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#6762251 - 05/12/17 09:43 AM Stock refinishing questions
Deerhunter61 Online   content
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 08/27/08
Posts: 6845
Loc: DFW
What is the best way to remove a lacquered finish? Will a toothbrush be enough to get it out of the checkering? Or would I need to use a wire brush?

Thanks,

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#6762260 - 05/12/17 09:54 AM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Deerhunter61]
Colt W. Knight Offline
Veteran Tracker

Registered: 03/22/11
Posts: 2090
Loc: West Virginia
There is not easy answer to this question. First, you need to know what kind of finish is on the gun stock to find the best stripper. For example, folks commonly refer to lacquered finish as any gloss finish. However, lacquer is specific type of clearcoat/paint that is generally cellulose or acrylic based that uses an acetone as a solution media. The best way to strip a lacquer finish is to simply use lacquer thinner or acetone. Brush it on, when it starts wrinkling. Wipe it off with a rag damp with lacquer thinner/acetone. Alcohol and things like bug spray will also strip lacquer finishes, but not as well. Another common clear coat used by DIYers and wood working folks is polyurethane. Polyurethane is oil based (with exceptions - there are water based polyurethanes, and these finishes are best removed with either chemical stripper like citrus stripper or a heat gun and scraper. These are generally poor quality finishes and you don't see manufacturers using it. Most gun manufacturers are going to a very strong polyester finish which is very difficult to strip. They generally come off using hard core strippers like Airplane Stripper. You need excellent ventilation, gloves, and skin protection to use these. Another common finish would be enamel, and most strippers, acetone, alcohol or mineral spirits will remove those. Shellac, which was more common a generation or two ago is thinned and stripped with alcohol. Varnishes are mixes of drying oils and polyurethanes for the most part and are easily stripped with citrus stripper or mineral spirits.

Of course, in modern times, the rules of clearcoat/paint are extremely blurred because most finishes incorporate modern chemistry and are mixes of enamel, poly, and lacquer with waterbased becoming ever more popular.

Hope that helped. The airplane stripper will remove anything. It brushes on, and is in goo form. You can then use a soft bristle cleaning brush to wipe it out of the checkering and remove the finish. A nylon or brass bristle brush will work fine. IT may melt of toothbrush, haven't tried that.




Edited by Colt W. Knight (05/12/17 09:58 AM)

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#6762387 - 05/12/17 11:42 AM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Deerhunter61]
Buzzsaw Online   content
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 06/29/11
Posts: 9494
Loc: Frisco, Texas
What finish does a Pre 64 model 70 have?
_________________________
"I ain't here for a long time, I'm here for a good time"
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#6762396 - 05/12/17 12:05 PM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Deerhunter61]
Deerhunter61 Online   content
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 08/27/08
Posts: 6845
Loc: DFW
Thanks Colt! Where can I find Airplane Stripper?

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#6762424 - 05/12/17 12:39 PM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Deerhunter61]
Deerhunter61 Online   content
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 08/27/08
Posts: 6845
Loc: DFW
If I wanted a factory like finish what should I use after I strip it?

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#6762712 - 05/12/17 06:45 PM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Deerhunter61]
Colt W. Knight Offline
Veteran Tracker

Registered: 03/22/11
Posts: 2090
Loc: West Virginia
Unless you have spray equipment, I would stick something like Tru Oil, just be prepared to do all the prep work and apply a million coats. It can turn out great though.

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#6762713 - 05/12/17 06:46 PM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Deerhunter61]
Colt W. Knight Offline
Veteran Tracker

Registered: 03/22/11
Posts: 2090
Loc: West Virginia
You can buy airplane stripper at automotive stores and even Wal-Mart over by the Bondo

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#6764106 - 05/14/17 06:48 PM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Colt W. Knight]
Marc in Bastrop Offline
Tracker

Registered: 11/02/10
Posts: 856
Loc: Bastrop County
Originally Posted By: Colt W. Knight
There is not easy answer to this question. First, you need to know what kind of finish is on the gun stock to find the best stripper. For example, folks commonly refer to lacquered finish as any gloss finish. However, lacquer is specific type of clearcoat/paint that is generally cellulose or acrylic based that uses an acetone as a solution media. The best way to strip a lacquer finish is to simply use lacquer thinner or acetone. Brush it on, when it starts wrinkling. Wipe it off with a rag damp with lacquer thinner/acetone. Alcohol and things like bug spray will also strip lacquer finishes, but not as well. Another common clear coat used by DIYers and wood working folks is polyurethane. Polyurethane is oil based (with exceptions - there are water based polyurethanes, and these finishes are best removed with either chemical stripper like citrus stripper or a heat gun and scraper. These are generally poor quality finishes and you don't see manufacturers using it. Most gun manufacturers are going to a very strong polyester finish which is very difficult to strip. They generally come off using hard core strippers like Airplane Stripper. You need excellent ventilation, gloves, and skin protection to use these. Another common finish would be enamel, and most strippers, acetone, alcohol or mineral spirits will remove those. Shellac, which was more common a generation or two ago is thinned and stripped with alcohol. Varnishes are mixes of drying oils and polyurethanes for the most part and are easily stripped with citrus stripper or mineral spirits.

Of course, in modern times, the rules of clearcoat/paint are extremely blurred because most finishes incorporate modern chemistry and are mixes of enamel, poly, and lacquer with waterbased becoming ever more popular.

Hope that helped. The airplane stripper will remove anything. It brushes on, and is in goo form. You can then use a soft bristle cleaning brush to wipe it out of the checkering and remove the finish. A nylon or brass bristle brush will work fine. IT may melt of toothbrush, haven't tried that.




Thank you for this information! It is valuable to me.

Marc
_________________________
A Democracy is when two wolves and a lamb vote on the dinner menu. That is why this country was not designed to be a Democracy.

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#6764168 - 05/14/17 07:49 PM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Deerhunter61]
Deerhunter61 Online   content
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 08/27/08
Posts: 6845
Loc: DFW
Ugh...what a pain in the but! I watched a vid on YouTube and it looked pretty easy....BUT I really didn't think it'd be that easy but then I didn't really think it'd be this big of a pain in the but either! Ugh...two coats and still not even close. Still, once it's done it'll be done and then I get to the part that hopefully will go much better.

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#6764176 - 05/14/17 07:53 PM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Deerhunter61]
Colt W. Knight Offline
Veteran Tracker

Registered: 03/22/11
Posts: 2090
Loc: West Virginia
Refinishing sucks. Folks ask me to refinish guitars a lot. I tell them I will build them a new body and paint it cheaper than I'd charge to refinish

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#6764192 - 05/14/17 08:11 PM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Buzzsaw]
RiverRider Online   content
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 11/11/07
Posts: 7111
Loc: Wise Co.
Originally Posted By: Buzzsaw
What finish does a Pre 64 model 70 have?



Buzz, they used a finishing process where lacquers were applied to pre-64 M70 stocks in a series of steps. The process was modified at various times.
_________________________


Originally Posted By: Ronald Reagan
It's not that liberals are not smart, it's just that so much of what they know isn't so.

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#6764218 - 05/14/17 08:43 PM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Deerhunter61]
Colt W. Knight Offline
Veteran Tracker

Registered: 03/22/11
Posts: 2090
Loc: West Virginia
Winchester would have used shellac in the early part of the 1900s, once lacquer was developed in the 1920s, most manufacturing switched over to lacquer because it's a better finish that holds up better, sprays on nicer, and buffs out beautifully. I think Winchester switched to lacquer ~1930s. If someone requested an oil finish, Winchester would have applied a boiled linseed oil finish. Terms like varnish and lacquer get used as general terms for any clear coat, so a lot of bad info gets thrown around because of bad terminology. Lacquer and shellac are both evaporative finishes, so they don't cure chemically. The solvents simple evaporate over time. They are also porous finishes, so they are prone to moisture damage and shrinkage. Lacquer, especially, will sink into the grain and oxidize, making an old lacquer finish look like an oil finish. Shellac will behave similarly.

Winchester, like any company would have tried new things and had issues with suppliers, so I've heard they used varnishes and different oil finishes after wwii

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#6764239 - 05/14/17 09:00 PM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Deerhunter61]
RiverRider Online   content
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 11/11/07
Posts: 7111
Loc: Wise Co.
One step on the early Model 70s included application of lacquer that had carnuba was in it, but during WW II supplies diminished, so a modification of the process was adopted. The Rifleman's Rifle by Roger C. Rule is full of all kinds of info. I wish it was what I refer to as "light reading," but it is not.
_________________________


Originally Posted By: Ronald Reagan
It's not that liberals are not smart, it's just that so much of what they know isn't so.

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#6764341 - 05/14/17 11:37 PM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Deerhunter61]
dogcatcher Online   content
THF Celebrity

Registered: 07/17/06
Posts: 82331
Loc: Abilene or on the road...
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Combat Infantryman, the ultimate hunter where the prey shoots back.
"Illegitimus non carborundum est"

_______ Old style calls for today's outdoorsman_________

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#6765022 - 05/15/17 06:48 PM Re: Stock refinishing questions [Re: Deerhunter61]
Slow Drifter Offline


Registered: 04/09/09
Posts: 4342
Loc: Central Texas
Honestly? The last stock I refinished, I had done. I didn't go to a gunsmith, though. I took the stocks to one of those un-finished furniture places. They all have finishing booths in the back, and all the equipment and young horsepower to run it. It was an original Wichester Model 63 that "came with" a barn I bought. There was enough finish left to show them what I wanted. It turned out beautiful.
_________________________
"I have no idea what WW-III will be fought with, but WW-IV will be fought with sticks and stones."

A. Einstein


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