Main Menu
Advertisement
Affiliates
Advertisement
Newest Members
jmrmem, Doublebarrl, Reedquinn30, Ron_I, Buddy490
62800 Registered Users
Top Posters
dogcatcher 83613
stxranchman 52093
RWH24 44568
rifleman 44289
BOBO the Clown 42874
bill oxner 41587
BMD 40619
Big Orn 37484
txshntr 34883
sig226fan (Rguns.com) 31419
facebook
Forum Stats
62800 Members
46 Forums
439957 Topics
6058589 Posts

Max Online: 16728 @ 03/25/12 08:51 AM
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >
Topic Options
#6961564 - 11/15/17 01:27 PM After the shot
Texas Dan Online   content
THF Celebrity

Registered: 07/28/08
Posts: 12472
With so many newbies hanging around these threads, a good discussion of key tips in retrieving deer seems in order.

Let me start it off with a couple points, those being seeing the shot and listening closely afterwards.

In most cases, seeing the shot so that you can recall the deer's reaction is a very good thing. With experience and spending time listening to others, you can make at least a fair determination of where the deer was hit, so long as you keep in mind that sometimes a hit deer will show little or no reaction. However, seeing the shot can also mean losing concentration on the specific aim point on the deer's body to glance at the antlers or size of the deer. When this happens, the shooter allows the aim point to drift, often resulting in a miss or even worse, a non-fatal hit on a deer that will never be recovered. An old timer I knew had a term for it- losing him in the cross hairs.

The second point is to listen closely as the deer bolts away after the shot since you can often hear the sound of the deer as it crashes through the brush. In some cases, you might even hear the deer as it crashes into something or even when it hits the ground.

Now of course, these and other comments to be shared mean nothing to those who always have their deer fall dead right there (DRT). As for the rest of us, I'm sure there are many who would enjoy hearing from those who have become very knowledgeable on what you should do after the shot.
_________________________
Dan,

Spring, Texas

Top
#6961569 - 11/15/17 01:31 PM Re: After the shot [Re: Texas Dan]
hook_n_line Offline
Extreme Tracker

Registered: 01/20/12
Posts: 4705
I just shake a lot. grin
Seriously though, this is good advice.
_________________________
Sometimes it's hard being me! But somebody has to do it.

Top
#6961570 - 11/15/17 01:32 PM Re: After the shot [Re: Texas Dan]
SapperTitan Online   content
Taking Requests

Registered: 11/17/10
Posts: 22820
Loc: Killeen/Ft Hood, TX
If I don't see the deer go down I always wait 15 minutes or so for it to die before going and looking for blood at the place he was shot. With a bow id wait even longer not to jump a wounded deer. I also try and look for reference points so its easier to find where he was at when I shot and last place I seen him. Its also a good idea to take something you can mark the blood trail with especially if its a long trail that way if you get off the trail its easy to find it again.
_________________________
If you have IG or FB go give me a follow at TexasKillingFields



Top
#6961575 - 11/15/17 01:36 PM Re: After the shot [Re: Texas Dan]
BUCKitHEAD Offline
Green Horn

Registered: 07/30/15
Posts: 6
I always find myself taking deer in thick country, and never out in the open. The first thought no matter how seasoned a hunter is always to go towards your kill. I have to tell myself every time to start at the location he/she was standing when I took the shot. If you take a late evening shot time can be of up most priority. Therefore, getting on the blood trail and setting a course to find him (when you don't hear it) is imperative.

Top
#6961580 - 11/15/17 01:41 PM Re: After the shot [Re: Texas Dan]
hook_n_line Offline
Extreme Tracker

Registered: 01/20/12
Posts: 4705
For sure, give the animal time to expire, almost any dog will find a dead deer if it comes down to it.
_________________________
Sometimes it's hard being me! But somebody has to do it.

Top
#6961615 - 11/15/17 02:03 PM Re: After the shot [Re: BUCKitHEAD]
Pitchfork Predator Offline
THF Celebrity

Registered: 01/25/13
Posts: 12982
Loc: Murphy, TX Dickens county
Originally Posted By: BUCKitHEAD
I always find myself taking deer in thick country, and never out in the open. The first thought no matter how seasoned a hunter is always to go towards your kill. I have to tell myself every time to start at the location he/she was standing when I took the shot. If you take a late evening shot time can be of up most priority. Therefore, getting on the blood trail and setting a course to find him (when you don't hear it) is imperative.


True, but more important to give them time to die. Many hunters start the track too early. They jump them up where they probably would of expired if they gave them more time to do so. You are also really stressing the deer out if you jump them before they expire. This usually results in gamey tasting table fare if you are luck enough to find them.
_________________________
Marc C. Helfrich
Retirement Planner

www.insured-wealth.com
469-323-8920

Top
#6961627 - 11/15/17 02:10 PM Re: After the shot [Re: Pitchfork Predator]
BUCKitHEAD Offline
Green Horn

Registered: 07/30/15
Posts: 6
Completely agree with you Pitchfork. I will usually have a celebratory drink while giving the time to wait him out. As far a gamey flavor that is another discussion. I have found the quicker you get the animals hide off the better. Never heard anything about the flavor of fear?

Top
#6961632 - 11/15/17 02:16 PM Re: After the shot [Re: BUCKitHEAD]
Pitchfork Predator Offline
THF Celebrity

Registered: 01/25/13
Posts: 12982
Loc: Murphy, TX Dickens county
Originally Posted By: BUCKitHEAD
Completely agree with you Pitchfork. I will usually have a celebratory drink while giving the time to wait him out. As far a gamey flavor that is another discussion. I have found the quicker you get the animals hide off the better. Never heard anything about the flavor of fear?


You are correct getting the meat cooled down ASAP, which skinning does better than anything else.

There were interesting studies done that showed deer that were stressed out before dying were tougher and gamier tasting than ones that were not.
_________________________
Marc C. Helfrich
Retirement Planner

www.insured-wealth.com
469-323-8920

Top
#6961656 - 11/15/17 02:35 PM Re: After the shot [Re: Texas Dan]
Captain Luke Offline
Pro Tracker

Registered: 10/11/11
Posts: 1134
Loc: Duval County, Starr County
ALWAYS make sure to make instant mental note of where the deer was standing when you shot him. Sometimes that is the key to even having a decent chance of recovery when they run.
_________________________
If you want some friendly advice, get a haircut and take a bath. You wouldn't get hassled so much.



Top
#6961662 - 11/15/17 02:41 PM Re: After the shot [Re: Texas Dan]
Hunter Daddy Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 08/27/14
Posts: 160
There are a lot of variables to consider after the shot. First, did I feel very confident that I put the bullet on the mark. If so, I wait 5 minutes then get out to look for the animal. Or, do I think that maybe the shot may have been a bit off (perhaps a long shot), then I may wait 30 minutes before I go looking. If I think I may have missed or hit the animal, then I may wait longer. If darkness is coming fast then I will get out of the blind after 5 minutes and go to the spot and start tracking (we have lots of coyotes that can get to a wounded deer quick.)If its a morning shoot then I will definitely wait longer. But, every time I do shoot and the deer runs, I do wait with my rifle ready for a second shot just in case the deer comes back out again, wounded or not. I shoot a .243 rifle so knock-down shots behind the shoulder are very rare. Of course, a neck shot will put a deer down very time. If you aim at the neck and it runs, then you just missed!

Top
#6961676 - 11/15/17 02:58 PM Re: After the shot [Re: Texas Dan]
quackedup Offline
Outdoorsman

Registered: 04/18/05
Posts: 59
I also say make a mental note of the last place you saw the deer run. Mark the tree, rock, brush, etc. Go to the spot where the animal was standing when shot and look for blood. then go to last place you saw the deer running. We did that one time and discovered there was a dry creek bed just past the brush where we last saw the deer. I remember reading or hearing someone say that deer usually run to water when wounded. We got in the creek bed and while looking both directions found blood in the spot i was standing. 20-30 yards down the dry channel there was the deer.

Top
#6961684 - 11/15/17 03:02 PM Re: After the shot [Re: Texas Dan]
Texas Dan Online   content
THF Celebrity

Registered: 07/28/08
Posts: 12472
There is much to be said in using a double mantle, gas or propane lantern when looking for a downed deer at night. You'll be amazed at what you can overlook with that $150 super bright flashlight.
_________________________
Dan,

Spring, Texas

Top
#6961698 - 11/15/17 03:13 PM Re: After the shot [Re: Captain Luke]
titan2232 Offline
Extreme Tracker

Registered: 12/29/14
Posts: 3816
Loc: Conroe, TX
Originally Posted By: Captain Luke
ALWAYS make sure to make instant mental note of where the deer was standing when you shot him. Sometimes that is the key to even having a decent chance of recovery when they run.


Agreed and this is more challenging that you'd think sometimes.

The blood trial often goes on a very different angle than the angle you pictured when you shot it.

Even when shot by a feeder the depth the animal was standing can be drastically different than you pictured during the shot
_________________________


Top
#6961724 - 11/15/17 03:37 PM Re: After the shot [Re: titan2232]
Captain Luke Offline
Pro Tracker

Registered: 10/11/11
Posts: 1134
Loc: Duval County, Starr County
Originally Posted By: titan2232
Originally Posted By: Captain Luke
ALWAYS make sure to make instant mental note of where the deer was standing when you shot him. Sometimes that is the key to even having a decent chance of recovery when they run.


Agreed and this is more challenging that you'd think sometimes.

The blood trial often goes on a very different angle than the angle you pictured when you shot it.

Even when shot by a feeder the depth the animal was standing can be drastically different than you pictured during the shot

Exactly right. On Sunday, I shot a pig right under my feeder and it ran 20 yards. An hour later, I shot another pig under the same feeder and it dropped dead right there. When I went to recover them, I was surprised to see that the pig that I had shot earlier in the morning had actually been standing about 15 yards farther than the 2nd pig. I originally thought that they both had been standing around the same spot.
_________________________
If you want some friendly advice, get a haircut and take a bath. You wouldn't get hassled so much.



Top
#6961925 - 11/15/17 06:35 PM Re: After the shot [Re: Texas Dan]
Texas Dan Online   content
THF Celebrity

Registered: 07/28/08
Posts: 12472
One of the oldest and most unsubstantiated claims I've ever heard is that wounded deer usually run towards water. Lots of theories behind this one. I have first hand knowledge of two deer that were found next to ponds, and have helped retrieve at least three deer out of creeks.
_________________________
Dan,

Spring, Texas

Top
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >



© 2004-2016 OUTDOOR SITES NETWORK all rights reserved USA and Worldwide