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Mar 25th, 2012
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Lessons learned through relationships with landowners #7632049 10/14/19 12:46 PM
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IMO, there isn't a more valuable topic that I can't remember seeing here than one that focuses directly on lessons learned after dealing with landowners. Thankfully, the vast majority of the relationships that I've had with landowners have been very positive. The only relationships that have been negative were with select members of landowners who were owners of heir land or land that included multiple owners of a single family. There's no question that most of the land in Texas that makes for good deer hunting is owned by private individuals, meaning that maintaining a good relationship with a landowner is paramount to keeping a lease for any length of time. Still, there are landowners that you probably want to steer away from when it comes to deer hunting. All in all, a good and lasting relationship with a landowner of the area you hunt is a very valuable thing no doubt.

Here are just a few of the lessons I've learned in no particular order, leaving aside the most obvious ones like treat the landowners property as you would your own (or better).

1. Landowners who run cows or other livestock usually greatly appreciate it if you do your practice shooting at the range rather than on their property.

2. Gates should always be left in the state you found them. If you find a gate that's been left open, the landowner probably has a good reason for leaving it that way.

3. Some landowners prefer to hear from you often while others prefer to only hear from you if you uncover a problem. Some people who live in the country prefer their solitude and don't need you calling them just to chat. Others might enjoy frequent, friendly conversation.

4. A landowner who gets along well with all his/her neighbors is a good find. One that doesn't is suspect.

5. It only takes a single screw up by you or any other lease members to leave a longstanding mark on a relationship with a landowner.

6. While this is more of a point towards hunters than landowners, a hunter who has been able to secure a lease for many years with a single landowner is probably someone you'll find enjoyable to be around, while someone who has to find a new place every season is probably very much the opposite.

No question there are probably a 100 or so more that some of you might wish to share.


Dan,

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Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Texas Dan] #7632078 10/14/19 01:06 PM
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Those are all pretty good.

Quote
Here are just a few of the lessons I've learned in no particular order, leaving aside the most obvious ones like treat the landowners property as you would your own (or better).


The problem with treating the property like you would your own is that a lot of people treat their properties like crap. They don't care about garbage, putting targets on trees to sight in a rifle, etc. My personal goal is for the landowner to not even know I have been there, save for maybe some tire tracks (not ruts!). I also pick up random trash I find on the landowner's property.

Quote
2. Gates should always be left in the state you found them. If you find a gate that's been left open, the landowner probably has a good reason for leaving it that way.


Yes, and I would add that if you find a gate open that you know to be normally closed, a call to the landowner to verify its status can be helpful. He may want it open or some other member may have left it open when they should not have done so. It it isn't supposed to be open, he will appreciate the call.

7. Report any problems with the property to the landowner. S/he will appreciate knowing about broken fences/gates, livestock that are out on the road, sick or dead livestock, fallen trees across access areas, etc.


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Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Double Naught Spy] #7632247 10/14/19 03:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Double Naught Spy
Those are all pretty good.

Quote
Here are just a few of the lessons I've learned in no particular order, leaving aside the most obvious ones like treat the landowners property as you would your own (or better).


The problem with treating the property like you would your own is that a lot of people treat their properties like crap. They don't care about garbage, putting targets on trees to sight in a rifle, etc. My personal goal is for the landowner to not even know I have been there, save for maybe some tire tracks (not ruts!). I also pick up random trash I find on the landowner's property.



Yep. We have a guy who hunts on us and the only way we know he was there is because he keeps the feeders filled and will text us before going out and leaving. He will have a place to hunt as long as we own that land.

Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Texas Dan] #7632386 10/14/19 06:30 PM
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These are all good. I don’t lease very much of my land, about 80 percent is open, because it’s impossible to find people with those values. We’re a working cattle ranch first and foremost, it’s how I eat and pay bills and send the kid to college and people jist don’t respect that. The ones that I don’t have leasing have all been with me for more than 15 years. I’m not opposed to leasing it’s just turning out to be too much of a hassle and no amount of money makes it worth it. It’s sad.

Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Texas Dan] #7632394 10/14/19 06:40 PM
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8. If you have an ask, do it when you hand him the annual payment. up

Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Texas Dan] #7632401 10/14/19 06:52 PM
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You never really know someone until you get in a lease with him. I have people ask me daily if I have an open spot and I tell them I'd rather an existing member get off the lease than add another and there is only 4 members on my place. Being raised on a farm I notice I have different values than the common city slicker, you have to be careful who you bring as they could potentially ruin your reputation or get you ran off.

Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Texas Dan] #7632490 10/14/19 08:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Texas Dan

1. Landowners who run cows or other livestock usually greatly appreciate it if you do your practice shooting at the range rather than on their property.


I have heard that cattle can actually get lead poisoning from ingesting bullets that make their way into hay or feed. No idea if true or not, but would kind of reinforce Texas Dan's thought on target shooting on lease.

Last edited by Dalroo; 10/14/19 08:45 PM.

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Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Texas Dan] #7632512 10/14/19 09:05 PM
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Bbcat78 has come hunting here the past few years. The cabin hunters stay in is not very far from the gate to enter the property. A neighbor also uses the gate to get to his. Last year the neighbor brought some people in to hunt his place. There were 3 vehicles. The last one through did not stop to close the gate. Bbcat78 saw this and went down and closed it and let me know what had happened and the description of the vehicle. I went to the neighbors and told him what had happened and he escorted the hunter off the property. Bbcat78 will always have a place to hunt if he wants it. A great guy.

Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Texas Dan] #7632530 10/14/19 09:24 PM
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Have lost two leases to to people that could pay way more, only to have them call and ask if would come back for original price. In short, don’t be a jerk because you pay a lot of money. It’s a privilege to hunt no matter what the pay.


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Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Texas Dan] #7632560 10/14/19 10:03 PM
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Been on our place for 12 years as lease boss. The OP's listed items are all totally accurate. My added 2 cents......

My LO told me when I signed the lease years ago "if you or somebody screws up then let me know and we will work through it. If you (or your hunters) screw up and try to hide it then you will be gone."

On the many leases I have been on over the years rarely have I seen a LO who invest some of the lease money back into improving the hunting on the property. Our LO does so on a regular basis and it is much appreciated.

Our LO has a BarBQ at their home at the start of each season for all the hunters and their families. They provide everything. Our hunters love and appreciate it. Our lease group gives the family a gift each year to thank them for allowing us to use their property.

Like everything else in life it boils down to mutual respect of another person and the property they are willing to share with us.


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Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Texas Dan] #7632609 10/14/19 11:01 PM
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I met this itch once who owned land. Threw her out anyway. But it was a lot harder than usual, lesson learned.

Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Texas Dan] #7632654 10/14/19 11:42 PM
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Lease agreements can change on a dime. We got the boot on a place we'd been on for years. Always respected the land and owner. At the end of the season he said he would not be renewing. Things and times change.

Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Texas Dan] #7632692 10/15/19 12:23 AM
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Leases are like good customers. Treat them right while you have them but don’t count on anything. Some day something will change and you’ll find another just as good or you'll just quit. Nothing is ever guaranteed.

Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: scalebuster] #7632699 10/15/19 12:29 AM
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Originally Posted by scalebuster
Leases are like good customers. Treat them right while you have them but don’t count on anything. Some day something will change and you’ll find another just as good or you'll just quit. Nothing is ever guaranteed.

Or someone will buy them out and have their own guys


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Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: tlk] #7632708 10/15/19 12:38 AM
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Originally Posted by tlk
Originally Posted by scalebuster
Leases are like good customers. Treat them right while you have them but don’t count on anything. Some day something will change and you’ll find another just as good or you'll just quit. Nothing is ever guaranteed.

Or someone will buy them out and have their own guys


I still remember when landowners considered hunters as customers and appreciated them coming out. Everyone I hunted with treated property like it should be. We had a few guys that came out opening weekend and thanksgiving from Houston to make the lease payment. We guided them around and tried not to let the landowner around them. Those days are long gone.

Re: Lessons learned through relationships with landowners [Re: Texas Dan] #7632800 10/15/19 01:55 AM
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Not sure if it has anything to do with it but employees and employers don't share the same level of love and loyalty they once did. The relationship being even after every paycheck has never been more valid than it is today. Employers will lay folks off at the first sign of lower revenue while employees consider themselves as always being available for another job.

Last edited by Texas Dan; 10/15/19 01:57 AM.

Dan,

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