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Max Online: 16728 @ 03/25/12 08:51 AM
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#7238108 - 07/28/18 09:51 AM Quail Dog
Dave Scott Offline
Tracker

Registered: 10/16/13
Posts: 513
Have any of you owned a variety of pointing dogs, pointer, setter, German short hair? How do they compare on easy of handling? Ability?

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#7238158 - 07/28/18 11:31 AM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
bill oxner Online   content
THF Celebrity

Registered: 11/03/09
Posts: 48971
Loc: Katy-Fulshear
All the pointing breeds are bred to run to the front. Some do it better than others within the breed. Front running matters more to me than boot licking.
_________________________
Quail hunting is like walking into, and out of a beautiful painting all day long. Gene Hill








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#7238964 - 07/29/18 01:09 PM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
scalebuster Online   content
Veteran Tracker

Registered: 11/25/10
Posts: 3427
All dogs are going to be different. Look at the parents for qualities you want. If thatís not possible look at dogs bred from a kennel and talk to several breeders about the qualities you want in a dog. Find someone your comfortable with that has a good reputation. Pick a litter and let the breeder pick the pup he thinks will suit you best. I think dogs are better bred now than they ever have been and you should be able to get what you want if you look hard enough. Iím a Brittany fan but own and have and hunted with most breeds. Most well bred dogs will hunt but some will be better than others.

Itís like human atheletes. Some will make good little league players, some will play high school, some college, and a few great ones will be major leaguers. A high school baseball player is still a pretty good player. The most important thing for bird dogs is birds and more birds with proper obedience breakinng.

Buy this book. Itís been on my shelf since the Ď90ís. Half of it explains most pointing breeds and the other half will teach you how to train a bird dog:

https://m.barnesandnoble.com/p/point-jam...ASABEgJOUPD_BwE

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#7239174 - 07/29/18 05:47 PM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
blanked Offline
Pro Tracker

Registered: 06/03/07
Posts: 1480
Loc: magnolia tx
One big factor you need to decide is what kind of range you want in a pointing dog. Some want to always have the dog in sight and some want them to really roll and cover ground. Of course thereís in between.

Range has a lot to do with the breeding and the breeder

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#7239199 - 07/29/18 06:12 PM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
nate33 Offline
Tracker

Registered: 11/16/16
Posts: 557
You can make vague generalizations, but every dog in a litter is going to be different and have different abilities ----- same with the breeds ------ it's a crap shoot. Parents will give you some guidance.

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#7239648 - 07/30/18 09:12 AM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
Mundo Offline
Bird Dog

Registered: 02/03/15
Posts: 291
Handling has more to do with time you spend with the dog than breed. You have a better chance of a good dog by going with a pointer--They haven't been corrupted by the pet or show trade. Setters, shorthairs and brits all do well on quail. I would steer clear of the more exotic upland breeds--smaller gene pool and they haven't been bred in the states for as many generations. You just are taking more of a chance with the rarer breeds.

Handling is a factor in judging field trials. Pointers dominate the field trials, followed by setters. GSPs Brits and Vislas are competitive in some open trials.

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#7239657 - 07/30/18 09:21 AM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
Dave Scott Offline
Tracker

Registered: 10/16/13
Posts: 513
I've been told pointers are hard headed, need a heavy hand, and run off to parts unknown. Setters are easier to train and don't run away but I'm not sure how well they do in hot weather, that got me wondering about German short hairs.

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#7239673 - 07/30/18 09:31 AM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
68rustbucket Online   content
Veteran Tracker

Registered: 10/21/08
Posts: 3197
Loc: San Marcos, TX
The first name is German-means hard headed

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#7240904 - 07/31/18 01:10 PM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
nate33 Offline
Tracker

Registered: 11/16/16
Posts: 557
first name German ------- hard headed ???????? I thought that referred to the women.

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#7242128 - 08/01/18 02:56 PM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
Dave Scott Offline
Tracker

Registered: 10/16/13
Posts: 513
Step lightly yall cowboy

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#7245505 - 08/04/18 06:31 PM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
RayB Online   content
red bone Bob

Registered: 11/22/09
Posts: 3624
Loc: New Braunfels TX USA
I love my setter but if your going to keep the dog in the house get a short haired dog. My mutt sheds enough to put hair on two dogs a day. German short hairs get a bad rap. Mine minds well and is only hard headed when he's protecting us from killer opossums or squirrels that get in the yard. He won't call off I have to go get him.
_________________________
There is time, and you must take it, to lay your hand on your dog's head as you walk past him lying on the floor or on his settle, time to talk with him, to remember with him, time to please him, time you can't buy back once he's gone" GBE

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#7249147 - 08/08/18 09:41 AM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
16ga Offline
Light Foot

Registered: 10/04/16
Posts: 38
Originally Posted By: Dave Scott
I've been told pointers are hard headed, need a heavy hand, and run off to parts unknown. Setters are easier to train and don't run away but I'm not sure how well they do in hot weather, that got me wondering about German short hairs.


Gross generalizations that have no validity. You have pointers winning in the coverdog trials, and setters winning horseback all age trials, albeit not as often as pointers. I've had all age bred pointers that didn't run enough and a nstra bred brittany that I'd see 2 to 3 times an hour. As already stated, you can't generalize about a breed, much less a litter. If you're looking for a specific type dog, find the person breeding that type dog, no matter what the breed. After that it's on you, or the pro you use, to train the dog to hunt the way you want to hunt.

There are run offs and self hunters in all breeds, but most often it is a learned trait. The earliest to develop and easiest dogs to break I've had were Miller bred pointers. My brittanys are a PIA compared to those dogs. Oh...and the part about pointers being aloof and non affectionate is baloney. Raise them right and they are exceptional pets.

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#7249181 - 08/08/18 10:09 AM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
68rustbucket Online   content
Veteran Tracker

Registered: 10/21/08
Posts: 3197
Loc: San Marcos, TX
My pointer would get in my lap if you let her. My Britt is the most compliant bird dog Iíve had.

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#7250428 - 08/09/18 12:28 PM Re: Quail Dog [Re: Dave Scott]
Smokey Bear Offline
Tracker

Registered: 05/11/17
Posts: 783
Loc: Texas
There are different lines within breeds. The best breeders strive to develop lines that strengthen the attributes they value the most. Bidability is an attribute you don't here much conversation about these days. Between e-collars, gps collars, and hunting out of utv's, reigning in and keeping up with a big running dog is a lot easier today. If you are looking for a dog that is easier to handle, seek out a breeder that views bidability as a priority. The previously mentioned Miller line of pointers are an example.

Choose the breed you think is best suited to the style of hunting you do. Then get a puppy from a line that is best suited to you.

You can greatly hedge your bets by getting a puppy out of a repeat breeding of a proven cross. When evaluating the quality of a particular cross, the lower performing dogs in a liter are the ones you want to pay particular attention to. In the best liters, the gap from top to bottom will be a small one. In a breeding that produces an exceptional liter, from the bottom up is where it is realized. A standout dog today hasn't changed much from what it was 50 years ago.

As far as breed comparing attributes and MY GENERALIZATIONS about EP's, Setters, and GSP's go:

EP's are the Ferrari of the pointing dogs. In big open country they can scortch the ground and sustain it like no other. The best GSP's and Setters are close but the EP is a specialist and is king in that respect.

Visually, a really nice setter is a thing of beauty to watch work. When it comes to aesthetics, they win. They are also much more susceptible to burrs.

In terms of versatility and adaptability the GSP wins among these three.

To the poster who inferred the rarer breeds are a gamble, I disagree. Doing your homework and understanding the strengths and weaknesses of a particular breed and line should allow you to have a good idea of what you should end up with. FWIW I currently run a Pudelpointer, which is one of the rarer breeds, so I am probably influenced by that.
_________________________
Smokey Bear---Lone Star State.

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