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#6929795 - 10/23/17 08:26 AM Ageing meat Question
chrswr Offline
Outdoorsman

Registered: 12/31/15
Posts: 80
Loc: Leander, TX
Is there any difference what so ever in

Letting a deer hang for 5 to 10 days (if I am so lucky to have that many days in a row cold enough in central texas)

vs

having it quartered and sitting in a cooler for that time (adding fresh ice and draining water daily)

Thanks

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#6929798 - 10/23/17 08:30 AM Re: Ageing meat Question [Re: chrswr]
redchevy Offline
THF Celebrity

Registered: 10/25/04
Posts: 26255
Loc: Texas
I highly doubt you will get 10 days in a row to hang a deer in texas.

I have processed a large number of deer and can honestly say I have never noticed much of a difference between eating only hours after the deer died or after it has been aged for a week or two.

Keep it clean keep it cold a prepare it properly and it will be good.
_________________________
It's hell eatin em live

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#6929799 - 10/23/17 08:30 AM Re: Ageing meat Question [Re: chrswr]
fouzman Offline
Pro Tracker

Registered: 08/09/10
Posts: 1584
Loc: Houston, TX
Yes, but I like to hang mine in a walk-in with constant temperature of 38 degrees, hide on.

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#6929819 - 10/23/17 08:44 AM Re: Ageing meat Question [Re: fouzman]
QuitShootinYoungBucks Offline
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 11/01/12
Posts: 8014
Loc: Lubbock, TX
Originally Posted By: fouzman
Yes, but I like to hang mine in a walk-in with constant temperature of 38 degrees, hide on.


I agree with hanging if you're set up to do so. Found this on Wikipedia:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanging_(meat)

The process of meat hanging involves hanging the meat (usually beef) in a controlled environment. The meat hanging room must be temperature controlled from between 33 and 37 degrees Fahrenheit (1-3 degrees Celsius). It is such a small window in temperature because the meat will spoil if the room is too hot and the process of dry aging stops if the water in the meat freezes. Furthermore, due to the water needing to slowly evaporate the room must be kept to a humidity of around 85%. Also, to prevent bacteria developing on the meat, the room must be kept well ventilated. The meat must be furthermore checked on in regular intervals to ensure that the meat does not spoil and the process is working correctly.[3]

Meat hanging allows processes to continue in the meat that would normally cease in dead animals. For example, the muscles in the meat continue to use the oxygen that is in the proteins of the blood. This normal biological process creates a chemical by-product known as lactic acid. Since the blood is no longer being circulated through the body, the lactic acid starts to break down the muscle and connective tissues around it.[1]

The process takes, at a minimum, eleven days. At this point, the meat will noticeably taste better. However, the longer the meat is hung, the better the flavor will be. This length of time also results in a greater chance that the meat will spoil. Therefore, most companies will only hang meat for 20–30 days.[3] Furthermore, dry aged meat will shrink, as much of the water has been evaporated. This loss of mass causes the meat to shrink 10-15% in size.[1]

Beef’s appearance changes through the dry aging process. The meat will change color from red to purple and will be much firmer than fresh meat.[1]
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#6929897 - 10/23/17 09:30 AM Re: Ageing meat Question [Re: redchevy]
ckat Offline
Pro Tracker

Registered: 12/02/09
Posts: 1132
Loc: Lubbock Area
Originally Posted By: redchevy
I highly doubt you will get 10 days in a row to hang a deer in texas.

I have processed a large number of deer and can honestly say I have never noticed much of a difference between eating only hours after the deer died or after it has been aged for a week or two.

Keep it clean keep it cold a prepare it properly and it will be good.


It is rare, but does exist. I was able to hang a doe that I shot few years ago for 24 days before butchering.

My "rules" to hang have always been:
- Must get a good initial chill (35 degrees or cooler) for several hours within just a couple of hours of harvest
- Once chilled, 50 degrees is my max daytime temperature for continued hanging (as long as nightly re-chills exist)
- I prefer to hang the deer in full shade with adequate air movement.

On the noted doe, I actually had to move her into the insulated barn twice to thaw her out. I can say without question, that she was the best venison I have ever had. Super tender with no gamy flavors (which I believe mostly comes from overcooking.)

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#6930728 - 10/23/17 08:28 PM Re: Ageing meat Question [Re: chrswr]
waderaider1 Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 09/10/07
Posts: 187
Loc: San Antonio,Tx
i have my processor hang mine 14 days before processing. when we place in the cooler muscles still twiching. if in the evening and is going to cool in to the low to upper 30's or cooler we let it cool down overnight before placing in the cooler. My processor is in Fedor texas. his name is Chester Jautzla. excellent suasage maker.

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#6930836 - 10/23/17 09:31 PM Re: Ageing meat Question [Re: fouzman]
Simple Searcher Online   content
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 12/30/12
Posts: 5341
Loc: Helotes, Hext
Originally Posted By: fouzman
Yes, but I like to hang mine in a walk-in with constant temperature of 38 degrees, hide on.

That's the trick. Hide on saves a lot of meat and time removing that dried up shell too. Our walk-in run will run not stop till February.
And the meat is so much better, even a noticeable difference on the burger meat.
We do go ahead and remove the tenderloins before we hang them.
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"Man is still a hunter, still a simple searcher after meat..." Robert C. Ruark

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