance but then can 'choose' to ignore it , come in and investigate or leave, but they won't be suddenly spooked by it. I've had hogs literally 'hang up' at the edge of the light on the ground and come no farther. So.....I don't buy into the idea that they CAN'T see certain colors (as in invisible). This is not to be confused with a hog simply ignoring it.

With my set ups and NEW hogs (never having been to the bait site before) it's about 50/50. Some come right in as if nothing is out of place, others will not approach (that night).

As for color: Many folks choose green because it seems to project farther and humans see it well. But I can tell you....hogs do too. Red (to me) needs to be a stronger light but preserves 'detail' well and does not reflect back (or washout) like green does if there is any fog/haze in the air.

Now I know many here will argue some of these points citing many times they've had hogs completely ignore either color. I don't doubt that. I have to. Many things contribute to how cautious (or not) hogs will be when approaching a feeder or bait site. But its always best to swing things in your favor as much as possible.

To that end....my observations above.

Last edited by flintknapper; 04/03/21 11:03 PM.

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Re: Night light Color [Re: FullDraw55] #8224895 04/04/21 10:51 AM
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I have a stand & fill feeder with green and white motion lighting attached (just happened that way) that doesn't keep hogs, deer, possums, coons, fox, coyote from feasting on the corn it throws. A light that stays on all night on a post away from the feeder probably helps ease them in. Sometimes I have someone with me that doesn't have thermal/nv and the lighting allows them a shot also w/o a flashlight. It also allows me to see what is there with a glance through the binocs. YMMV

Have used mounted flashlight and prefer the feeder/area lighting. Couldn't tell any difference in color used.

Last edited by Pootie; 04/04/21 10:54 AM.

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Re: Night light Color [Re: flintknapper] #8225058 04/04/21 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by flintknapper

Now I know many here will argue some of these points citing many times they've had hogs completely ignore either color.


Back in the day, Laser Genetics with their super powerful green light (was it actually a laser?) claimed that animals were unbothered by their light and then showed video of several animals including a big elk (IIRC) just ignoring the light. This impressed my hunting buddy at the time who bought one of their lights. First time he lit up some hogs with it, they were gone before get got his safety off. So convince by the video that he figured he did something wrong or that they scented. Next hunt, same result. He was very disappointed that he had purchased a $300 light (very expensive at the time) that was giving him the same results as using a white light.

I think, particularly with hogs, that if you catch hogs that have never been lit up before, they won't spook or aren't as likely to spook. If they have been lit up and shot at before, then they simply know to run when lit up.

We even had the problem with 850 nm infrared lights we used with night vision. The lights broadcast no light that could be seen by the human or hog eye beyond a few inches. However, the lights had a dull red glow that was visible. On several occasions, we had hogs react to the dull glow of the light. Undoubtedly, we had hunted them before. They had come to associate the light with danger.


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Re: Night light Color [Re: Double Naught Spy] #8225104 04/04/21 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Double Naught Spy
We even had the problem with 850 nm infrared lights we used with night vision. The lights broadcast no light that could be seen by the human or hog eye beyond a few inches. However, the lights had a dull red glow that was visible. On several occasions, we had hogs react to the dull glow of the light. Undoubtedly, we had hunted them before. They had come to associate the light with danger.


When I used an early model of the Photon IR sight, I sometimes noticed a similar reaction. I'd turn on the IR illuminator, and occasionally a hog would stop and look directly at me. They might resume rooting or eating, but every few seconds they'd look in my direction. I figured they saw the glow of the illuminator but didn't know/fear what it was. I always tried to shoot those hogs before they became educated to the danger.


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Re: Night light Color [Re: FullDraw55] #8225169 04/04/21 04:41 PM
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