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Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: txhunter1010] #6650272 01/27/17 12:50 AM
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Originally Posted By: txhunter1010
well yeah that still really didn't answer the question of if it is eaten would it harm humans? So should we test every deer we shoot? Im up in Coryell county so a long way away from the case they found but I still want to know


Colorado which is ground zero where CWD was finally named....has been observing it for 50 plus years.

Still has deer and elk and people aren't dropping like flies.

People are freaking out about a deer when it's been in CO for decades....what do they do about it...monitor nothing more nothing less.

Let's not forget CWD was first found in our Mule deer herd. We still have Mule deer, it was found in our FR elk herd that's been here since the 30's. We still have elk.


Donate to TX Youth hunting program.... better to donate then to waste it in taxes

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Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: txhunter1010] #6650762 01/27/17 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted By: txhunter1010
well yeah that still really didn't answer the question of if it is eaten would it harm humans? So should we test every deer we shoot? Im up in Coryell county so a long way away from the case they found but I still want to know


If it looks sick and is acting strange, shoot it and don't eat it. If in doubt, have it tested.

Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: Casper] #6650870 01/27/17 03:12 PM
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Thousands of deer/elk with CWD are consumed each year. Wyoming and Colorado have many thousands of deer and elk with CWD. Would I eat the brain of a deer? Nah. But the prions aren't in the meat. And there's no indication humans can contract the disease even if they did eat the brain.

They have tried very hard to infect axis deer with CWD. Gone so far as to implant prions straight into their brains and have never been successful.

If a deer species can't be forced to contract the disease I think primates are pretty safe.


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Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: 7mag] #6653003 01/29/17 03:25 PM
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Think positive!
Maybe those counties under the watch will come down on their lease prices.

Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: therancher] #6653136 01/29/17 05:33 PM
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Originally Posted By: therancher
Thousands of deer/elk with CWD are consumed each year. Wyoming and Colorado have many thousands of deer and elk with CWD. Would I eat the brain of a deer? Nah. But the prions aren't in the meat. And there's no indication humans can contract the disease even if they did eat the brain.

They have tried very hard to infect axis deer with CWD. Gone so far as to implant prions straight into their brains and have never been successful.

If a deer species can't be forced to contract the disease I think primates are pretty safe.



Prions in Skeletal Muscles of Deer with Chronic Wasting Disease

Rachel C. Angers1,*, Shawn R. Browning1,*,†, Tanya S. Seward2, Christina J. Sigurdson4,‡, Michael W. Miller5, Edward A. Hoover4, Glenn C. Telling1,2,3,§ snip...

Abstract The emergence of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer and elk in an increasingly wide geographic area, as well as the interspecies transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to humans in the form of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease, have raised concerns about the zoonotic potential of CWD. Because meat consumption is the most likely means of exposure, it is important to determine whether skeletal muscle of diseased cervids contains prion infectivity.

***Here bioassays in transgenic mice expressing cervid prion protein revealed the presence of infectious prions in skeletal muscles of CWD-infected deer, demonstrating that humans consuming or handling meat from CWD-infected deer are at risk to prion exposure.

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/311/5764/1117.long

Cervid to human prion transmission

Kong, Qingzhong

Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States

Abstract

Prion disease is transmissible and invariably fatal. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is the prion disease affecting deer, elk and moose, and it is a widespread and expanding epidemic affecting 22 US States and 2 Canadian provinces so far.

*** CWD poses the most serious zoonotic prion transmission risks in North America because of huge venison consumption (>6 million deer/elk hunted and consumed annually in the USA alone), significant prion infectivity in muscles and other tissues/fluids from CWD-affected cervids, and usually high levels of individual exposure to CWD resulting from consumption of the affected animal among often just family and friends. However, we still do not know whether CWD prions can infect humans in the brain or peripheral tissues or whether clinical/asymptomatic CWD zoonosis has already occurred, and we have no essays to reliably detect CWD infection in humans. We hypothesize that:

(1) The classic CWD prion strain can infect humans at low levels in the brain and peripheral lymphoid tissues;

(2) The cervid-to-human transmission barrier is dependent on the cervid prion strain and influenced by the host (human) prion protein (PrP) primary sequence;

(3) Reliable essays can be established to detect CWD infection in humans;and

(4) CWD transmission to humans has already occurred. We will test these hypotheses in 4 Aims using transgenic (Tg) mouse models and complementary in vitro approaches.

Aim 1 will prove that the classical CWD strain may infect humans in brain or peripheral lymphoid tissues at low levels by conducting systemic bioassays in a set of "humanized" Tg mouse lines expressing common human PrP variants using a number of CWD isolates at varying doses and routes. Experimental "human CWD" samples will also be generated for Aim 3.

Aim 2 will test the hypothesis that the cervid-to-human prion transmission barrier is dependent on prion strain and influenced by the host (human) PrP sequence by examining and comparing the transmission efficiency and phenotypes of several atypical/unusual CWD isolates/strains as well as a few prion strains from other species that have adapted to cervid PrP sequence, utilizing the same panel of humanized Tg mouse lines as in Aim 1.

Aim 3 will establish reliable essays for detection and surveillance of CWD infection in humans by examining in details the clinical, pathological, biochemical and in vitro seeding properties of existing and future experimental "human CWD" samples generated from Aims 1-2 and compare them with those of common sporadic human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) prions.

Aim 4 will attempt to detect clinical CWD-affected human cases by examining a significant number of brain samples from prion-affected human subjects in the USA and Canada who have consumed venison from CWD-endemic areas utilizing the criteria and essays established in Aim 3. The findings from this proposal will greatly advance our understandings on the potential and characteristics of cervid prion transmission in humans, establish reliable essays for CWD zoonosis and potentially discover the first case(s) of CWD infection in humans.

Public Health Relevance There are significant and increasing human exposure to cervid prions because chronic wasting disease (CWD, a widespread and highly infectious prion disease among deer and elk in North America) continues spreading and consumption of venison remains popular, but our understanding on cervid-to-human prion transmission is still very limited, raising public health concerns. This proposal aims to define the zoonotic risks of cervid prions and set up and apply essays to detect CWD zoonosis using mouse models and in vitro methods. The findings will greatly expand our knowledge on the potentials and characteristics of cervid prion transmission in humans, establish reliable essays for such infections and may discover the first case(s) of CWD infection in humans.

Funding Agency Agency National Institute of Health (NIH)

Institute National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

snip...

http://grantome.com/grant/NIH/R01-NS088604-01A1

Envt.07:

Pathological Prion Protein (PrPTSE) in Skeletal Muscles of Farmed and Free Ranging White-Tailed Deer Infected with Chronic Wasting Disease

***The presence and seeding activity of PrPTSE in skeletal muscle from CWD-infected cervids suggests prevention of such tissue in the human diet as a precautionary measure for food safety, pending on further clarification of whether CWD may be transmissible to humans.

http://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/prion/Prion5-Supp-PrionEnvironment.pdf?nocache=1333529975

***In contrast, cattle are highly susceptible to white-tailed deer CWD and mule deer CWD in experimental conditions but no natural CWD infections in cattle have been reported (Sigurdson, 2008; Hamir et al., 2006). It is not known how susceptible humans are to CWD but given that the prion can be present in muscle, it is likely that humans have been exposed to the agent via consumption of venison (Sigurdson, 2008). Initial experimental research, however, suggests that human susceptibility to CWD is low and there may be a robust species barrier for CWD transmission to humans (Sigurdson, 2008). It is apparent, though, that CWD is affecting wild and farmed cervid populations in endemic areas with some deer populations decreasing as a result.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/sy...ing-disease.pdf

Technical Abstract:

***Cattle could be exposed to the agent of chronic wasting disease (CWD) through contact with infected farmed or free-ranging cervids or exposure to contaminated premises. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential for CWD derived from elk to transmit to cattle after intracranial inoculation. Calves (n=14) were inoculated with brain homogenate derived from elk with CWD to determine the potential for transmission and define the clinicopathologic features of disease.

Cattle were necropsied if clinical signs occurred or at the termination of experiment (49 months post-inoculation (MPI)).

Clinical signs of poor appetite, weight loss, circling, and bruxism occurred in two cattle (14%) at 16 and 17 MPI, respectively.

Accumulation of abnormal prion protein (PrP**Sc) in these cattle was confined to the central nervous system with the most prominent immunoreactivity in midbrain, brainstem, and hippocampus with lesser immunoreactivity in the cervical spinal cord.

*** The rate of transmission was lower than in cattle inoculated with CWD derived from mule deer (38%) or white-tailed deer (86%).

Additional studies are required to fully assess the potential for cattle to develop CWD through a more natural route of exposure, but a low rate of transmission after intracranial inoculation suggests that risk of transmission through other routes is low.

***A critical finding here is that if CWD did transmit to exposed cattle, currently used diagnostic techniques would detect and differentiate it from other prion diseases in cattle based on absence of spongiform change, distinct pattern of PrP**Sc deposition, and unique molecular profile.

http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?SEQ_NO_115=277212

Monday, April 04, 2016

*** Limited amplification of chronic wasting disease prions in the peripheral tissues of intracerebrally inoculated cattle ***

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2016/04/limited-amplification-of-chronic.html

Monday, May 02, 2016

*** Zoonotic Potential of CWD Prions: An Update Prion 2016 Tokyo ***

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2016/05/zoonotic-potential-of-cwd-prions-update.html

Exotic Meats USA Announces Urgent Statewide Recall of Elk Tenderloin Because It May Contain Meat Derived From An Elk Confirmed To Have Chronic Wasting Disease

Contact: Exotic Meats USA 1-800-680-4375

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE -- February 9, 2009 -- Exotic Meats USA of San Antonio, TX is initiating a voluntary recall of Elk Tenderloin because it may contain meat derived from an elk confirmed to have Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). The meat with production dates of December 29, 30 and 31, 2008 was purchased from Sierra Meat Company in Reno, NV. The infected elk came from Elk Farm LLC in Pine Island, MN and was among animals slaughtered and processed at USDA facility Noah’s Ark Processors LLC.

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a fatal brain and nervous system disease found in elk and deer. The disease is caused by an abnormally shaped protein called a prion, which can damage the brain and nerves of animals in the deer family. Currently, it is believed that the prion responsible for causing CWD in deer and elk is not capable of infecting humans who eat deer or elk contaminated with the prion, but the observation of animal-to-human transmission of other prion-mediated diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), has raised a theoretical concern regarding the transmission of CWD from deer or elk to humans. At the present time, FDA believes the risk of becoming ill from eating CWD-positive elk or deer meat is remote. However, FDA strongly advises consumers to return the product to the place of purchase, rather than disposing of it themselves, due to environmental concerns.

Exotic Meats USA purchased 1 case of Elk Tenderloins weighing 16.9 lbs. The Elk Tenderloin was sold from January 16 – 27, 2009. The Elk Tenderloins was packaged in individual vacuum packs weighing approximately 3 pounds each. A total of six packs of the Elk Tenderloins were sold to the public at the Exotic Meats USA retail store. Consumers who still have the Elk Tenderloins should return the product to Exotic Meats USA at 1003 NE Loop 410, San Antonio, TX 78209. Customers with concerns or questions about the Voluntary Elk Recall can call 1-800-680-4375. The safety of our customer has always been and always will be our number one priority.

Exotic Meats USA requests that for those customers who have products with the production dates in question, do not consume or sell them and return them to the point of purchase. Customers should return the product to the vendor. The vendor should return it to the distributor and the distributor should work with the state to decide upon how best to dispose. If the consumer is disposing of the product he/she should consult with the local state EPA office.

http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ArchiveRecalls/2009/ucm128543.htm

LOOKING FOR CWD IN HUMANS AS nvCJD or as an ATYPICAL CJD, LOOKING IN ALL THE WRONG PLACES $$$

*** These results would seem to suggest that CWD does indeed have zoonotic potential, at least as judged by the compatibility of CWD prions and their human PrPC target. Furthermore, extrapolation from this simple in vitro assay suggests that if zoonotic CWD occurred, it would most likely effect those of the PRNP codon 129-MM genotype and that the PrPres type would be similar to that found in the most common subtype of sCJD (MM1).***

https://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/prion/article/28124/?nocache=112223249

*** We recently observed the direct transmission of a natural classical scrapie isolate to macaque after a 10-year silent incubation period,

***with features similar to some reported for human cases of sporadic CJD, albeit requiring fourfold long incubation than BSE. Scrapie, as recently evoked in humanized mice (Cassard, 2014),

***is the third potentially zoonotic PD (with BSE and L-type BSE),

***thus questioning the origin of human sporadic cases. We will present an updated panorama of our different transmission studies and discuss the implications of such extended incubation periods on risk assessment of animal PD for human health.


***thus questioning the origin of human sporadic cases***


***our findings suggest that possible transmission risk of H-type BSE to sheep and human. Bioassay will be required to determine whether the PMCA products are infectious to these animals.


https://prion2015.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/prion2015abstracts.pdf

*** In complement to the recent demonstration that humanized mice are susceptible to scrapie, we report here the first observation of direct transmission of a natural classical scrapie isolate to a macaque after a 10-year incubation period. Neuropathologic examination revealed all of the features of a prion disease: spongiform change, neuronal loss, and accumulation of PrPres throughout the CNS.

*** This observation strengthens the questioning of the harmlessness of scrapie to humans, at a time when protective measures for human and animal health are being dismantled and reduced as c-BSE is considered controlled and being eradicated.

*** Our results underscore the importance of precautionary and protective measures and the necessity for long-term experimental transmission studies to assess the zoonotic potential of other animal prion strains.

http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?SEQ_NO_115=313160

why do we not want to do TSE transmission studies on chimpanzees $

5. A positive result from a chimpanzee challenged severly would likely create alarm in some circles even if the result could not be interpreted for man. I have a view that all these agents could be transmitted provided a large enough dose by appropriate routes was given and the animals kept long enough. Until the mechanisms of the species barrier are more clearly understood it might be best to retain that hypothesis.

snip...

R. BRADLEY

http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20080102222950/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1990/09/23001001.pdf

Transmission Studies

Mule deer transmissions of CWD were by intracerebral inoculation and compared with natural cases {the following was written but with a single line marked through it ''first passage (by this route)}...TSS

resulted in a more rapidly progressive clinical disease with repeated episodes of synocopy ending in coma. One control animal became affected, it is believed through contamination of inoculum (?saline). Further CWD transmissions were carried out by Dick Marsh into ferret, mink and squirrel monkey. Transmission occurred in ALL of these species with the shortest incubation period in the ferret.

snip...

http://web.archive.org/web/20060307063531/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m11b/tab01.pdf

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/Comments/03-025IFA/03-025IFA-2.pdf

Spongiform Encephalopathy in Captive Wild ZOO BSE INQUIRY

http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20090505194948/http://bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m09a/tab03.pdf

”The occurrence of CWD must be viewed against the contest of the locations in which it occurred. It was an incidental and unwelcome complication of the respective wildlife research programmes. Despite it’s subsequent recognition as a new disease of cervids, therefore justifying direct investigation, no specific research funding was forthcoming. The USDA veiwed it as a wildlife problem and consequently not their province!” page 26.

http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20080102193705/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m11b/tab01.pdf

We inoculated cynomolgus macaques with serial dilutions of BSE-infected material. High dose-inoculated animals developed typical clinical disease with all the pathognomonic hallmarks, and incubation periods ranging from 3–8 years. Among low-dosed animals, some developed clinical signs with atypical patterns after extensive incubation periods, exhibiting lesion and biochemical profiles that differed sharply from the typical disease picture. Despite the presence of neurological signs and neuronal lesions, classical lesions of spongiosis and presence of cerebral PrPres were inconstant, or even absent. These observations suggest that low-dose exposure, which would have been the most frequent occurrence during the period of risk, could induce a non-typical pathology that may not be recognized as "prion disease."

link url not available, please see PRION 2011 ;

http://www.prion2011.ca/files/PRION_2011_-_Posters_(May_5-11).pdf

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD AND SCRAPIE TSE PRION ZOONOSIS UPDATE

*** WDA 2016 NEW YORK ***

We found that CWD adapts to a new host more readily than BSE and that human PrP was unexpectedly prone to misfolding by CWD prions. In addition, we investigated the role of specific regions of the bovine, deer and human PrP protein in resistance to conversion by prions from another species. We have concluded that the human protein has a region that confers unusual susceptibility to conversion by CWD prions.

Student Presentations Session 2

The species barriers and public health threat of CWD and BSE prions

Ms. Kristen Davenport1, Dr. Davin Henderson1, Dr. Candace Mathiason1, Dr. Edward Hoover1 1Colorado State University

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is spreading rapidly through cervid populations in the USA. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, mad cow disease) arose in the 1980s because cattle were fed recycled animal protein. These and other prion diseases are caused by abnormal folding of the normal prion protein (PrP) into a disease causing form (PrPd), which is pathogenic to nervous system cells and can cause subsequent PrP to misfold. CWD spreads among cervids very efficiently, but it has not yet infected humans. On the other hand, BSE was spread only when cattle consumed infected bovine or ovine tissue, but did infect humans and other species. The objective of this research is to understand the role of PrP structure in cross-species infection by CWD and BSE. To study the propensity of each species’ PrP to be induced to misfold by the presence of PrPd from verious species, we have used an in vitro system that permits detection of PrPd in real-time. We measured the conversion efficiency of various combinations of PrPd seeds and PrP substrate combinations. We observed the cross-species behavior of CWD and BSE, in addition to feline-adapted CWD and BSE. We found that CWD adapts to a new host more readily than BSE and that human PrP was unexpectedly prone to misfolding by CWD prions. In addition, we investigated the role of specific regions of the bovine, deer and human PrP protein in resistance to conversion by prions from another species. We have concluded that the human protein has a region that confers unusual susceptibility to conversion by CWD prions. CWD is unique among prion diseases in its rapid spread in natural populations. BSE prions are essentially unaltered upon passage to a new species, while CWD adapts to the new species. This adaptation has consequences for surveillance of humans exposed to CWD.

Wildlife Disease Risk Communication Research Contributes to Wildlife Trust Administration Exploring perceptions about chronic wasting disease risks among wildlife and agriculture professionals and stakeholders

http://www.wda2016.org/uploads/5/8/6/1/58613359/wda_2016_conference_proceedings_low_res.pdf

Axis Deer and CWD ?

Many of the regulations or proposed regulations cover only species known to be susceptible to CWD; however, it is not known whether some farmed exotic cervid species in North America, such as fallow deer (Dama dama), sika deer (Cervus nippon), or axis deer (Axis axis), are susceptible to CWD.

https://cshmonographs.org/index.php/monographs/article/viewFile/4032/3249

https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=228787

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/06/natural-cases-of-cwd-in-eight-sika-deer.html

kind regards, terry

Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: 7mag] #6653167 01/29/17 05:59 PM
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So, who read all of that?

Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: 7mag] #6653432 01/29/17 10:13 PM
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I need cliff notes.
Who let flounder in here?


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Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: Sneaky] #6653583 01/30/17 12:24 AM
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Originally Posted By: Sneaky
So, who read all of that?


I scanned it. Nothing new or noteworthy.


Crotchety old bastidge
Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: therancher] #6653631 01/30/17 01:01 AM
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Originally Posted By: therancher
Originally Posted By: Sneaky
So, who read all of that?


I scanned it. Nothing new or noteworthy.


Good enough. Thanks.

Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: 7mag] #6653690 01/30/17 01:55 AM
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Same stuff he posts every time... sky is falling...

Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: 7mag] #6653887 01/30/17 04:46 AM
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IMO, Much ado about VERY LITTLE.... confused2


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Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: 7mag] #6653927 01/30/17 06:03 AM
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I heard this recently on the radio that it (CWD) only survives between the antlers on bucks, mature are not. Basically when the antlers get pass the ears the extended sunlight (Radiation B16) infussed to the surface of the exposed skull becomes prevalant enough to decimate the disease. The TPWD at this time does not want to admit it but AR's have and will contribute to the demise of the specie unless steps are taken to eliminate bucks roughly 13" or under


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Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: 7mag] #6653972 01/30/17 12:44 PM
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I'm SO disappointed in TWA (Texas Wildlife [censored]) now. Haven't heard a statement from them. All they did was blame a group of Deer Breeders before this. Anxious to see their stance now and how they spin it. I feel like Hilary Clinton is in charge of this group and I wasted my money to be a member! I'm OUT!

Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: 10pointers] #6654103 01/30/17 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted By: 10pointers
I heard this recently on the radio that it (CWD) only survives between the antlers on bucks, mature are not. Basically when the antlers get pass the ears the extended sunlight (Radiation B16) infussed to the surface of the exposed skull becomes prevalant enough to decimate the disease. The TPWD at this time does not want to admit it but AR's have and will contribute to the demise of the specie unless steps are taken to eliminate bucks roughly 13" or under


Heh heh..


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Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: Bowman24] #6654106 01/30/17 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted By: Bowman24
I'm SO disappointed in TWA (Texas Wildlife [censored]) now. Haven't heard a statement from them. All they did was blame a group of Deer Breeders before this. Anxious to see their stance now and how they spin it. I feel like Hilary Clinton is in charge of this group and I wasted my money to be a member! I'm OUT!


I'd sue the state for destroying my elk after "their" deer infected them if I was Patterson.


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Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: 7mag] #6654777 01/30/17 10:45 PM
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up

Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: tlk] #6654836 01/30/17 11:29 PM
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Originally Posted By: tlk
who the heck shoots a one and a half year old buck is my first question


It's called a spike. You've never shot a spike?



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Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: ChadTRG42] #6654843 01/30/17 11:33 PM
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Originally Posted By: ChadTRG42
Originally Posted By: tlk
who the heck shoots a one and a half year old buck is my first question


It's called a spike. You've never shot a spike?
That is about all I shoot. Either WT or Axis. I was wondering what my brain problem was.

Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: 7mag] #6656071 01/31/17 08:01 PM
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txtrophy85 Offline
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they have found several cases of CWD in west texas mule deer....people still hunt deer in the trans-pecos


Imo they are blowing this thing way out of proportion.

its a naturally occurring disease. EHD and blue tongue are way worse


we never tested for it prior so that's why its never been found in whitetail. hell, breeders have been required to test for it and it took almost 30 years to find it in a breeder pen.


its all scare tactics and hype that they promoted to give the deer breeding industry a black eye and now look what happened


For it is not the quarry that we truly seek, but the adventure.
Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: 7mag] #6656268 01/31/17 10:57 PM
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JMalin Offline
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How far was this deer from the breeder ranch where CWD was first detected in captive Texas herd?

Last edited by JMalin; 01/31/17 10:58 PM.
Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: JMalin] #6656474 02/01/17 01:33 AM
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flounder Offline
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Originally Posted By: JMalin
How far was this deer from the breeder ranch where CWD was first detected in captive Texas herd?


i cannot answer that, but this might give you some idea by county...and then you can get another map and compare where they are located and how far apart. ...

TPWD CWD TRACKING


kind regards, terry

Re: 1st Confirmed case of CWD in Free Range Texas deer [Re: 7mag] #6658883 02/02/17 07:25 PM
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gary roberson Offline
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From what I understand, the distance between this case and the first detected captive herd was approximately four miles.
Adios,
gary

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