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The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities #8045670 11/10/20 10:10 PM
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Texas Dan Offline OP
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I noticed a good read in this months issue of Deer and Deer Hunting magazine (Hard Work Earns the Buck) where the author focuses on the things kids can do to earn their opportunities in taking a buck. As he puts it, "Sometimes, the process of a hunt matters as much - and is just as rewarding as the outcome."

What activities have you found worked well in allowing your son or daughter to earn the opportunity to shoot a white tail or any other game animal for that matter?


Dan

Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Texas Dan] #8045738 11/10/20 11:12 PM
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For me it’s starts with being proficient with whatever they are shooting, then spending some time in the stand watching deer on the hoof. It took my son 3 seasons to connect on a buck and he was 13, after that he lost interest. my oldest daughter shot a very nice 9 point on her second year of hunting and has since shot 4 others and she would hunt this year but is in college and doesn’t have the time. My youngest daughter can shoot very well at 9 years old but is apprehensive about actually shooting a deer so I am going to let it happen on her terms, she has spent time hunting with me and is always willing to help clean a deer but I will not push her to shoot one until she is ready. They all earned the opportunity and I would let them shoot the most mature buck they see, I have never believed a kid has to start with a doe or a spike, you make them pass on a mature buck and they may not want to hunt again. I would easily let one of my kids shoot my big buck for the year!

Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Big8] #8046006 11/11/20 02:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Big8
I have never believed a kid has to start with a doe or a spike, you make them pass on a mature buck and they may not want to hunt again. I would easily let one of my kids shoot my big buck for the year!



I can go along with this line of thinking. When I was a kid, this was a common practice for kids to shoot does, spikes, culls, etc. I shot alot of deer growing up, but we leased out the ranch for package hunts and I shot mostly does and culls until I was 25 years old. I have taken 3 or 4 decent whitetail in my life but looking back I think that being limited in that way, with such strict parameters on what I could shoot, and watching and having to pass on good deer every season, pretty much killed any desire I currently have for hunting whitetails. Am super grateful for the opportunities i had, as it made me a very efficient killer, but it did take away from my desire later on. I had no issues with my kids first deer being does, which was appropriate for their age, but never limited them on what they could shoot past that as long as it met the age criteria.

I wouldn't take my kid on a paid hunt and let him shoot a 170" deer for his first few bucks, but I'm not gonna pull him off a mature shooter either.


For it is not the quarry that we truly seek, but the adventure.
Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Texas Dan] #8046082 11/11/20 03:10 AM
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I could have made my daughter pass on the deer to the right, but if I had I am not sure if she would have hunted with me anymore, she shot a good deer and was hooked after that. She has other deer in the garage so she has done well!

Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Texas Dan] #8046304 11/11/20 01:01 PM
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I'm sure it's different for every kid, but IMO you want to start with a focus on what's going to make them stay interested in the sport for the long term. And the best way to do this IMO is to expose them to each aspect of the sport individually so they can recognize each for its value and benefits . I've read posts where a parent mentioned their child having lost interest in the sport. Maybe they just weren't that interested from the start, or maybe there was something of value to which they were never exposed in the right manner. It was her being first introduced to shooting that gave my youngest daughter her the desire to want to hunt pigs. Another of my daughters seemed to first get into learning deer behavior and looking for sign so she would better her chances at seeing one. My oldest never got past the shooting stage. Every child is different no doubt.

Last edited by Texas Dan; 11/11/20 01:05 PM.

Dan

Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Texas Dan] #8046314 11/11/20 01:14 PM
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I grew up hunting in PA so a little different style hunting. We did drives mostly. Legal hunting age in PA to hunt at that time was 12 years old. I was really always into hunting because it was something my stepdad did every year and we ate alot of deer meat. Starting about 10 years old my step dad would take me with him and i would be a driver. after 2 years of doing this i definitely earned my spot on stand. Opening week of my 12 year old hunting season i shot my first buck and it was because my step dad put me on stand where he knew the buck would come out if he was there. Many thanks to him for that. It also made me appreciate that first buck/deer a whole lot more. 2 years of pushing through briar patches and hardwoods will do that. little did i know once i shot my buck i was straight back to being a driver LOL.


That's what she said
Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Texas Dan] #8046348 11/11/20 01:45 PM
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To each their own I guess. The way I read this is “do you leverage hunting as a disciplinary tool?” In this day in age, I’m just glad my kids enjoy hunting. After my kids are grown and gone, I sure would hate knowing I killed a memory because my kid didn’t earn it.. screw that! Maybe my standards or ways of parenting are different in that I lead by example. They see the hard work, time, and money that goes into it. If they want to help, great, but I don’t expect it. All I need from them is a “yes, I’d like to go.” Like leaving work at the office, we leave anything going on at the house, at the house. Hunting is a time to make memories and not an opportunity to reward my child. Rarely do I hunt without one of my kids and going without just feels wrong..

Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Texas Dan] #8046366 11/11/20 01:59 PM
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I make my grandson's earn their hunts, but in a different way. Before they can hunt they must help around the place.
Build a fire pit," those stones were heavy for a 11 year old, cut grass, etc. They I hope they kill the biggest buck in
the woods.


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Sleeps 10, If interested please PM me.
Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Stevarino] #8046367 11/11/20 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Stevarino
To each their own I guess. The way I read this is “do you leverage hunting as a disciplinary tool?” In this day in age, I’m just glad my kids enjoy hunting. After my kids are grown and gone, I sure would hate knowing I killed a memory because my kid didn’t earn it.. screw that! Maybe my standards or ways of parenting are different in that I lead by example. They see the hard work, time, and money that goes into it. If they want to help, great, but I don’t expect it. All I need from them is a “yes, I’d like to go.” Like leaving work at the office, we leave anything going on at the house, at the house. Hunting is a time to make memories and not an opportunity to reward my child. Rarely do I hunt without one of my kids and going without just feels wrong..

To me this speaks volumes about the general awful behavior of todays youth. Parents are now friends.


It's hell eatin em live
Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: redchevy] #8046376 11/11/20 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by redchevy
Originally Posted by Stevarino
To each their own I guess. The way I read this is “do you leverage hunting as a disciplinary tool?” In this day in age, I’m just glad my kids enjoy hunting. After my kids are grown and gone, I sure would hate knowing I killed a memory because my kid didn’t earn it.. screw that! Maybe my standards or ways of parenting are different in that I lead by example. They see the hard work, time, and money that goes into it. If they want to help, great, but I don’t expect it. All I need from them is a “yes, I’d like to go.” Like leaving work at the office, we leave anything going on at the house, at the house. Hunting is a time to make memories and not an opportunity to reward my child. Rarely do I hunt without one of my kids and going without just feels wrong..

To me this speaks volumes about the general awful behavior of todays youth. Parents are now friends.


Funny. As if you know what goes on in my house. Maybe it’s that we have well behaved kids due to harsh discipline at home. I remind my kids almost daily we’re not friends... thanks for the laugh though

Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Texas Dan] #8047902 11/12/20 01:50 PM
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LOL you can get bent out of shape about it if you want, but you said as much in your own words in your own post.


It's hell eatin em live
Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Texas Dan] #8047935 11/12/20 02:13 PM
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I started hunting with my dad when I was 7, and I miss him and the experiences that we had. I hope that my kids enjoy the hobby as well, and they have been to the hunting lease with me. That said, my twins are 5, and my decision as their father is to groom them. It's a lot of responsibility to put a gun into a child's hands and it starts years in advance. My son knows that his guns are toys and mine are tools -- you don't mess with daddy's tools without asking. He also knows that if he can't listen and obey simple requests at home, then I won't let him go to the hunting lease. Some would say that is harsh and overbearing, and that is ok since it's not their house, kids, lease.

Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: redchevy] #8047999 11/12/20 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by redchevy
Originally Posted by Stevarino
To each their own I guess. The way I read this is “do you leverage hunting as a disciplinary tool?” In this day in age, I’m just glad my kids enjoy hunting. After my kids are grown and gone, I sure would hate knowing I killed a memory because my kid didn’t earn it.. screw that! Maybe my standards or ways of parenting are different in that I lead by example. They see the hard work, time, and money that goes into it. If they want to help, great, but I don’t expect it. All I need from them is a “yes, I’d like to go.” Like leaving work at the office, we leave anything going on at the house, at the house. Hunting is a time to make memories and not an opportunity to reward my child. Rarely do I hunt without one of my kids and going without just feels wrong..

To me this speaks volumes about the general awful behavior of todays youth. Parents are now friends.


X2

I don't have any kids yet but I make my little brother help me with tasks throughout the year so that I will take him hunting with me. If he doesn't want to earn it there are a line of people behind him who would be happy to!


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Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: TLew] #8048042 11/12/20 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by TLew
I started hunting with my dad when I was 7, and I miss him and the experiences that we had. I hope that my kids enjoy the hobby as well, and they have been to the hunting lease with me. That said, my twins are 5, and my decision as their father is to groom them. It's a lot of responsibility to put a gun into a child's hands and it starts years in advance. My son knows that his guns are toys and mine are tools -- you don't mess with daddy's tools without asking. He also knows that if he can't listen and obey simple requests at home, then I won't let him go to the hunting lease. Some would say that is harsh and overbearing, and that is ok since it's not their house, kids, lease.

Well said and I’m not going to judge you for it...your house, your kids...

Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: redchevy] #8048074 11/12/20 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by redchevy
LOL you can get bent out of shape about it if you want, but you said as much in your own words in your own post.

When it comes to my family, yeah I do get a little bent out of shape. You’re literally saying I’m a bad parent because I don’t use hunting as a means to discipline my children. Absolutely ignorant and can tell reading comprehension is not your strong skill set. They do help, but I don’t have to ask. They do screw up at home, and we handle it at home.
I owe no explanation in how I raise my kids but can guarantee you they’re not spoiled little punks. Ignorance is a choice bro.. keep on trolling.

Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Texas Dan] #8048094 11/12/20 03:48 PM
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I said and quote "general awful behavior of todays youth"

When did i call you out and belittle your raising of your family in your home?

Now who doesnt have reading comprehension as a strong suit?


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Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Texas Dan] #8048184 11/12/20 04:41 PM
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This weekend in camp, one boy helped me clean out the cabin, trim brush and cut cedars. The other boy sat around, tossed his football and took a nap.

Guess which one gets the preferential treatment when it comes to hunting? I didnt tell the other one no, he can’t go out, but I’m not going out of my way to put him on anything. And he keeps it up at this current pace I will leave him at home

I reward based on performance and laziness is a choice


For it is not the quarry that we truly seek, but the adventure.
Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: txtrophy85] #8048343 11/12/20 07:02 PM
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Originally Posted by txtrophy85
This weekend in camp, one boy helped me clean out the cabin, trim brush and cut cedars. The other boy sat around, tossed his football and took a nap.

Guess which one gets the preferential treatment when it comes to hunting? I didnt tell the other one no, he can’t go out, but I’m not going out of my way to put him on anything. And he keeps it up at this current pace I will leave him at home

I reward based on performance and laziness is a choice



Well said cuz thats what we do in our house to. Work hard=play hard

Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: Texas Dan] #8048513 11/12/20 09:06 PM
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My kids are growing up with a lot more opportunities than I had in general as a kid and in the outdoors specifically, so we are very intentional about trying to make sure they truly appreciate each and every opportunity. The moment we sense any hint of self-entitlement or lack of appreciation, those opportunities get shut down for awhile. And if I'm ever tempted to spoil them a little more than I should, my amazing (much smarter) wife is there to set me straight...quick.




Last edited by Grosvenor; 11/12/20 09:07 PM.
Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: txtrophy85] #8048582 11/12/20 09:52 PM
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My oldest lives and breathes hunting while the younger one likes it just not to the same extent. We don't treat hunting any differently than we do any other extra curricular activity they want to do. If they're not keeping up with their school obligations, etc. then they don't get to go hunting. I'm not going to reward bad behavior by allowing privileges even if it's a privilege that I really enjoy doing with them. They're taught that work/family responsibilities come first. If I don't do my job and do extra on certain weeks then I dont get to go hunting either, their job is to do good in school and fulfill their responsibilities around the house.

That said I've only had to leave one of them at home for something like that a handful of times but I think when I did it drove the point home .

Re: The value in kids earning their hunting opportunities [Re: kk66] #8050324 11/14/20 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by kk66
If they're not keeping up with their school obligations, etc. then they don't get to go hunting.


Hunting and just about every other activity we enjoy is dependent on our ability to work and hold down a job. For that reason, it would only make sense that kids be allowed to hunt when they remain in good standing with their own obligations.

Last edited by Texas Dan; 11/14/20 12:44 PM.

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