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Mar 25th, 2012
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How do you compare to the one that taught you? #7667214 11/20/19 03:02 AM
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The thread in the picture section about the 1950’s and the 3 gun battery got me thinking.

I’m going to assume most of us were taught by a parent, grandparent or uncle.

So how do you compare to the previous generations? Are you a more avid hunter, about equal or less passionate about it than they were?

The two people who got me into it ( during different times of my life ) were my dad and uncle.

Dad was a bird hunter primarily then switched to deer later in life, mainly hunting on his friends properties. I don’t think he killed a buck deer until he was in his mid 30’s. He did like to chase his quail and you didn’t have to twist his arm to get him outdoors, but He was pretty content with the simple things in life and it didn’t take much to make him happy.

My uncle had a more adventurous streak and went to Colorado and Wyoming several times, as well as owning several ranches he hunted on as well. He was a pretty quintessential example of a late 80’s - late 90’s south Texas deer hunter. Still, I would say his hunting was more of a fond hobby than a real passion. His ranch was his passion but not the hunting aspect in and of itself.

I would fall as a more passionate hunter than either of the above mentioned two.

Curious to see how others fall into the spectrum regarding their hunting mentors

Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667250 11/20/19 03:34 AM
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I learned from my dad and he is still just as passionate today as I am but he is really old now. He has been my true hunting buddy since I was 12. I would consider us equal. I have also learned a lot about waterfowl from a friend that's a wildlife biologist but he is more about the good times than the chase, which is fine.

Last edited by rolyat.nosaj; 11/20/19 03:34 AM.
Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667252 11/20/19 03:36 AM
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Daddy was my main teacher - both grandads were also a big part of my becoming a hunter along with several other dads. The dads took all us kids to a central Texas deer lease every Thanksgiving. It was a bigger deal to us than Christmas, and as a result several of us picked up hunting as a passion. Later we got an east TX lease closer to home so we could go every weekend.

Many of us are probably more accomplished as hunters than our mentors if size and variety of animals is the measuring stick, but none of us would ever claim to be better hunters. Their skills were honed during the Depression and post-war era when spending time in the woods was just what every boy did. You can’t help but get pretty dang woods-wise when being outdoors is just a way of life.

My passion for hunting is probably higher than theirs was, but as I get older I am beginning to realize the root of that passion is probably an attempt to recapture the times spent with those now gone and to honor their memory. Which is a big reason I am glad my wife and daughters also enjoy hunting, so those times can continue.


Originally Posted By: Russ79
I learned long ago you can't reason someone out of something they don't reason themselves into.


Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667255 11/20/19 03:42 AM
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That last statement about recapturing old memories that NP said hit the nail on the head for me. Things aren't the same now but I still chase it every year.

Last edited by rolyat.nosaj; 11/20/19 03:42 AM.
Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667261 11/20/19 03:47 AM
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great thread and really got me to be more introspective. My uncle was a game biologist for TVA and later on the federal govt. His job was to entertain high profile clients of both which meant senators, congressman and generally well-helled types. The lands he got us access to were amazing. I've been immersed in it my entire life but would never be as knowledgeable as him. But now that I think about it, hes probably more patient than me (except when it comes to safety and he was brutally strict), so I need to work on that. But my 8 year old is absolutely eaten up with it and pretty accomplished for his age and definitely respects the sport so I'm not totally messing him up. Thanks again for the post, lots of great motivation in your question.

Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667274 11/20/19 04:12 AM
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My grandma was probably the main one that I looked up to, and who fueled it for me. I was mostly just a fisherman growing up to be honest. We owned no land and grandma owned one firearm- a .38 revolver- for two legged vermin. I did kill a ton of birds with a pellet gun, and a handful of other small game. Between my grandma and my neighbors- probably moreso my neighbors- they gave me a nice hit list of birds that had to be gone and probably because they crapped on everything and there were a ton of them. Mostly english sparrows "dookie birds" and any grackle or crow or anything probably resembling one to be honest. We were pretty much surrounded by sunflowers in mesquite in the 80's, and the land was stepped. Tons of dookie birds, grackles, and crows.

My grandma was the best mentor a young boy could have possibly hoped for. We never went on a deer or elk or even a dove hunt but she was the primary influence in my life regards to the value of life and what needs to be killed.

Used to tell us (me and my cousins who she took care of all of us) stories about the farm, killing stray cats with a 12 gauge because they ate chickens, etc. Grandma was my hero.

She kicked a dudes [censored] that tried to carjack and rape her. And about clawed his eyes out. I will never forget it. Also also kicked my (then) stepdads [censored] when I was Probably 3 or 4 for beating me with a coathanger for no reason. And took me in and rescued me from a life that probably would have got me in prison to be honest.

Another funny story- grandma used to tell us stories about life on the farm, eating turtle soup etc. she apparently was fond of softshell turtles. Well, one time I went to pull a stringer of cats up and I could not retrieve it no matter how hard I pulled. I reached around in the undercut tried to untagle my stringer from the roots when the biggest snapper I have seen before or since stuck his head up out of the water with my stringer in his mouth. It was an alligator snapper and It was huge! I am 39 and to this day have never noodled for cats just because of this one incident.
I gave up and left, and on my way back my best bud's dad saw me. He was like where is your fish at Catfish? I told him about the turtle and he gave me his longest pair of channel locks and the biggest treble hook he had. Told me to bait it up with meat and go back, the turtle will take it. Grab him in the mouth with these channel locks and drag him home.

I went home and made a leader from 18 gauge wire my grandma made her electric fence from. I basically twisted that to my new treble hook and twisted a loop in the other end. Put some 25 pound shakespeare omniflex on my zebco 404. And put as much bacon ends and pieces on the treble hook as I could make fit and went back.

I caught that damn turtle. Tried to lift him up out of the water with my pole and it broke right at the metal joint! But that 25 pound line held. I grabbed him in the mouth with those channel locks and drug him out of the water and all the way home, through a good mile of woods and probably at least a half mile of roads and back alleys. For reference my secret catfish hole was near 635 in some woods and grandma lived on Bruton Road. Drug that snapper from 635 on the bank of that creek, past mcwhorter elementary, to grandmas house and I think I was probably in the 3rd or 4th grade. This time fram the sunflowers were all gone and they were putting up apartments and subdivisions. Anyways I was completely exhausted dragging that big turtle that far.

I thought she'd be pround but no sir- grandma pointed at the road and told me to drag that damn turle back to the creek where I found it! She didnt want nothing to do with it! I did not have the strength, I was cashed out. so my 15 year old cousin snagged her car keys and threw the damn thing in her trunk (old pontiac with 5 speed) and drove me to a part of the creek (a gutter) by the road!

We caught thousands of crawdads out of there by dragging window screens through near the gutter. Threw them in fire and raked em out and ate them. I put that turtle in there and he never left. But the crawdad fishing suffered hehe. Still, I could go back and see him in that hole whenever I wanted to. Looking back it is amazing he even survived after I jacked his mouth up with those channel locks. I guess we put him where he had plenty of food and easy to catch.

Grandma got me a subscription to field and stream when I was very young and kept it until I joined the military. I think that was a big influence for me. I would read and re read and re read and re read everything in those magazines.

Grandma is 97 according to her birth certificate and older than that in real life. She is a tough old gal. Just a couple years ago she was still making dresses and clothes my hand and sending them to needy families in Africa. Now she can hardly paint a picture but come on shes 97. If I make it that far I hope I can still remember who I am and who my kids are.

I wish everyone had a tough old grandma like mine. I think the world would be a better place.

Sorry it's long. I've had some drinks tonight and thinking about my grandma. I visited her this weekend and she's still a tough old gal.

Cheers to grandma smile


-Bryan

Yep, formerly regularguy11B
Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667279 11/20/19 04:19 AM
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^^^^^^^^^Sounds like a helluva lady!^^^^^^^^^


Originally Posted By: Russ79
I learned long ago you can't reason someone out of something they don't reason themselves into.


Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667292 11/20/19 04:40 AM
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I started going to Colorado with my parents and both sets of grandparents the year I was born. After my dad passed, that slowly stopped, then my grandma started taking me hunting, mostly rabbits for the table. She was the best shot, my grandpa on my mothers side wasn't much into hunting. I had my own 22 and shotgun by the first grade, taught to shoot by my grandma, must have done alright, I qualified expert on all the ranges in basic training.


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Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667353 11/20/19 11:32 AM
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I was chased up a tree by a large hog. I then decided to take action. Even then I wouldn't have considered myself a hunter so much as an eradicator of hogs. I had no teacher other than you guys and YouTube. Once I found Steven Rinella I became more than just a shooter. I started shooting and trapping pigs and beaver for food, and then I added ducks and turkey. I really fell in love with the birds. I think successfully taking a turkey on my very first attempt may have spoiled me though. Added dove this year, and plan to get a bow and try deer next year. Thank you to everyone who helped me along the way.

Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667365 11/20/19 12:04 PM
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Growing up no one in my family hunted or had any interest in the outdoors except me until two of my older brothers did a little light hunting when they got in there early 20's.. I was the one that if you could not find me close to the house look for the woods and creeks.
I was very fortunate that my best friend father since 5th grade was the land manager for Ben Carpenter ranch's (Carpenter Freeway Irving) so I was able to Deer and Dove hunt at an early age.
We did not deer hunt very much and it was usually sit here against this tree and wait, dove hunting we did quite a bit.

Mr Chevy was a great man that enjoyed taking us out usually having a great time laughing at our goofiness while he drank beer and smoked his cigs up
Different times and scenarios to be honest I have no clue who is/was more passionate about the outdoors confused2

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Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667397 11/20/19 01:07 PM
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I feel I'm as good a hunter as those who taught me but only because I benefited from having quick access to the information and more that it took them years if not decades to learn on their own. Obviously, they didn't benefit from all the technology that we have available to us today.

As I have noted in these forums many times, my only concern is that much of what they learned and what I learned from them and through my own efforts carries little value to many hunters today.

Still, there is one thing they had that I and perhaps the vast majority lack today - Patience.


Dan,

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Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667430 11/20/19 01:41 PM
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Dad was my main driver in hunting. Hunted and fished with him and my older brother a lot. I also learned quite a bit from my brother by default being younger. I would say we all share a similar passion and drive for hunting, but different also. Dad always hunted but it was rifle hunting out of a stand. I have definitely had the urge to branch out and try new things, have hunted with traditional cap and ball muzzleloader, bow, pistol, iron sight lever guns, and started sitting trails random corned spots, tripods etc. I also want and am looking to do some public land hunting in the near future and I feel like the rest of my clan isn't as interested in it.

We kind of grew some stuff together also. Dad didn't tackle processing past field dressing and deboning himself and all we ever made out of deer was sausage, fresh or dry. Now we completely process at home cut steaks sausage, jerky, cured meets, summer sausage, hamburger etc. Been a great time, hope it never ends.


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Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667437 11/20/19 01:51 PM
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My father and Uncle were my mentors. We are surely a different type of hunter. They showed me how to hunt but back then it was more out of necessity
than any type of sport. They taught me the survival aspect and now I've been trying to teach my dad the sporting side of it, My uncle who was the bigger hunter of the 2 has passed on but not before showing me how to get every last spec of meat off of a animal. Me and Dad always talk about how much my uncle would have loved to hunt on my place now. We joke about how he would freak out if he saw a buck like what we have now compared to when he was hunting. My dad still gets excited and I have to get him to hold off on some shots but in the end he's glad he did. We don't have to hunt out of necessity anymore but I have the know how if I ever do. I'm a much more patient hunter these days than they ever were but they have a lot more animals under their belts.


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Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667465 11/20/19 02:08 PM
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I've talked about Dad on here plenty. His dad died when Dad was a teenager (~1934). Hunting was in the family, but I don't think kids went with "the men" as much as they do now. It wasn't until Dad met Mom and her dad hunted some that he got out and tried. There were leases off and on, Tarpley, Utopia, dove lease in Poth, and my grandfather bought 50 acres out Vance Jackson road before I was born. That's where I killed my first buck - quite a dink. Dad owned maybe 5 firearms total, no pistols. My much older brother really got into hunting and I looked up to him and Dad both, so I got pretty "ate up with it" too. Dad worked hard and a lot, plus, he had other hobbies, so, although he liked to hunt, it wasn't something he focused on all year. His older brother (my uncle Johnny) hunted, out of Austin, with the Patmeckys (sp?), an old Austin name, but he was a simple, but excellent carpenter and really didn't have much money at all. He only hunted with Dad a couple of times, but he was always a happy guy and really loved being outdoors. Another man that helped Dad restore an old homestead, Augustine Lopez, taught me a lot about cleaning, using simple means to attract deer, etc.

As stated above and before, men don't gather around the fire like they used to and I spend (maybe waste) a lot of time trying to recapture that.


...and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth. Gen. 1:28
Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667500 11/20/19 02:32 PM
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My mother...she was born on a ranch near midland not at a hospital....took me out of school to go on a mule deer hunt in New Mexico when I was in the first grade. We drove all the way back to Ft. Worth with that buck
laying across the fender of our 55 Chevrolet Bel Air. She got that buck mounted and I still have it up on my wall today. Annie Oakley would have lost big time in a shooting match with her.


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Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667544 11/20/19 03:14 PM
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Dad grew up with hunting as chore to feed the family. As he aged and prospered he never felt the drive. Consequently I’m self taught. He wanted me to own new cars because I could, I wanted the old classics because that’s what he had. I’m 47 now and he’s 74, he still shakes his head at my “antics”. He doesn’t understand why I do what I do but I damn sure understand him. He did what he had to do, I do what he did because I want to. I’m sure the shoe would be different on the other foot. His first car was a 40 Lincoln, mine was a 67 Mustang. Still wish I had my 65 Coupe Deville. You may think I’ve drifted off subject but I haven’t. My dad was my biggest drive, even though I didn’t have to, I wanted to be like him.

Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: Mr. T.] #7667577 11/20/19 03:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr. T.
My mother...she was born on a ranch near midland not at a hospital....took me out of school to go on a mule deer hunt in New Mexico when I was in the first grade. We drove all the way back to Ft. Worth with that buck
laying across the fender of our 55 Chevrolet Bel Air. She got that buck mounted and I still have it up on my wall today. Annie Oakley would have lost big time in a shooting match with her.


Wow. All the Dad stories are great, but that is even more special IMO.


Originally Posted By: Russ79
I learned long ago you can't reason someone out of something they don't reason themselves into.


Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: laid over] #7667588 11/20/19 03:40 PM
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Originally Posted by laid over
My grandma was probably the main one that I looked up to, and who fueled it for me. I was mostly just a fisherman growing up to be honest. We owned no land and grandma owned one firearm- a .38 revolver- for two legged vermin. I did kill a ton of birds with a pellet gun, and a handful of other small game. Between my grandma and my neighbors- probably moreso my neighbors- they gave me a nice hit list of birds that had to be gone and probably because they crapped on everything and there were a ton of them. Mostly english sparrows "dookie birds" and any grackle or crow or anything probably resembling one to be honest. We were pretty much surrounded by sunflowers in mesquite in the 80's, and the land was stepped. Tons of dookie birds, grackles, and crows.

My grandma was the best mentor a young boy could have possibly hoped for. We never went on a deer or elk or even a dove hunt but she was the primary influence in my life regards to the value of life and what needs to be killed.

Used to tell us (me and my cousins who she took care of all of us) stories about the farm, killing stray cats with a 12 gauge because they ate chickens, etc. Grandma was my hero.

She kicked a dudes [censored] that tried to carjack and rape her. And about clawed his eyes out. I will never forget it. Also also kicked my (then) stepdads [censored] when I was Probably 3 or 4 for beating me with a coathanger for no reason. And took me in and rescued me from a life that probably would have got me in prison to be honest.

Another funny story- grandma used to tell us stories about life on the farm, eating turtle soup etc. she apparently was fond of softshell turtles. Well, one time I went to pull a stringer of cats up and I could not retrieve it no matter how hard I pulled. I reached around in the undercut tried to untagle my stringer from the roots when the biggest snapper I have seen before or since stuck his head up out of the water with my stringer in his mouth. It was an alligator snapper and It was huge! I am 39 and to this day have never noodled for cats just because of this one incident.
I gave up and left, and on my way back my best bud's dad saw me. He was like where is your fish at Catfish? I told him about the turtle and he gave me his longest pair of channel locks and the biggest treble hook he had. Told me to bait it up with meat and go back, the turtle will take it. Grab him in the mouth with these channel locks and drag him home.

I went home and made a leader from 18 gauge wire my grandma made her electric fence from. I basically twisted that to my new treble hook and twisted a loop in the other end. Put some 25 pound shakespeare omniflex on my zebco 404. And put as much bacon ends and pieces on the treble hook as I could make fit and went back.

I caught that damn turtle. Tried to lift him up out of the water with my pole and it broke right at the metal joint! But that 25 pound line held. I grabbed him in the mouth with those channel locks and drug him out of the water and all the way home, through a good mile of woods and probably at least a half mile of roads and back alleys. For reference my secret catfish hole was near 635 in some woods and grandma lived on Bruton Road. Drug that snapper from 635 on the bank of that creek, past mcwhorter elementary, to grandmas house and I think I was probably in the 3rd or 4th grade. This time fram the sunflowers were all gone and they were putting up apartments and subdivisions. Anyways I was completely exhausted dragging that big turtle that far.

I thought she'd be pround but no sir- grandma pointed at the road and told me to drag that damn turle back to the creek where I found it! She didnt want nothing to do with it! I did not have the strength, I was cashed out. so my 15 year old cousin snagged her car keys and threw the damn thing in her trunk (old pontiac with 5 speed) and drove me to a part of the creek (a gutter) by the road!

We caught thousands of crawdads out of there by dragging window screens through near the gutter. Threw them in fire and raked em out and ate them. I put that turtle in there and he never left. But the crawdad fishing suffered hehe. Still, I could go back and see him in that hole whenever I wanted to. Looking back it is amazing he even survived after I jacked his mouth up with those channel locks. I guess we put him where he had plenty of food and easy to catch.

Grandma got me a subscription to field and stream when I was very young and kept it until I joined the military. I think that was a big influence for me. I would read and re read and re read and re read everything in those magazines.

Grandma is 97 according to her birth certificate and older than that in real life. She is a tough old gal. Just a couple years ago she was still making dresses and clothes my hand and sending them to needy families in Africa. Now she can hardly paint a picture but come on shes 97. If I make it that far I hope I can still remember who I am and who my kids are.

I wish everyone had a tough old grandma like mine. I think the world would be a better place.

Sorry it's long. I've had some drinks tonight and thinking about my grandma. I visited her this weekend and she's still a tough old gal.

Cheers to grandma smile



Love that turtle story. Thank you for sharing. Cheers to Grandma! cheers

Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667607 11/20/19 03:52 PM
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My dad was a big game guy with a passion for the mountains, My mom was big into upland, and was more of a crop defender on big game(shot, clean and ate deer but not necessarily hunt for them), her true passion is fishing(even today she still fishes 4 days a week)

Me, I’m a combo of both. I was turned loose at 5 on the ranch under my cousins supervision and my love has only grown. I have been blessed to be able to hunt multiple states each year for both. I live for the tidal flats of the coast all the way to the peak of Uncompahgre and more.


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Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667624 11/20/19 04:03 PM
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The turtles must have been a generational thing.

My grandpa was a trotliner ( didn’t hunt but fished 3-4 days a week when he was able ) and would always set a jug specifically for soft shell turtles

Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667668 11/20/19 04:48 PM
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My Dad never was a big hunter, but he loved to primitive camp, fish, and hike. He remained close friends with his buddy from HS. His buddy from HS was even more avid of an outdoorsman than my dad was, and is a very passionate hunter. When I was a kid I loved to fish, but I was eat up with hunting. We would go back to his little hometown in Oklahoma, and Mr Jones would take us hunting one day every Thanksgiving. It was always the highlight of my year. As he realized that I was eaten up with deer hunting, he bought me a Remington 788 in .243, and kinda took up hunting himself. He very unsuccessfully took me hunting on a friend's property in east Texas a few times as a kid, and we continued our yearly trek to Oklahoma. He never was, and still isn't what I would consider a passionate hunter, but he did it because that's what his boy loved, and he has showed his love for me my whole life by continuing that tradition.
When I moved to Florida in my late 20's, I was still a very novice hunter, but a very accomplished outdoorsman. I got a deer lease and befriended an old man by the name of Noel. I learned a lot about hunting and processing deer from that old man. Unfortunately, we have lost touch, and I suspect that he is no longer in this world, but he will always hold a fond place in my heart.
Even living in Florida I would make the yearly trek to Oklahoma to hunt with my Family. Through the years my Family and I have many fond memories of hunting and Fishing with Mr Jones, and have some beautiful deer to show, and some even better stories of failure to tell. I am back in Texas now, and to this day, Mr Jones still allows us to hunt as often as we have asked, and has been the main teacher and hunting mentor for me. Me, my sister, my Dad, brother-in-law, son, niece, and nephew are leaving Sunday for our annual trek to Oklahoma.
I have not seen Mr Jones actually hunt in years, but he hosts lots of friends on his expansive property, and pushes very hard to have the kids included. He even has a "kid's pond". Adults are not allowed to fish the "kids pond" unless they are fishing with a kid. Although I am pretty much allowed carte blanch, I am not allowed to bring a friend to the property to camp, hunt, or fish with one exception. If I ask permission, I can bring and Father and son or a Father and daughter for a family weekend. I can not imagine a person with more of a passion for the outdoors than someone who makes rules for his property that is specifically geared to spread the love of the outdoors to kids.
I have two main mentors. My Dad and Mr. Jones. I fall somewhere in the middle of the two.


Originally Posted by txhuntingguide
If I choose to hunt in a coon tail hat, a pink tootoo and hip waders that is my fine...
Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667677 11/20/19 04:55 PM
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No one taught me, I had to learn myself. I saved up for a Sheridan Silver Streak and learned how to sneak up on birds, squirrels and rabbits. My dad had no interest in hunting or fishing, was a golfer. Had no grandparents when I was born.

It's been a long enjoyable adventure.........cheers


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Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667721 11/20/19 05:33 PM
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Pretty much just as good of a shot as my dad at this point. I do outclass him with a handgun though. Evidently, I’m a better fisherman than he is, but he has more finesse, knowledge, and experience with all outdoors activities than I do or probably ever will.

Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667743 11/20/19 05:42 PM
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I relearned deer hunting and deer management from square one from Bill Maltsberger in my 40’s. I am a student still learning many years later. The more I learn, the more I realize there is yet to learn.

Re: How do you compare to the one that taught you? [Re: txtrophy85] #7667913 11/20/19 07:53 PM
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I was taught to shoot by my grandfather who did not hunt much and only killed one deer in his life during the depression. He taught me a lot of wildlife and farm/ranch lifestyle. I spent as much time with my grandparents as I could my early years. He would take us rabbit hunting when we were around 6 yrs old and taught us how to clean them so we could then cook them to eat. My Dad and my uncle both loved to hunt and fish, so I learned a lot about the outdoors from them. My Uncle was a good deer hunter who preferred hunting on foot vs blind/stand hunting. He killed some really nice bucks in the 40's and 50's using an old open sight 30-30 and only spot and stalk hunting. My Dad was more of a meat hunter and really loved to fish. My Mom loved to fish but did not care much for hunting. When I was young my Dad worked 6-7 days a week for a long time till an oilfield accident forced him into early retirement in the early 70's. After that he would take us along on his hunting or fishing trips if we were not in school. Later on when I was out of high school I was able to take him hunting and fishing a lot. Some of most memorable hunts were with him. As I got older and started hunting our two families were on leases together from the early 60's till the early 80's. Those were fun times when we all could hunt together. I then started to hunt on my own leases and was able to let wildlife teach me a lot about the outdoors. Sitting and observing wildlife as often as I could was as much fun as killing a deer. You can learn a lot by just sitting and watching any chance you get. Later on in life I moved back closer to my parents and took my Dad hunting a few times over the years. I spent a whole season in 2012 trying to get him a really good buck. We were finally successful in late Dec. 2012 taking the biggest deer he had ever killed. Not knowing at the time but that would be our last hunt together, it is a memory that will never be forgotten. I can't say if I am a better hunter or fisherman than any of them today. One thing I do know is that I am even more passionate today than I was back then when they were teaching me about the outdoor lifestyle they enjoyed. Those days are only memories now, but they still bring a smile every time I think back on one of those trips.


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