texashuntingforum.com logo
Main Menu
Advertisement
Affiliates
Advertisement
Newest Members
Misty97, Doneit, Nack, Land$, Texas Abe
66339 Registered Users
Top Posters(All Time)
dogcatcher 97,173
bill oxner 63,118
stxranchman 55,458
SnakeWrangler 50,534
RKHarm24 44,585
rifleman 44,446
BMD 41,033
Big Orn 37,484
Facebook
Forum Statistics
Forums45
Topics447,278
Posts6,489,048
Members66,339
Most Online19,184
Feb 5th, 2020
Print Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Barrel break in #7749965 02/19/20 05:14 AM
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,574
J
J.R. Online Content OP
Pro Tracker
OP Online Content
Pro Tracker
J
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,574
50 years old, and after dozens of guns, this was my first real barrel break-in process. Bergara B-14 Hunter 6.5CM. I scrubbed, greased and dry-swabbed the bore after every 3 shots for 9 shots, then every 6 shots for 18 more shots, then shot to pattern waiting 5 minutes between shots. As I did, the groups tightened up. On the right are shots 46 and 47. The Mickey Mouse is shots 48-50. I shot Hornady 143gr. ELD-X.

Do I even bother trying other loads, or call it good with this one?

[Linked Image]




"First come smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire."
Re: Barrel break in [Re: J.R.] #7749970 02/19/20 05:20 AM
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,167
T
Tin Head Online Happy
THF Trophy Hunter
Online Happy
THF Trophy Hunter
T
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,167
Whats the yardage your shooting at? I would log these and just try some other stuff.


[Linked Image]Justice. It's time to wake up. These people are sick. SAVE THE KIDS
Re: Barrel break in [Re: Tin Head] #7749976 02/19/20 05:41 AM
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,574
J
J.R. Online Content OP
Pro Tracker
OP Online Content
Pro Tracker
J
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,574
100 yds.




"First come smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire."
Re: Barrel break in [Re: J.R.] #7749990 02/19/20 06:32 AM
Joined: Apr 2013
Posts: 1,716
T
tenyearsgone Offline
Pro Tracker
Offline
Pro Tracker
T
Joined: Apr 2013
Posts: 1,716
Your swabbing and doing a rain dance after so many shots didn't have the littlest impact. You simply saw the groups tightened as the barrel got fouled. I've shot tighter groups after doing nothing more than giving the barrel a good clean prior.

Re: Barrel break in [Re: J.R.] #7749996 02/19/20 09:13 AM
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 2,219
onlysmith&wesson Online Content
Veteran Tracker
Online Content
Veteran Tracker
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 2,219
My Tikka T3, in a Bell and Carlson Medalist stock with High Desert Rifle Works bottom metal shoots that ammo just as well. I can also tell you that it's a hammer, great killer. I've dumped a lot of good sized boars with it and it performs very well.


An unethical shot is one you take, that you know you shouldn't.
Re: Barrel break in [Re: onlysmith&wesson] #7750036 02/19/20 12:25 PM
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,574
J
J.R. Online Content OP
Pro Tracker
OP Online Content
Pro Tracker
J
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,574
Originally Posted by onlysmith&wesson
My Tikka T3, in a Bell and Carlson Medalist stock with High Desert Rifle Works bottom metal shoots that ammo just as well. I can also tell you that it's a hammer, great killer. I've dumped a lot of good sized boars with it and it performs very well.


Good to know, as a hog hunt is next on the list:)




"First come smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire."
Re: Barrel break in [Re: onlysmith&wesson] #7750105 02/19/20 01:45 PM
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 9,128
G
Grizz Offline
THF Trophy Hunter
Offline
THF Trophy Hunter
G
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 9,128
Originally Posted by onlysmith&wesson
My Tikka T3, in a Bell and Carlson Medalist stock with High Desert Rifle Works bottom metal shoots that ammo just as well. I can also tell you that it's a hammer, great killer. I've dumped a lot of good sized boars with it and it performs very well.


I'll second this. I've been using the 143 ELD-X (hand loads) in my B14 Ridge and they are excellent hunting bullets. Almost all of my shots have been behind the shoulder on deer and pigs. One deer dropped in his tracks and the rest ran a little way, but the ones that ran left blood trails Stevie Wonder could track.


Re: Barrel break in [Re: J.R.] #7750151 02/19/20 01:58 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 32,937
R
redchevy Online Content
THF Celebrity
Online Content
THF Celebrity
R
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 32,937
For barrel break in all I do now is clean It before I shoot it. Ive only cleaned 2 of the ones I own before shooting. They all shoot great even the ones I never cleaned before shooting.


It's hell eatin em live
Re: Barrel break in [Re: J.R.] #7750174 02/19/20 02:13 PM
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,386
D
DStroud Online Content
Veteran Tracker
Online Content
Veteran Tracker
D
Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,386
I change my oil in a new vehicle every 3 miles for the first 50-60 miles and they run great. whistle


"Anyone taking up handloading necessarily plays with unknown factors and takes chances. But so does anyone who drives a car,goes to a cocktail party,eats in a restaurant,or gets married."

Jack O'Connor 1963
Re: Barrel break in [Re: J.R.] #7750200 02/19/20 02:29 PM
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 16,352
T
Texas Dan Offline
THF Celebrity
Offline
THF Celebrity
T
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 16,352
Originally Posted by J.R.
As I did, the groups tightened up.


Just to confirm, you found the groups got better after each cleaning during the break in process, meaning it wasn't an increase in fouling that created the improvement. That has been my experience as well.

The greatest value in breaking in a barrel is that it creates one that's far less likely to create a cold-bore flyer. You can clean and store the rifle knowing the next shot taken will be just as accurate as the last one.

IMO, breaking in a barrel is much the same as breaking in a new engine where crankshaft surfaces are allowed to more perfectly "bed" with the rod bearings. Back in the day when production processes were not as good as they are today, new cars often came with special break-in oil that you were supposed to change after 500 miles. While production methods are no doubt much better these days, nothing is perfect. A process that allows a new barrel to wear initially into a more perfect state results in greater long-term accuracy and performance.

Last edited by Texas Dan; 02/19/20 02:44 PM.

Dan

Re: Barrel break in [Re: Texas Dan] #7750205 02/19/20 02:32 PM
Joined: Jun 2015
Posts: 2,208
J
Jgraider Online Content
Veteran Tracker
Online Content
Veteran Tracker
J
Joined: Jun 2015
Posts: 2,208
Originally Posted by Texas Dan
Originally Posted by J.R.
As I did, the groups tightened up.


Just to confirm, you found the groups got better after each cleaning during the break in process, meaning it wasn't an increase in fouling that created the improvement. That has been my experience as well.

The greatest value in breaking in a barrel is that it creates one that's far less likely to create a cold-bore flyer. You can clean and store the rifle knowing the next shot taken will be just as accurate as the last one.


Hogwash.....complete waste of time, ammo, and cleaning supplies.

Re: Barrel break in [Re: J.R.] #7750227 02/19/20 02:50 PM
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 16,352
T
Texas Dan Offline
THF Celebrity
Offline
THF Celebrity
T
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 16,352
When manufacturers reach the point where their production processes can produce rifles that all shoot with the same level of accuracy (or there is no need to pay more for a custom barrel), there will no longer be a need to break in a new factory barrel.

Last edited by Texas Dan; 02/19/20 02:51 PM.

Dan

Re: Barrel break in [Re: Texas Dan] #7750234 02/19/20 02:55 PM
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,574
J
J.R. Online Content OP
Pro Tracker
OP Online Content
Pro Tracker
J
Joined: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,574
Originally Posted by Texas Dan
Originally Posted by J.R.
As I did, the groups tightened up.


Just to confirm, you found the groups got better after each cleaning during the break in process, meaning it wasn't an increase in fouling that created the improvement. That has been my experience as well.

The greatest value in breaking in a barrel is that it creates one that's far less likely to create a cold-bore flyer. You can clean and store the rifle knowing the next shot taken will be just as accurate as the last one.

IMO, breaking in a barrel is much the same as breaking in a new engine where crankshaft surfaces are allowed to more perfectly "bed" with the rod bearings. Back in the day when production processes were not as good as they are today, new cars often came with special break-in oil that you were supposed to change after 500 miles. While production methods are no doubt much better these days, nothing is perfect. A process that allows a new barrel to wear initially into a more perfect state results in greater long-term accuracy and performance.


I agree 100%, and thanks for confirming my thoughts. Some may feel it was a waste of time and ammo, but I figured that if I didn't take the time to follow the process and this gun shot 1.5" (or worse), then I would always wonder if I could have gotten more from it. This way, I'm confident that I gave the gun the best chance to deliver on its sub-MOA guarantee.




"First come smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire."
Re: Barrel break in [Re: J.R.] #7750244 02/19/20 03:01 PM
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 16,352
T
Texas Dan Offline
THF Celebrity
Offline
THF Celebrity
T
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 16,352
Originally Posted by J.R.
Originally Posted by Texas Dan
Originally Posted by J.R.
As I did, the groups tightened up.


Just to confirm, you found the groups got better after each cleaning during the break in process, meaning it wasn't an increase in fouling that created the improvement. That has been my experience as well.

The greatest value in breaking in a barrel is that it creates one that's far less likely to create a cold-bore flyer. You can clean and store the rifle knowing the next shot taken will be just as accurate as the last one.

IMO, breaking in a barrel is much the same as breaking in a new engine where crankshaft surfaces are allowed to more perfectly "bed" with the rod bearings. Back in the day when production processes were not as good as they are today, new cars often came with special break-in oil that you were supposed to change after 500 miles. While production methods are no doubt much better these days, nothing is perfect. A process that allows a new barrel to wear initially into a more perfect state results in greater long-term accuracy and performance.


I agree 100%, and thanks for confirming my thoughts. Some may feel it was a waste of time and ammo, but I figured that if I didn't take the time to follow the process and this gun shot 1.5" (or worse), then I would always wonder if I could have gotten more from it. This way, I'm confident that I gave the gun the best chance to deliver on its sub-MOA guarantee.


Anyone who doubts the value of breaking in a new barrel should spend a spend minutes with those old timers they often see at the range who probably shoot every week. That is, if they have time to talk when they're not swabbing a new barrel.

Last edited by Texas Dan; 02/19/20 03:02 PM.

Dan

Re: Barrel break in [Re: Jgraider] #7750259 02/19/20 03:17 PM
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 7,080
W
wp75169 Online Content
THF Trophy Hunter
Online Content
THF Trophy Hunter
W
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 7,080
Originally Posted by Jgraider
Originally Posted by Texas Dan
Originally Posted by J.R.
As I did, the groups tightened up.


Just to confirm, you found the groups got better after each cleaning during the break in process, meaning it wasn't an increase in fouling that created the improvement. That has been my experience as well.

The greatest value in breaking in a barrel is that it creates one that's far less likely to create a cold-bore flyer. You can clean and store the rifle knowing the next shot taken will be just as accurate as the last one.


Hogwash.....complete waste of time, ammo, and cleaning supplies.


Dan that only counts if you don’t like to shoot your rifle often or accurately. Cold bore flyers on an accurate rifle will be around .5 moa. That’s cold bore. A clean bore will be significantly different but irrelevant if you do not intend to shoot enough to foul it before you clean it again. I feel that you’re right that this method suits your needs very well, but that you are also leave accuracy on the table that is understandably unneeded by most hunters. This forum is full of people that do not understand that there are two factions and both are correct for their needs and or wants. Although I don’t subscribe to your side I understand it. The rifle is a tool that gets the job done for you, and it really does. No different than the vehicle that took you there. I don’t function that way, a fast car is never fast enough, an accurate gun is never accurate enough, etc. many people function with a +/- range in life, I function with a zero. It’s right or it’s wrong.

Sorry for the rambling, I still do not have a decided barrel break in procedure. No matter the outcome I wonder had I done it differently what would the results be.

Fact: more animals have been killed with 3moa rifles than will ever be killed with .3moa rifles.

Re: Barrel break in [Re: Texas Dan] #7750269 02/19/20 03:20 PM
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 32,937
R
redchevy Online Content
THF Celebrity
Online Content
THF Celebrity
R
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 32,937
Originally Posted by Texas Dan
When manufacturers reach the point where their production processes can produce rifles that all shoot with the same level of accuracy (or there is no need to pay more for a custom barrel), there will no longer be a need to break in a new factory barrel.


Im not saying there is no improvement in custom guns etc., but there are some amazingly great shooting cheaper than dirt factory guns being put out.


It's hell eatin em live
Re: Barrel break in [Re: redchevy] #7750303 02/19/20 03:48 PM
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 16,352
T
Texas Dan Offline
THF Celebrity
Offline
THF Celebrity
T
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 16,352
Originally Posted by redchevy
Originally Posted by Texas Dan
When manufacturers reach the point where their production processes can produce rifles that all shoot with the same level of accuracy (or there is no need to pay more for a custom barrel), there will no longer be a need to break in a new factory barrel.


Im not saying there is no improvement in custom guns etc., but there are some amazingly great shooting cheaper than dirt factory guns being put out.


Yes, production processes are no doubt better than ever. Still, there remains space for the new gun owner who wants to spend a little more time and effort to create a shooter that rewards them for going that extra mile.

The decision to follow a break-in process was an easy one for me because I hate to store any firearm with a dirty barrel.

Last edited by Texas Dan; 02/19/20 05:05 PM.

Dan

Re: Barrel break in [Re: J.R.] #7750478 02/19/20 06:32 PM
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 30,893
F
FiremanJG Online Content
THF Celebrity
Online Content
THF Celebrity
F
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 30,893
Originally Posted by J.R.
Originally Posted by Texas Dan
Originally Posted by J.R.
As I did, the groups tightened up.


Just to confirm, you found the groups got better after each cleaning during the break in process, meaning it wasn't an increase in fouling that created the improvement. That has been my experience as well.

The greatest value in breaking in a barrel is that it creates one that's far less likely to create a cold-bore flyer. You can clean and store the rifle knowing the next shot taken will be just as accurate as the last one.

IMO, breaking in a barrel is much the same as breaking in a new engine where crankshaft surfaces are allowed to more perfectly "bed" with the rod bearings. Back in the day when production processes were not as good as they are today, new cars often came with special break-in oil that you were supposed to change after 500 miles. While production methods are no doubt much better these days, nothing is perfect. A process that allows a new barrel to wear initially into a more perfect state results in greater long-term accuracy and performance.


I agree 100%, and thanks for confirming my thoughts. Some may feel it was a waste of time and ammo, but I figured that if I didn't take the time to follow the process and this gun shot 1.5" (or worse), then I would always wonder if I could have gotten more from it. This way, I'm confident that I gave the gun the best chance to deliver on its sub-MOA guarantee.


If the rifle is a 1.5 MOA shooter, that is what it will be, whether you broke in the barrel or not. Same holds true for a 1/4 MOA shooter.

Clean a new barrel, and shoot it. Clean it again when it begins to shoot poorly. That could be 20 rounds later, or 500 rounds later.


[Linked Image]
800 Yard Steel Range
Precision Rifle Instruction
Memberships and Classes Available
Re: Barrel break in [Re: Texas Dan] #7750481 02/19/20 06:35 PM
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 30,893
F
FiremanJG Online Content
THF Celebrity
Online Content
THF Celebrity
F
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 30,893
Originally Posted by Texas Dan
Originally Posted by J.R.
Originally Posted by Texas Dan
Originally Posted by J.R.
As I did, the groups tightened up.


Just to confirm, you found the groups got better after each cleaning during the break in process, meaning it wasn't an increase in fouling that created the improvement. That has been my experience as well.

The greatest value in breaking in a barrel is that it creates one that's far less likely to create a cold-bore flyer. You can clean and store the rifle knowing the next shot taken will be just as accurate as the last one.

IMO, breaking in a barrel is much the same as breaking in a new engine where crankshaft surfaces are allowed to more perfectly "bed" with the rod bearings. Back in the day when production processes were not as good as they are today, new cars often came with special break-in oil that you were supposed to change after 500 miles. While production methods are no doubt much better these days, nothing is perfect. A process that allows a new barrel to wear initially into a more perfect state results in greater long-term accuracy and performance.


I agree 100%, and thanks for confirming my thoughts. Some may feel it was a waste of time and ammo, but I figured that if I didn't take the time to follow the process and this gun shot 1.5" (or worse), then I would always wonder if I could have gotten more from it. This way, I'm confident that I gave the gun the best chance to deliver on its sub-MOA guarantee.


Anyone who doubts the value of breaking in a new barrel should spend a spend minutes with those old timers they often see at the range who probably shoot every week. That is, if they have time to talk when they're not swabbing a new barrel.


Those old timers are welcome to go to many rifle ranges across the country and play HORSE with a bunch of guys that never broke in their barrels, nor have they cleaned their barrels in several hundred rounds. The winners will have nothing to do with barrel break in or not.

Dan, have you ever shot out a rifle barrel? popcorn


[Linked Image]
800 Yard Steel Range
Precision Rifle Instruction
Memberships and Classes Available
Re: Barrel break in [Re: J.R.] #7750618 02/19/20 08:43 PM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,869
H
huck18 Online Content
Veteran Tracker
Online Content
Veteran Tracker
H
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,869
The whole barrel break in thing is an old wives tale. It's pointless and does nothing. It has no basis in reality. This has been studied quite a bit.

https://forum.snipershide.com/threads/objective-research-on-barrel-break-in-procedures.27321/

Re: Barrel break in [Re: FiremanJG] #7750638 02/19/20 09:12 PM
Joined: Jun 2015
Posts: 2,208
J
Jgraider Online Content
Veteran Tracker
Online Content
Veteran Tracker
J
Joined: Jun 2015
Posts: 2,208
Yes.....

Originally Posted by FiremanJG


If the rifle is a 1.5 MOA shooter, that is what it will be, whether you broke in the barrel or not. Same holds true for a 1/4 MOA shooter.

Clean a new barrel, and shoot it. Clean it again when it begins to shoot poorly. That could be 20 rounds later, or 500 rounds later.



And Yes.........

Originally Posted by FiremanJG


Those old timers are welcome to go to many rifle ranges across the country and play HORSE with a bunch of guys that never broke in their barrels, nor have they cleaned their barrels in several hundred rounds. The winners will have nothing to do with barrel break in or not.

Re: Barrel break in [Re: Texas Dan] #7750643 02/19/20 09:21 PM
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 46,398
BOBO the Clown Online Content
decoy
Online Content
decoy
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 46,398
Originally Posted by Texas Dan
Originally Posted by J.R.
Originally Posted by Texas Dan
Originally Posted by J.R.
As I did, the groups tightened up.


Just to confirm, you found the groups got better after each cleaning during the break in process, meaning it wasn't an increase in fouling that created the improvement. That has been my experience as well.

The greatest value in breaking in a barrel is that it creates one that's far less likely to create a cold-bore flyer. You can clean and store the rifle knowing the next shot taken will be just as accurate as the last one.

IMO, breaking in a barrel is much the same as breaking in a new engine where crankshaft surfaces are allowed to more perfectly "bed" with the rod bearings. Back in the day when production processes were not as good as they are today, new cars often came with special break-in oil that you were supposed to change after 500 miles. While production methods are no doubt much better these days, nothing is perfect. A process that allows a new barrel to wear initially into a more perfect state results in greater long-term accuracy and performance.


I agree 100%, and thanks for confirming my thoughts. Some may feel it was a waste of time and ammo, but I figured that if I didn't take the time to follow the process and this gun shot 1.5" (or worse), then I would always wonder if I could have gotten more from it. This way, I'm confident that I gave the gun the best chance to deliver on its sub-MOA guarantee.


Anyone who doubts the value of breaking in a new barrel should spend a spend minutes with those old timers they often see at the range who probably shoot every week. That is, if they have time to talk when they're not swabbing a new barrel.


Newsflash it’s 2020 AD, he have AI, Robots with AI and machining tolerances that many cant phantom


Donate to TX Youth hunting program.... better to donate then to waste it in taxes

https://secure.qgiv.com/for/gtgoh/mobile
Re: Barrel break in [Re: J.R.] #7750692 02/19/20 10:13 PM
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,110
K
Korean Redneck Online Content
Veteran Tracker
Online Content
Veteran Tracker
K
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,110
I'm fairly convinced theoretically that barrel break in is not actually a real thing that is required. That said, I still do it out of pure superstition but the routine I follow is not a onerous as it used to be. something more like cleaning at the range after 3-5 for the first 20ish shots. At some point after the first dozen or 2, it always seemed to tighten up. I assume it had more to do with microscopic machining marks in the rifling, which I just can NOT see how that can be deburred by a brass/nylon brush and chemicals.

Re: Barrel break in [Re: Korean Redneck] #7750949 02/20/20 01:54 AM
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 2,219
onlysmith&wesson Online Content
Veteran Tracker
Online Content
Veteran Tracker
Joined: Jul 2014
Posts: 2,219
Originally Posted by Korean Redneck
I'm fairly convinced theoretically that barrel break in is not actually a real thing that is required. That said, I still do it out of pure superstition but the routine I follow is not a onerous as it used to be. something more like cleaning at the range after 3-5 for the first 20ish shots. At some point after the first dozen or 2, it always seemed to tighten up. I assume it had more to do with microscopic machining marks in the rifling, which I just can NOT see how that can be deburred by a brass/nylon brush and chemicals.


Agree


An unethical shot is one you take, that you know you shouldn't.
Re: Barrel break in [Re: J.R.] #7750977 02/20/20 02:20 AM
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 4,957
T
Tactical Cowboy Online Content
Extreme Tracker
Online Content
Extreme Tracker
T
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 4,957
But Dan says so.


The secret to a long life is to try not to shorten it.
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Previous Thread
Index
Next Thread

© 2004-2019 OUTDOOR SITES NETWORK all rights reserved USA and Worldwide
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.3