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Mar 25th, 2012
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Scrapple Time #5525146 01/07/15 02:24 PM
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Today, if you offer someone a little hunk of meat pudding you are more likely to be given a restraining order than a “thank you.” However, this meat pudding from Pennsylvania and the mid-Atlantic states should be made by homesteaders at least once in their lives. It’s mostly a breakfast dish–think maltomeal pancake with a crispy outside and creamy inside with bits of meat–and makes an excellent vessel for your favorite jam, preserves, or syrup.

I’m fond of old recipes and this meat pudding is a close relative to the Irish white and black puddings, the Scottish Haggis, and German panhas. It is definitely a working man’s recipe intended to make the best use of the entire animal and packing a days worth of calories into a meal. I eat it like I would French toast or pancakes.

Traditionally it’s made with pig, but I decided to take the trimmings from the doe I killed with my buddy Clayton and give scrapple a go. Don’t hold yourself to the exact amounts of cornmeal and flour I listed, because you are cooking it to texture. I ended up using all of what I listed, but the amount of stock you finish with will vary from mine thus making the dry ingredients differ as well.

Ingredients

10 pounds of deer trimmings and bones
1 deer heart
1 deer liver
1 deer head
2 cups chopped celery
2 cups chopped onion
2 cups chopped carrot
6 bay leaves
I cup of fresh rosemary
10 pounds of cornmeal
2 pounds of Buckwheat Flour (Can substitute Oat Flour or Quinoa Flour)
1/2 cup of grated nutmeg
1/4 cup of ground allspice
1/4 cup of coarse black pepper
2 TBS ground cardamom
Salt
Method

Save the trimmings, offal, bones and head from your deer. Sadly, my heart shot placement left me with only the liver to use.

Combine the well salted meat, bones, and offal with the vegetables, rosemary, and bay leaves. Cover with water and bring to a simmer for at least 4 hours.

With a slotted spoon and tongs, remove the bones, meat, and veggies and allow to cool. Discard the bones and veggies. Strain and save the stock.



Chop your meat to no larger than a quarter. Skin the tongue, remove any gristle. Mix the rest of the spices with the chopped meat and return to the stock. Bring to a gentle boil.



Slowly mix in corn meal, stirring constantly. Stop adding cornmeal when consistency approaches “soupy maltomeal.” Now begin to add buckwheat flour, careful not to allow clumps to form. Your arm should now begin to hurt from stirring so much and for so long. Do your best not to allow the scrapple to stick to the bottom of the pot.

When your stirring instrument, I used an over sized BBQ spatula, can stand up on its own, it is ready to be poured into a wax paper lined square loaf container. I ended up using every single container I owned, regardless of shape. Next time, I’ll buy some of those cheap aluminum rectangle containers from the store.



When ready to serve, slice off a piece, dust in flour and fry till crisp in some bacon fat. Drizzle some maple syrup, slice off a piece of home made ham , fry an egg and dig in!

In Texas, we don't make scrapple, so I'm definitely a newby. Have you eaten or made scrapple? What do you think?

More pictures over at my blog, if anyone is interested. http://wp.me/p3bCKM-w9

Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5527826 01/08/15 05:27 PM
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very cool

Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5531659 01/10/15 03:39 AM
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My wife is from up north and her dad introduced me to scrapple. I love it. The recipe I use is not as complex, your's looks awesome! I also like the fact you are using parts that are normally tossed out.

Very cool! Thanks for sharing!


"One cannot be a mediocre squirrel hunter, and at the same time a skillful deer hunter. The two techniques go together." Francis E. Sell
Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5531959 01/10/15 07:03 AM
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I dunno scrapple but I plaid the game once and et was fun. flag

On a serious note, I appreciate your posts and your desire to use all of the animal. No, I have never had scrapple but have seen the yankees on TV eat it. I would try it.

Re: Scrapple Time [Re: skinnerback] #5532007 01/10/15 11:59 AM
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When we were visiting our oldest daughter and her husband in Baltimore last spring, we had breakfast one morning at a popular local diner.

I tried scrapple....tried to eat it. No go. Poured maple syrup over it. No go. So I begged some bacon off my wife's plate. I had much better success with eating pasties from Michigan's Upper Peninsula than scrapple in Maryland.

Our southern breakfasts are just fine with bacon, sausage, and country ham. We don't need scrapple.


"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple.....and wrong." H. L. Mencken
Re: Scrapple Time [Re: Palehorse] #5532048 01/10/15 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted By: Palehorse
My wife is from up north and her dad introduced me to scrapple. I love it. The recipe I use is not as complex, your's looks awesome! I also like the fact you are using parts that are normally tossed out.

Very cool! Thanks for sharing!


Palehorse, my scrapple recipe is probably a little more complicated than traditional scrapple, but I basically combined three or four different recipes. The overwhelming majority only used salt and black pepper as spices.

Probably, simplifying the spices makes it easier to eat in a variety of ways. For instance, lots of folks eat it like its a piece of meat...with hot things like jalepenos or cayenne pepper. Dipping it in runny egg yolk, etc.

I'd planned on eating like a "deer pancake/pudding" and it tastes like it.

Re: Scrapple Time [Re: dawaba] #5532052 01/10/15 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted By: dawaba


Our southern breakfasts are just fine with bacon, sausage, and country ham. We don't need scrapple.


So in Baltimore, was it offered like a meat choice? What was the consistency of the scrapple you had? Was it mostly meat, or was it mostly cornmeal/flour? Did it look like the picture above? I've wondered because in the recipes I saw, it seemed mostly like a maltomeal/grits with meat in it.

But in reading some peoples accounts of it, like yours, it sounds like it was mostly meat.

Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5532174 01/10/15 02:25 PM
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My Mother used to make it. She was German and called it pannace. The spelling is wrong but that was the way it sounded. Fried it in the mornings and it was very good.

Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5532221 01/10/15 02:47 PM
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We don't use the organs, it tends to keep some people from eating it. We just boil up the rib cages, necks, etc, that are tough to remove the meat from.
The German family that we do this with pronounce it "pon-us." An Americanize version of "panhas" previously mentioned.
Our scrapple is usually made after a sausage making party where we typically do 1000-1200 pounds of sausage. By then everyone has drank more than their share and the recipe usually is thrown out the window.
Truthfully there is no recipe, just "that's what Opa would have added."

For us it is just the basics;
Boiled meat scraps, ground up
Flour
Corn meal
Salt
Pepper
Garlic
And whatever Darrell drops in when no one is looking.

There is no exact quantities of the above ingredients, it comes out different each year. They just keep adding more until a few of them can agree that it looks and taste about right. Getting a few drunk square heads to agree is the hardest part.

Andrew, I like the adding veggies to the mix, I bet it brings on a whole different flavor. But I don't dare mention this to the Germans, they would never invite me back. They are serious about this stuff.


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Re: Scrapple Time [Re: don k] #5532329 01/10/15 03:40 PM
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Originally Posted By: don k
My Mother used to make it. She was German and called it pannace. The spelling is wrong but that was the way it sounded. Fried it in the mornings and it was very good.


Yup..This is what this Polock is used too. I've always had liked it a little more on the cornmeal side. Its good fried up in an iron skillet. The edges get a little crispy. Pour some syrup on it. YUM.

Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5532680 01/10/15 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted By: AndrewOSpencer
Originally Posted By: dawaba


Our southern breakfasts are just fine with bacon, sausage, and country ham. We don't need scrapple.


So in Baltimore, was it offered like a meat choice? What was the consistency of the scrapple you had? Was it mostly meat, or was it mostly cornmeal/flour? Did it look like the picture above? I've wondered because in the recipes I saw, it seemed mostly like a maltomeal/grits with meat in it.

But in reading some peoples accounts of it, like yours, it sounds like it was mostly meat.


In Baltimore (actually Joppa, just NE of Baltimore), the scrapple was a side order just like bacon or sausage. It was cooked as a meat patty, with only enough cornmeal/binder to hold everything together. The outer edges of the patty were crispy and the inside was softer and juicier. On the main it was organ meat from pork and beef.

I'm not too fond of most organ meat, and in South Africa I ate quite a lot of pap (or pop), which is a organ slurry with mushrooms and even onions that is ladled over a plate of grits. It's apparently very popular in RSA, like scrapple is in the mid-Atlantic. I didn't really care for it, but my PH ate it with gusto every morning, usually with a big dollop of peach chutney on top. What I loved for breakfast in Africa was "macon", which was beef processed and prepared and fried exactly like bacon. The meat for macon apparently comes from the same part of the beef carcass as bacon from the hog carcass. I haven't been able to find any macon around here; I think it would be very popular.

But I'm pretty sure scrapple won't find many takers here in East Texas because kidney, tongue, heart, and tripe aren't very popular either.


"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple.....and wrong." H. L. Mencken
Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5532733 01/10/15 06:56 PM
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We use a big kettle to make our scrapple in, we make a lot. Stirring the concoction was done with an oar until by brother brought a big drill with a big paint mixing beater, much better.

Then cook it up like Andrew said, sprinkled in flour, until it eats like a bug, crispy on the outside and gooey in the middle.

up


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Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5532914 01/10/15 08:43 PM
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Originally Posted By: AndrewOSpencer
Originally Posted By: Palehorse
My wife is from up north and her dad introduced me to scrapple. I love it. The recipe I use is not as complex, your's looks awesome! I also like the fact you are using parts that are normally tossed out.

Very cool! Thanks for sharing!


Palehorse, my scrapple recipe is probably a little more complicated than traditional scrapple, but I basically combined three or four different recipes. The overwhelming majority only used salt and black pepper as spices.

Probably, simplifying the spices makes it easier to eat in a variety of ways. For instance, lots of folks eat it like its a piece of meat...with hot things like jalepenos or cayenne pepper. Dipping it in runny egg yolk, etc.

I'd planned on eating like a "deer pancake/pudding" and it tastes like it.


My family makes it in a smaller batch. I just use the heart and liver from the deer or hog one of us has just killed. Here's the recipe.

1 deer heart finely chopped
1 deer liver finely chopped
1/4 cup of bacon fat
1 onion finely chopped
1 cup of cornmeal (I like coarse ground)
1/2 cup of flour
4 cups of beef broth
2 teaspoons of Tony Chachere's

Boil the beef broth and Tony's. Add the cornmeal constantly stirring. Lower the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. While it's simmering, brown the heart and liver with the onion in the bacon fat. Mix it all into the cornmeal mush. Put it in a shallow baking pan and chill in the fridge. When your ready to eat, cut it into slices, roll in flour, and brown on all sides with a little more bacon fat.

It's pretty good!


"One cannot be a mediocre squirrel hunter, and at the same time a skillful deer hunter. The two techniques go together." Francis E. Sell
Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5533010 01/10/15 09:35 PM
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Well now this thread's got me wanting to try scrapple.

Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5533169 01/10/15 11:08 PM
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I forgot to note that we throw a few chunks of pork butt (or picnics) in the pot while boiling the deer bones. It seems to help make a binder and the scrapple stays together better. Anyone else do this?


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Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5537770 01/12/15 07:18 PM
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I'm sure it's great but I think I would have to be REALLY hungry before I would knowingly try it.


Yat Yas
Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5545257 01/15/15 10:17 PM
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My wife is originally from Silver Spring, MD, and her father grew up on the Eastern Shore, where scrapple is a breakfast staple. I can eat it, but it's a bit of an acquired taste in my opinion. Making it out of venison is brilliant, though, a great use of the less desirable cuts (and offal) on the animal. My father, who taught me to only shoot animals were were going to eat, would greatly admire your creativity here...well done!


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Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5545304 01/15/15 10:36 PM
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We call it panas, same thing though.


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Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5545525 01/15/15 11:59 PM
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Exiled I like to think I use as much as possible of the game. Scrapple, or deer pancakes as my boys now call it, is a pretty cool way to have venison in the morning.

Redchevy, the history of scrapple is pretty cool. I think somewhere I read it being called panas, panhas, and similar type names from German immigrants. All basically a meat pudding made with cornmeal and a little flour.

Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5545557 01/16/15 12:20 AM
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I take it into work and share it with the guys. They call it German Spam.


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Re: Scrapple Time [Re: Simple Searcher] #5545562 01/16/15 12:22 AM
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Originally Posted By: Simple Searcher
I take it into work and share it with the guys. They call it German Spam.


I lol'ed

Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5546401 01/16/15 02:07 PM
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Originally Posted By: AndrewOSpencer
Exiled I like to think I use as much as possible of the game. Scrapple, or deer pancakes as my boys now call it, is a pretty cool way to have venison in the morning.

Redchevy, the history of scrapple is pretty cool. I think somewhere I read it being called panas, panhas, and similar type names from German immigrants. All basically a meat pudding made with cornmeal and a little flour.


Yup my head has corners, I believe panas(sp) is the german name.


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Re: Scrapple Time [Re: AndrewOSpencer] #5546517 01/16/15 03:00 PM
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"1 cup of rosemary" seems far too much.....and overwhelming

Re: Scrapple Time [Re: conifer] #5546527 01/16/15 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted By: conifer
"1 cup of rosemary" seems far too much.....and overwhelming


Not for simmering the skull. It was just right. If you sprinkled that much in the actual cornmeal, then yes. Too much.

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