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extension cord needed for 220V compressor? #7967614 09/09/20 11:57 PM
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Tin Head Offline OP
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I need , or want to get a extension cord for a 220v compressor at home. I have a YUGE cord now, its like a inch or more in diameter . Looking for something with a smaller diameter with out burning the motor up. I only need it to go 25 and really it will be a little less than that.

240v
60hz
15 AMPS
3450 rpm
ph 01
output 2.98 kw
LR AMPS 93

Im looking at this one.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Heavy-Duty-25FT-50-Amp-10-3-Welder-Extension-Cord-MIG-TIG-Plasma-220-Volt/164355076675?hash=item2644537243:g:8ncAAOSwERtfR1yh


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Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Tin Head] #7967664 09/10/20 12:25 AM
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Good luck. Haven't used one lately. Most things are now cordless.


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Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: bill oxner] #7967754 09/10/20 12:53 AM
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Originally Posted by bill oxner
Good luck. Haven't used one lately. Most things are now cordless.

That was helpful!

Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Tin Head] #7967777 09/10/20 01:02 AM
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The one you looked at is reasonable a 50 foot roll of 10/3 is $91 at home depot, or almost $2 a foot.


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Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Tin Head] #7967930 09/10/20 02:42 AM
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10/2 romax and hard wire it.


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Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Tin Head] #7967969 09/10/20 03:15 AM
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12/3 is really all should need. Biggest draw back with the 50 amp selected is the male and female ends. It probably will not match your compressor cord. What does you compressor female end look like, and the wall plug.

The weakest point on factory cords are the ends. I would probably build one. 12/3 cord with heavy duty orange ends. Usually available at box stores.

If you rather a store bought, look for a 20 amp 240 volt.cord. That will probably match your ends.

Also, keep as short as practical. A big mistake, often consumer buys a too long heavy cord, then coil it up. If you have 15 feet or so tightly coiled up on floor or wall, recatance due to current flow will cause voltage drop.

Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Tin Head] #7967980 09/10/20 03:24 AM
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Lazyjack, you saying it’s better off strung out vs coiled up? or delete the length of unneeded wire for resistance purposes? Trying to wrap my head around that new word.


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Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: bill oxner] #7968052 09/10/20 05:24 AM
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Originally Posted by bill oxner
Good luck. Haven't used one lately. Most things are now cordless.



wtf

Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Bullfrog] #7968054 09/10/20 05:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Bullfrog
Lazyjack, you saying it’s better off strung out vs coiled up? or delete the length of unneeded wire for resistance purposes? Trying to wrap my head around that new word.



Lazyjack made some good points. 12/3 or 10/3 for a compressor will work fine. I think what Mr Lazyjack is trying to say is that on a higher amperage service especially, rolled up excess wire yes can cause some voltage drop but not that big of a problem with AC circuits as long as it's not too long (DC is different). Cut your cord at least close to length, and you will have better service.

The problem with higher amperage circuits with excess wire coiled up tight together is that it starts to make a transformer under load and can start a fire. I have personally witnessed a 480v temporary feeder to a Motor Control Center catch fire. The "company" that installed that cable had close to 100' of excess 3c 4/0 cable that they coiled up nice & pretty on the deck. Once we started turning heaters on & running motors - loading the gear that roll of cable started smoking and burst into flames as I was walking by. Caught the feeder breaker on fire, smoked out the whole building, and ended up shutting down the whole platform causing everyone to evacuate. Some dipshit roughneck grabbed a water hose and was going to extinguish the fire. Thank God I saw him & stopped him. Anyway..... light weight service not a big deal. Heavier service pay more attention to installation.

Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Jimbo1] #7968177 09/10/20 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Jimbo1
Originally Posted by bill oxner
Good luck. Haven't used one lately. Most things are now cordless.

That was helpful!


That's with 98% of his posts.

Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Bullfrog] #7968427 09/10/20 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Bullfrog
Lazyjack, you saying it’s better off strung out vs coiled up? or delete the length of unneeded wire for resistance purposes? Trying to wrap my head around that new word.



Not resistance, reactance. In a coil of wire with AC current, the induced magnetic fields will act like a choke. It become more prevolent if cord is wadded into a pile.

Resistance is relative to DC or pure resistive loads such as a heater or incandescent lamp.
Reactance comes in play in motor windings and old school electronics and coils for relays.

If you measure motor windings with a meter, you are appling a meter battery power, usualy 9 VDC. In case you are measuing resistance. Using Ohms Law, expected current flow is extremly high.

Well, actually, as I sure know, starting amperage is Locked Rotor from 2/3 second. Infact it happens so most meters will not record peak. After rotor beings to spin, reactance causes the amperage to fall. Now I am speaking of AC motors, Not DC.

Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Lazyjack] #7968436 09/10/20 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Lazyjack
Originally Posted by Bullfrog
Lazyjack, you saying it’s better off strung out vs coiled up? or delete the length of unneeded wire for resistance purposes? Trying to wrap my head around that new word.



Not resistance, reactance. In a coil of wire with AC current, the induced magnetic fields will act like a choke. It become more prevolent if cord is wadded into a pile.

Resistance is relative to DC or pure resistive loads such as a heater or incandescent lamp.
Reactance comes in play in motor windings and old school electronics and coils for relays.

If you measure motor windings with a meter, you are appling a meter battery power, usualy 9 VDC. In case you are measuing resistance. Using Ohms Law, expected current flow is extremly high.

Well, actually, as I sure know, starting amperage is Locked Rotor from 2/3 second. Infact it happens so most meters will not record peak. After rotor beings to spin, reactance causes the amperage to fall. Now I am speaking of AC motors, Not DC.




Learned something new today. Thanks.


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Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: skinnerback] #7968445 09/10/20 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by skinnerback
Originally Posted by Bullfrog
Lazyjack, you saying it’s better off strung out vs coiled up? or delete the length of unneeded wire for resistance purposes? Trying to wrap my head around that new word.



Lazyjack made some good points. 12/3 or 10/3 for a compressor will work fine. I think what Mr Lazyjack is trying to say is that on a higher amperage service especially, rolled up excess wire yes can cause some voltage drop but not that big of a problem with AC circuits as long as it's not too long (DC is different). Cut your cord at least close to length, and you will have better service.

The problem with higher amperage circuits with excess wire coiled up tight together is that it starts to make a transformer under load and can start a fire. I have personally witnessed a 480v temporary feeder to a Motor Control Center catch fire. The "company" that installed that cable had close to 100' of excess 3c 4/0 cable that they coiled up nice & pretty on the deck. Once we started turning heaters on & running motors - loading the gear that roll of cable started smoking and burst into flames as I was walking by. Caught the feeder breaker on fire, smoked out the whole building, and ended up shutting down the whole platform causing everyone to evacuate. Some dipshit roughneck grabbed a water hose and was going to extinguish the fire. Thank God I saw him & stopped him. Anyway..... light weight service not a big deal. Heavier service pay more attention to installation.


Very good post. And an excellent example of reactance. A 10 amp load on 100 feet of 16/3 could have same results. Heavy is relative, like hot or cold, short or tall.

In this case, the coiled excess cord causes motor starting issues due high starting amperage. Of course, high starting amperage is relative to running amperage.

Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Tin Head] #7968482 09/10/20 03:50 PM
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Here is good demo. This is low AC voltage, but physics are the same and results simular with high volages provided frequency remains 60 HZ.


Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Tin Head] #7968487 09/10/20 03:55 PM
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I also just reread my original post. I said 15 feet I ment 50 feet. Brain cramp. Guess I was channelling a presidential candidate.

Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Lazyjack] #7968771 09/10/20 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Lazyjack
I also just reread my original post. I said 15 feet I ment 50 feet. Brain cramp. Guess I was channelling a presidential candidate.



roflmao up

Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: TXHOGSLAYER] #7969050 09/10/20 11:36 PM
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Originally Posted by TXHOGSLAYER
Originally Posted by Lazyjack
Originally Posted by Bullfrog
Lazyjack, you saying it’s better off strung out vs coiled up? or delete the length of unneeded wire for resistance purposes? Trying to wrap my head around that new word.



Not resistance, reactance. In a coil of wire with AC current, the induced magnetic fields will act like a choke. It become more prevolent if cord is wadded into a pile.

Resistance is relative to DC or pure resistive loads such as a heater or incandescent lamp.
Reactance comes in play in motor windings and old school electronics and coils for relays.

If you measure motor windings with a meter, you are appling a meter battery power, usualy 9 VDC. In case you are measuing resistance. Using Ohms Law, expected current flow is extremly high.

Well, actually, as I sure know, starting amperage is Locked Rotor from 2/3 second. Infact it happens so most meters will not record peak. After rotor beings to spin, reactance causes the amperage to fall. Now I am speaking of AC motors, Not DC.




Learned something new today. Thanks.

As did I , thanks for the help guys


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Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Tin Head] #7975988 09/16/20 01:25 PM
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I would personally leave the compressor close to the power source and get a longer air hose.


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Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Tin Head] #7980597 09/19/20 10:09 PM
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One thing mentioned in this thread that almost everyone could benefit from is Lazyjack said “ohms law”

Good stuff


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Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Tin Head] #7980620 09/19/20 10:44 PM
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You guys kill me. The OP asks about a simple extension cord. Y’all tell him how to built the ISS. Y’all have talked conductor resistance, inductive reactance, current and heat. Y’all left out capacitance, those wires run side you side you know. Oh! Let’s not forget solar interference and solar flares.

Did anybody answer his question?

He just needs recommendations for a 50’ extension cord for his compressor.

I recommend 10/3 copper rated for outdoor use in a bright color and appropriate connectors. I find it’s usually cheaper to buy a 10/3x50’ extension cord and replace the ends if necessary.


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Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: Tin Head] #7980628 09/19/20 10:53 PM
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I also use mine for my cheep air compressor.


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Re: extension cord needed for 220V compressor? [Re: pdr55] #7980697 09/20/20 12:27 AM
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Originally Posted by pdr55
I would personally leave the compressor close to the power source and get a longer air hose.

Best advice on this thread.


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