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#7083143 - 02/17/18 09:46 PM CWD prions can't infect humans
therancher Online   content
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 07/09/13
Posts: 6431
Loc: Mountain Home, Uvalde, and Big...
Well, at least according to this study. Which is just as valid as all other "studies".

They can't even FORCE CWD to infect most species of deer. But they want to tell us that it will naturally jump into primates... loser8

http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/sm...wasting_disease
_________________________
"I cant wait to see if he plays this week, and if he does if he can actually break 50 percent completion ratio. Haha or maybe even throw for 200 yards. Possibly break a QB rating of 75." - Texas Tatonka
www.bigironranchadventures.com

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#7083147 - 02/17/18 10:03 PM Re: CWD prions can't infect humans [Re: therancher]
maximus_flavius Offline
Tracker

Registered: 04/24/13
Posts: 873
We are all dead meat.

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#7083520 - 02/18/18 11:21 AM Re: CWD prions can't infect humans [Re: therancher]
Trash Fish and Cull Bucks Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 07/11/12
Posts: 231
The concern, however, is if exposure to rogue prions can potentially create a new TSE disease that is modified to be host-specific, as it appears to have been in the past. CWD likely came from scrapie, similar, but different diseases. Deer aren't supposed to be affected by scrapie, but somehow once 'accepted' in the host, the disease transformed into a new disease. The same thing occurred with mad cow and Varient CJD. vCJD came from BSE (mad cow), similar, but different disease (vCJD is even different from CJD). The prion-based disease again modified to a different host and created a new disease.
_________________________
The recreational value of game is inverse to the artificiality of its origin - Aldo Leopold

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#7083739 - 02/18/18 02:44 PM Re: CWD prions can't infect humans [Re: therancher]
eddy39 Offline
Green Horn

Registered: 02/18/18
Posts: 1
To All hunters,
Prions are amyloid proteins that build up in the tissues of the CWD-affected deer. Amyloid proteins do not proliferate but can increase in amount biochemically. Bacteria can induce formation of these amyloid proteins. These amyloid proteins (prions) are not infectious.

Research shows that the cause of CWD is a tiny bacterium. We have now grown this bacterium in broth culture and on agar plates so we now can develop a diagnostic test. This will be very important for hunters since the deer shows at least a 10 month incubation period where the deer is infectious yet shows no clinical signs. There is no way that a hunter can recognize an infected deer until the last stages of the disease.
Vaccines are common in controlling bacterial diseases. Brucella is controlled by a vaccine. You all know about pneumococcal vaccine. There are no antibiiotics that kill spiroplasma. There is no workable diagnostic serological test for the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. CWD has been experimentally transferred to cattle so I wouldn’t be secure in any natural barrier to infection. The incubation period for CWD may last months. The animals appear normal during the first 10 months of the incubation period.

Spiroplasma can be cultured and studied. A diagnostic test is now possible so that the CWD-affected animals can be culled. The diseased animals will be recognized by a simple serological test.
The source of the organism in nature can now be determined. Since the spiroplasma forms colonies on agar plates, we can now determine sensitivity to new antibiotics. A preventive vaccine is now possible.

We need more laboratories working on this problem from this perspective and that is why I published the method of isolation so any researchers with access to CWD materials can contribute.
Dr. Frank Bastian
tseresearchcenter.org

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#7083792 - 02/18/18 03:22 PM Re: CWD prions can't infect humans [Re: therancher]
flounder Offline
Bird Dog

Registered: 10/29/11
Posts: 273
Loc: 77518
Originally Posted By: therancher
Well, at least according to this study. Which is just as valid as all other "studies".

They can't even FORCE CWD to infect most species of deer. But they want to tell us that it will naturally jump into primates... loser8

http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/sm...wasting_disease



2017 PRION CONFERENCE

First evidence of intracranial and peroral transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) into Cynomolgus macaques: a work in progress

Stefanie Czub1, Walter Schulz-Schaeffer2, Christiane Stahl-Hennig3, Michael Beekes4, Hermann Schaetzl5 and Dirk Motzkus6 1

University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine/Canadian Food Inspection Agency; 2Universitatsklinikum des Saarlandes und Medizinische Fakultat der Universitat des Saarlandes; 3 Deutsches Primaten Zentrum/Goettingen; 4 Robert-Koch-Institut Berlin; 5 University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine; 6 presently: Boehringer Ingelheim Veterinary Research Center; previously: Deutsches Primaten Zentrum/Goettingen

This is a progress report of a project which started in 2009. 21 cynomolgus macaques were challenged with characterized CWD material from white-tailed deer (WTD) or elk by intracerebral (ic), oral, and skin exposure routes. Additional blood transfusion experiments are supposed to assess the CWD contamination risk of human blood product. Challenge materials originated from symptomatic cervids for ic, skin scarification and partially per oral routes (WTD brain). Challenge material for feeding of muscle derived from preclinical WTD and from preclinical macaques for blood transfusion experiments. We have confirmed that the CWD challenge material contained at least two different CWD agents (brain material) as well as CWD prions in muscle-associated nerves.

Here we present first data on a group of animals either challenged ic with steel wires or per orally and sacrificed with incubation times ranging from 4.5 to 6.9 years at postmortem. Three animals displayed signs of mild clinical disease, including anxiety, apathy, ataxia and/or tremor. In four animals wasting was observed, two of those had confirmed diabetes. All animals have variable signs of prion neuropathology in spinal cords and brains and by supersensitive IHC, reaction was detected in spinal cord segments of all animals. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA), real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuiC) and PET-blot assays to further substantiate these findings are on the way, as well as bioassays in bank voles and transgenic mice.

At present, a total of 10 animals are sacrificed and read-outs are ongoing. Preclinical incubation of the remaining macaques covers a range from 6.4 to 7.10 years. Based on the species barrier and an incubation time of > 5 years for BSE in macaques and about 10 years for scrapie in macaques, we expected an onset of clinical disease beyond 6 years post inoculation.

PRION 2017 DECIPHERING NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS

Subject: PRION 2017 CONFERENCE DECIPHERING NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS VIDEO

PRION 2017 CONFERENCE DECIPHERING NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS

*** PRION 2017 CONFERENCE VIDEO

https://www.youtube.com/embed/Vtt1kAVDhDQ

http://prion2017.org/programme/

Prion Infectivity in Fat of Deer with Chronic Wasting Disease▿

Brent Race#, Kimberly Meade-White#, Richard Race and Bruce Chesebro* + Author Affiliations

In mice, prion infectivity was recently detected in fat. Since ruminant fat is consumed by humans and fed to animals, we determined infectivity titers in fat from two CWD-infected deer. Deer fat devoid of muscle contained low levels of CWD infectivity and might be a risk factor for prion infection of other species.

http://jvi.asm.org/content/83/18/9608.full


Prions in Skeletal Muscles of Deer with Chronic Wasting Disease

Here bioassays in transgenic mice expressing cervid prion protein revealed the presence of infectious prions in skeletal muscles of CWD-infected deer, demonstrating that humans consuming or handling meat from CWD-infected deer are at risk to prion exposure.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/311/5764/1117.long


*** WDA 2016 NEW YORK ***

We found that CWD adapts to a new host more readily than BSE and that human PrP was unexpectedly prone to misfolding by CWD prions. In addition, we investigated the role of specific regions of the bovine, deer and human PrP protein in resistance to conversion by prions from another species. We have concluded that the human protein has a region that confers unusual susceptibility to conversion by CWD prions.

Wildlife Disease Risk Communication Research Contributes to Wildlife Trust Administration Exploring perceptions about chronic wasting disease risks among wildlife and agriculture professionals and stakeholders

http://www.wda2016.org/uploads/5/8/6/1/58613359/wda_2016_conference_proceedings_low_res.pdf

continued...

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#7083794 - 02/18/18 03:27 PM Re: CWD prions can't infect humans [Re: flounder]
flounder Offline
Bird Dog

Registered: 10/29/11
Posts: 273
Loc: 77518
Originally Posted By: flounder
Originally Posted By: therancher
CWD prions can't infect humans by the rancher -- Well, at least according to this study. Which is just as valid as all other "studies".

They can't even FORCE CWD to infect most species of deer. But they want to tell us that it will naturally jump into primates... loser8

http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/sm...wasting_disease


snip...

continued...



*** now, let’s see what the authors said about this casual link, personal communications years ago, and then the latest on the zoonotic potential from CWD to humans from the TOKYO PRION 2016 CONFERENCE.

see where it is stated NO STRONG evidence. so, does this mean there IS casual evidence ???? “Our conclusion stating that we found no strong evidence of CWD transmission to humans”


From: TSS (216-119-163-189.ipset45.wt.net)

Subject: CWD aka MAD DEER/ELK TO HUMANS ???

Date: September 30, 2002 at 7:06 am PST

From: "Belay, Ermias"

To: Cc: "Race, Richard (NIH)" ; ; "Belay, Ermias"

Sent: Monday, September 30, 2002 9:22 AM

Subject: RE: TO CDC AND NIH - PUB MED- 3 MORE DEATHS - CWD - YOUNG HUNTERS

Dear Sir/Madam,

In the Archives of Neurology you quoted (the abstract of which was attached to your email), we did not say CWD in humans will present like variant CJD. That assumption would be wrong. I encourage you to read the whole article and call me if you have questions or need more clarification (phone: 404-639-3091). Also, we do not claim that "no-one has ever been infected with prion disease from eating venison." Our conclusion stating that we found no strong evidence of CWD transmission to humans in the article you quoted or in any other forum is limited to the patients we investigated.

Ermias Belay, M.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

-----Original Message-----

From: Sent: Sunday, September 29, 2002 10:15 AM

To: rr26k@nih.gov; rrace@niaid.nih.gov; ebb8@CDC.GOV

Subject: TO CDC AND NIH - PUB MED- 3 MORE DEATHS - CWD - YOUNG HUNTERS

Sunday, November 10, 2002 6:26 PM ......snip........end..............TSS

Thursday, April 03, 2008

A prion disease of cervids: Chronic wasting disease 2008 1: Vet Res. 2008 Apr 3;39(4):41 A prion disease of cervids: Chronic wasting disease Sigurdson CJ.

snip...

*** twenty-seven CJD patients who regularly consumed venison were reported to the Surveillance Center***,

snip... full text ;

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/04/prion-disease-of-cervids-chronic.html


I urge everyone to watch this video closely...terry

*** you can see video here and interview with Jeff's Mom, and scientist telling you to test everything and potential risk factors for humans ***

https://histodb11.usz.ch/Images/videos/video-004/video-004.html


*** The potential impact of prion diseases on human health was greatly magnified by the recognition that interspecies transfer of BSE to humans by beef ingestion resulted in vCJD. While changes in animal feed constituents and slaughter practices appear to have curtailed vCJD, there is concern that CWD of free-ranging deer and elk in the U.S. might also cross the species barrier. Thus, consuming venison could be a source of human prion disease. Whether BSE and CWD represent interspecies scrapie transfer or are newly arisen prion diseases is unknown. Therefore, the possibility of transmission of prion disease through other food animals cannot be ruled out. There is evidence that vCJD can be transmitted through blood transfusion. There is likely a pool of unknown size of asymptomatic individuals infected with vCJD, and there may be asymptomatic individuals infected with the CWD equivalent. These circumstances represent a potential threat to blood, blood products, and plasma supplies.

http://cdmrp.army.mil/prevfunded/nprp/NPRP_Summit_Final_Report.pdf


BSE INQUIRY


CJD9/10022

October 1994

Mr R.N. Elmhirst Chairman British Deer Farmers Association Holly Lodge Spencers Lane

BerksWell Coventry CV7 7BZ

Dear Mr Elmhirst,

CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB DISEASE (CJD) SURVEILLANCE UNIT REPORT

Thank you for your recent letter concerning the publication of the third annual report from the CJD Surveillance Unit. I am sorry that you are dissatisfied with the way in which this report was published.

The Surveillance Unit is a completely independant outside body and the Department of Health is committed to publishing their reports as soon as they become available. In the circumstances it is not the practice to circulate the report for comment since the findings of the report would not be amended. In future we can ensure that the British Deer Farmers Association receives a copy of the report in advance of publication.

The Chief Medical Officer has undertaken to keep the public fully informed of the results of any research in respect of CJD. This report was entirely the work of the unit and was produced completely independantly of the the Department.

The statistical results reqarding the consumption of venison was put into perspective in the body of the report and was not mentioned at all in the press release. Media attention regarding this report was low key but gave a realistic presentation of the statistical findings of the Unit. This approach to publication was successful in that consumption of venison was highlighted only once by the media ie. in the News at one television proqramme.

I believe that a further statement about the report, or indeed statistical links between CJD and consumption of venison, would increase, and quite possibly give damaging credence, to the whole issue. From the low key media reports of which I am aware it seems unlikely that venison consumption will suffer adversely, if at all.

http://web.archive.org/web/20030511010117/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1994/10/00003001.pdf


*** The association between venison eating and risk of CJD shows similar pattern, with regular venison eating associated with a 9 FOLD INCREASE IN RISK OF CJD (p = 0.04). ***

*** The association between venison eating and risk of CJD shows similar pattern, with regular venison eating associated with a 9 FOLD INCREASE IN RISK OF CJD (p = 0.04). ***

*** The association between venison eating and risk of CJD shows similar pattern, with regular venison eating associated with a 9 FOLD INCREASE IN RISK OF CJD (p = 0.04). ***

There is some evidence that risk of CJD INCREASES WITH INCREASING FREQUENCY OF LAMB EATING (p = 0.02).

The evidence for such an association between beef eating and CJD is weaker (p = 0.14). When only controls for whom a relative was interviewed are included, this evidence becomes a little STRONGER (p = 0.08).

snip...

It was found that when veal was included in the model with another exposure, the association between veal and CJD remained statistically significant (p = < 0.05 for all exposures), while the other exposures ceased to be statistically significant (p = > 0.05).

snip...

In conclusion, an analysis of dietary histories revealed statistical associations between various meats/animal products and INCREASED RISK OF CJD. When some account was taken of possible confounding, the association between VEAL EATING AND RISK OF CJD EMERGED AS THE STRONGEST OF THESE ASSOCIATIONS STATISTICALLY. ...

snip...

In the study in the USA, a range of foodstuffs were associated with an increased risk of CJD, including liver consumption which was associated with an apparent SIX-FOLD INCREASE IN THE RISK OF CJD. By comparing the data from 3 studies in relation to this particular dietary factor, the risk of liver consumption became non-significant with an odds ratio of 1.2 (PERSONAL COMMUNICATION, PROFESSOR A. HOFMAN. ERASMUS UNIVERSITY, ROTTERDAM). (???...TSS)

snip...see full report ;

https://web.archive.org/web/20170126073306/http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20090505194948/http://bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1994/08/00004001.pdf

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#7083800 - 02/18/18 03:31 PM Re: CWD prions can't infect humans [Re: flounder]
flounder Offline
Bird Dog

Registered: 10/29/11
Posts: 273
Loc: 77518
Originally Posted By: flounder
Originally Posted By: therancher
Well, at least according to this study. Which is just as valid as all other "studies".

They can't even FORCE CWD to infect most species of deer. But they want to tell us that it will naturally jump into primates... loser8

http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/sm...wasting_disease


continued...



PRION 2015 CONFERENCE FT. COLLINS CWD RISK FACTORS TO HUMANS


*** LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACTS PRION 2015 CONFERENCE ***


O18


Zoonotic Potential of CWD Prions


Liuting Qing1, Ignazio Cali1,2, Jue Yuan1, Shenghai Huang3, Diane Kofskey1, Pierluigi Gambetti1, Wenquan Zou1, Qingzhong Kong1 1Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, 2Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy, 3Encore Health Resources, Houston, Texas, USA


*** These results indicate that the CWD prion has the potential to infect human CNS and peripheral lymphoid tissues and that there might be asymptomatic human carriers of CWD infection.


==================


***These results indicate that the CWD prion has the potential to infect human CNS and peripheral lymphoid tissues and that there might be asymptomatic human carriers of CWD infection.***


==================


P.105: RT-QuIC models trans-species prion transmission


Kristen Davenport, Davin Henderson, Candace Mathiason, and Edward Hoover Prion Research Center; Colorado State University; Fort Collins, CO USA


Conversely, FSE maintained sufficient BSE characteristics to more efficiently convert bovine rPrP than feline rPrP. Additionally, human rPrP was competent for conversion by CWD and fCWD.


***This insinuates that, at the level of protein:protein interactions, the barrier preventing transmission of CWD to humans is less robust than previously estimated.


================


***This insinuates that, at the level of protein:protein interactions, the barrier preventing transmission of CWD to humans is less robust than previously estimated.***


================


https://prion2015.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/programguide1.pdf


*** PRICE OF CWD TSE PRION POKER GOES UP 2014 ***


Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy TSE PRION update January 2, 2014


*** chronic wasting disease, there was no absolute barrier to conversion of the human prion protein.


*** Furthermore, the form of human PrPres produced in this in vitro assay when seeded with CWD, resembles that found in the most common human prion disease, namely sCJD of the MM1 subtype.


http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/20/1/13-0858_article.htm


http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2014/01/molecular-barriers-to-zoonotic.html


*** These results would seem to suggest that CWD does indeed have zoonotic potential, at least as judged by the compatibility of CWD prions and their human PrPC target. Furthermore, extrapolation from this simple in vitro assay suggests that if zoonotic CWD occurred, it would most likely effect those of the PRNP codon 129-MM genotype and that the PrPres type would be similar to that found in the most common subtype of sCJD (MM1).***


https://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/prion/article/28124/?nocache=112223249

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#7084008 - 02/18/18 06:30 PM Re: CWD prions can't infect humans [Re: eddy39]
therancher Online   content
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 07/09/13
Posts: 6431
Loc: Mountain Home, Uvalde, and Big...
Originally Posted By: eddy39
To All hunters,
Prions are amyloid proteins that build up in the tissues of the CWD-affected deer. Amyloid proteins do not proliferate but can increase in amount biochemically. Bacteria can induce formation of these amyloid proteins. These amyloid proteins (prions) are not infectious.

Research shows that the cause of CWD is a tiny bacterium. We have now grown this bacterium in broth culture and on agar plates so we now can develop a diagnostic test. This will be very important for hunters since the deer shows at least a 10 month incubation period where the deer is infectious yet shows no clinical signs. There is no way that a hunter can recognize an infected deer until the last stages of the disease.
Vaccines are common in controlling bacterial diseases. Brucella is controlled by a vaccine. You all know about pneumococcal vaccine. There are no antibiiotics that kill spiroplasma. There is no workable diagnostic serological test for the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. CWD has been experimentally transferred to cattle so I wouldn’t be secure in any natural barrier to infection. The incubation period for CWD may last months. The animals appear normal during the first 10 months of the incubation period.

Spiroplasma can be cultured and studied. A diagnostic test is now possible so that the CWD-affected animals can be culled. The diseased animals will be recognized by a simple serological test.
The source of the organism in nature can now be determined. Since the spiroplasma forms colonies on agar plates, we can now determine sensitivity to new antibiotics. A preventive vaccine is now possible.

We need more laboratories working on this problem from this perspective and that is why I published the method of isolation so any researchers with access to CWD materials can contribute.
Dr. Frank Bastian
tseresearchcenter.org


You're gonna have to link some peer reviewed published reports before anyone's gonna believe you. Because most of what you said up there runs counter to all the current valid data concerning cwd.
_________________________
"I cant wait to see if he plays this week, and if he does if he can actually break 50 percent completion ratio. Haha or maybe even throw for 200 yards. Possibly break a QB rating of 75." - Texas Tatonka
www.bigironranchadventures.com

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