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#6408860 - 08/15/16 10:06 AM Best Herbicide For Fence Lines
fouzman Offline
Pro Tracker

Registered: 08/09/10
Posts: 1014
Loc: Houston, TX
Have an electric fence with grass grown up all around it. What's the best herbicide to knock this stuff down fast? Have sprayers and equipment.

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#6408865 - 08/15/16 10:09 AM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: fouzman]
Stompy Online   content
Extreme Tracker

Registered: 06/13/10
Posts: 3879
Loc: Breckenridge Tx
I just use Roundup on all my fences. I buy it at Tractor supply in the 2.5 gallon jug. I tried their store brand (a little cheaper) and it worked, just not as well as Roundup.
_________________________
www.jaranchhunting.com
Cabin Rentals on the ranch for Hubbard Creek Lake

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#6409194 - 08/15/16 02:37 PM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: fouzman]
jeffbird Online   content


Registered: 03/09/09
Posts: 1723
Unless there is a compelling need, avoid Roundup. If you do handle it, make sure to use best practices to avoid skin contact or inhalation. There is evidence building to implicate it as increasing the risk of prostate cancer, which is already a significant risk for men and some, but lesser, evidence associating it with increases in breast cancer.

See the body of the text here (it does not copy and paste very well):

http://www.iarc.fr/en/media-centre/iarcnews/pdf/MonographVolume112.pdf




Here is some general info about cancer and other ag chemicals: http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/ahs-fact-sheet


What have researchers learned so far about farmers and cancer risk?

Most of the cancer research in the AHS has focused on pesticides, which are chemicals used to kill invasive insects, weeds, or small animals. In some cases, relationships between these pesticides and human cancer were examined for the first time in the AHS.

Thus far, researchers have evaluated more than 20 pesticides to determine whether the farmers who use them have increased risks of developing cancer. Some of these analyses have shown that people exposed to certain pesticides have an increased risk of developing certain cancers, but further research is needed to confirm these findings and to evaluate the potential mechanisms by which pesticides might influence cancer risk.

For example, a study from the AHS reported in 2009 that people who use the weed killer imazethapyr have increased risks of bladder cancer and colon cancer. Imazethapyr is in a class of chemicals known as aromatic amines. It was first used in the United States in 1989, and, since then, has been one of the most commonly used herbicides for killing weeds in soybean, dry bean, alfalfa, and other crop fields.

Studies in mice and rats led the EPA to classify imazethapyr as unlikely to be a human carcinogen. But, in the AHS, people with the highest cumulative lifetime exposure had more than twice the risk (137 percent increase in risk) of developing bladder cancer compared with those who had no exposure to the chemical. Similarly, the risk of colon cancer (mostly tumors in the proximal colon, where food enters during digestion) was nearly twice as high as normal (78 percent increased risk) among farmers who had the highest level of exposure compared with those who had no exposure to the chemical.

In addition, a condition called monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), which commonly precedes multiple myeloma, was found in blood samples of men in the AHS at twice the rate it was found in blood samples of men in Minnesota who were not part of the AHS cohort. This increased risk of MGUS was observed among men who used the chlorinated insecticide dieldrin, the fumigant mixture carbon-tetrachloride/carbon disulfide, the fungicide chlorothalonil, and possibly other pesticides. Now, a larger study within the AHS is looking more closely at the risk of MGUS with use of specific pesticides.

In 2011, AHS researchers reported an analysis of farmers who use the weed killer atrazine, which is a type of chemical known as a triazine. In this analysis, farmers who used atrazine the most often had a similar overall cancer risk to those who used atrazine the least often, but those with the highest exposures had a slightly increased risk of thyroid cancer. However, the number of cancer cases was too few for the finding to be considered conclusive.

Atrazine causes mammary tumors in rats but is not classified as a carcinogen in humans. Atrazine is an endocrine disruptor—meaning that it interferes with normal hormone signals in the body—as demonstrated in amphibians, birds, and rodents that have been exposed to it at high concentrations.

More information about what researchers have learned about cancer, other health problems, and risk factors among farmers is available in the AHS publications list.

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#6409200 - 08/15/16 02:40 PM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: fouzman]
scalebuster Online   content
Pro Tracker

Registered: 11/25/10
Posts: 1919
RM43. Nothing will grow back for a year.

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#6409237 - 08/15/16 03:00 PM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: fouzman]
TexasKC Online   content
Pro Tracker

Registered: 12/30/12
Posts: 1366
Loc: Houston & Lexington, Texas
I use the 41% stuff with sufactant from Tractor Supply. $54/2.5 gals. It does take a few days longer to work than Roundup but I'm cheap. LOL

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#6409315 - 08/15/16 03:47 PM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: fouzman]
cabosandinh Online   content
Pro Tracker

Registered: 08/12/13
Posts: 1158
Loc: Dallas, TX
i don't believe in chemicals like jeff mentioned above

swimming pool salt will do the trick and it's pretty cheap
$5 for 50 lbs bag

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#6409527 - 08/15/16 05:44 PM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: cabosandinh]
Big_Ag Offline
Pro Tracker

Registered: 12/23/12
Posts: 1010
Loc: Denton or Knox County
Originally Posted By: cabosandinh
i don't believe in chemicals like jeff mentioned above

swimming pool salt will do the trick and it's pretty cheap
$5 for 50 lbs bag


Tell me more. How do apply it?

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#6409712 - 08/15/16 06:48 PM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: Stompy]
AvianQuest Offline
Light Foot

Registered: 11/15/14
Posts: 46
Loc: Cypress, Texas
Originally Posted By: Stompy
I just use Roundup on all my fences. I buy it at Tractor supply in the 2.5 gallon jug. I tried their store brand (a little cheaper) and it worked, just not as well as Roundup.


It's absolutely the same thing (41% Glyphosate) and it should work the same as the Roundup brand. It would have to be used side-by-side at the same time to demonstrate that as plant growth stages and weather has its effect.

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#6409716 - 08/15/16 06:50 PM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: fouzman]
AvianQuest Offline
Light Foot

Registered: 11/15/14
Posts: 46
Loc: Cypress, Texas
Originally Posted By: fouzman
Have an electric fence with grass grown up all around it. What's the best herbicide to knock this stuff down fast? Have sprayers and equipment.


Anything that knocks it down fast is just defoliating the leaves and the plant will come back. A herbicide like Roundup (Glyphosate) kills the roots and takes the whole plant down for good.

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#6409787 - 08/15/16 07:24 PM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: fouzman]
Mr. T. Online   content
Pro Tracker

Registered: 11/05/14
Posts: 1625
Loc: Fort Worth - Hunt in Eastland ...
I use a product that I get at Tractor Supply...It is 41% Glyphosate, same as Round-up. I also put in about one tea spoon of liquid dish-washing detergent to 15 gallons. It seems to help the product adhere to the weeds better. The main key that I see in killing the plants is to not have rain for at least 8 hours after you spray it so that the plant can absorb it well.
_________________________
Ski cabin rental in Pagosa Springs.
www.pagosaspringscabin.com

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#6409945 - 08/15/16 08:49 PM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: Mr. T.]
AvianQuest Offline
Light Foot

Registered: 11/15/14
Posts: 46
Loc: Cypress, Texas
Originally Posted By: Mr. T.
I use a product that I get at Tractor Supply...It is 41% Glyphosate, same as Round-up. I also put in about one tea spoon of liquid dish-washing detergent to 15 gallons. It seems to help the product adhere to the weeds better. The main key that I see in killing the plants is to not have rain for at least 8 hours after you spray it so that the plant can absorb it well.


Both FarmWorks and Pronto are Roundup generics sold by Tractor Supply. But unlike Roundup they already have a surfactant in the mix. Adding more in the form of detergent may be counter productive

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#6410774 - 08/16/16 11:05 AM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: cabosandinh]
Always ready 2 hunt Online   content
Bird Dog

Registered: 07/31/15
Posts: 426
Originally Posted By: cabosandinh
i don't believe in chemicals like jeff mentioned above

swimming pool salt will do the trick and it's pretty cheap
$5 for 50 lbs bag


Cabo, how are you applying this?

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#6410798 - 08/16/16 11:19 AM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: Always ready 2 hunt]
cabosandinh Online   content
Pro Tracker

Registered: 08/12/13
Posts: 1158
Loc: Dallas, TX
Originally Posted By: Always ready 2 hunt
Originally Posted By: cabosandinh
i don't believe in chemicals like jeff mentioned above

swimming pool salt will do the trick and it's pretty cheap
$5 for 50 lbs bag


Cabo, how are you applying this?


"
Originally Posted By: cabosandinh
i don't believe in chemicals like jeff mentioned above

swimming pool salt will do the trick and it's pretty cheap
$5 for 50 lbs bag


Tell me more. How do apply it?

"

vinegar
pool salt
Dawn soap

Use any sprayer, ATV mounted , tractor mounted, back mount etc ..

4-5 lb salt
1 gallon vinegar
2 gallon water
1/2 cup Dawn soap ( to stick to leaves, stems )

mix, spray on leaves and at root
spray more often at the beginning, til you see brown leaves

play around with your concentration of salt & vinegar for different weeds...
ie add more for resistant weeds

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#6415216 - 08/18/16 10:37 PM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: fouzman]
huntwest Offline
Pro Tracker

Registered: 09/17/10
Posts: 1765
Loc: Albany
I use Pronto and mix 1 cup of Remedy witht to kill small woody plants. Pronto has surfactant in it. I usethis around fnces and tank batteries and it kills real well.

Top
#6415240 - 08/18/16 11:02 PM Re: Best Herbicide For Fence Lines [Re: jeffbird]
hoof n wings Offline
THF Celebrity

Registered: 05/03/10
Posts: 12691
Loc: Arlington/Brownwood
Anytime you have a prolonged exposure to chemicals, there is always a chance to have some type of cancer. Someone who uses Round Up once or twice a year isn't a prolonged exposure
Originally Posted By: jeffbird
Unless there is a compelling need, avoid Roundup. If you do handle it, make sure to use best practices to avoid skin contact or inhalation. There is evidence building to implicate it as increasing the risk of prostate cancer, which is already a significant risk for men and some, but lesser, evidence associating it with increases in breast cancer.

See the body of the text here (it does not copy and paste very well):

http://www.iarc.fr/en/media-centre/iarcnews/pdf/MonographVolume112.pdf




Here is some general info about cancer and other ag chemicals: http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/ahs-fact-sheet


What have researchers learned so far about farmers and cancer risk?

Most of the cancer research in the AHS has focused on pesticides, which are chemicals used to kill invasive insects, weeds, or small animals. In some cases, relationships between these pesticides and human cancer were examined for the first time in the AHS.

Thus far, researchers have evaluated more than 20 pesticides to determine whether the farmers who use them have increased risks of developing cancer. Some of these analyses have shown that people exposed to certain pesticides have an increased risk of developing certain cancers, but further research is needed to confirm these findings and to evaluate the potential mechanisms by which pesticides might influence cancer risk.

For example, a study from the AHS reported in 2009 that people who use the weed killer imazethapyr have increased risks of bladder cancer and colon cancer. Imazethapyr is in a class of chemicals known as aromatic amines. It was first used in the United States in 1989, and, since then, has been one of the most commonly used herbicides for killing weeds in soybean, dry bean, alfalfa, and other crop fields.

Studies in mice and rats led the EPA to classify imazethapyr as unlikely to be a human carcinogen. But, in the AHS, people with the highest cumulative lifetime exposure had more than twice the risk (137 percent increase in risk) of developing bladder cancer compared with those who had no exposure to the chemical. Similarly, the risk of colon cancer (mostly tumors in the proximal colon, where food enters during digestion) was nearly twice as high as normal (78 percent increased risk) among farmers who had the highest level of exposure compared with those who had no exposure to the chemical.

In addition, a condition called monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), which commonly precedes multiple myeloma, was found in blood samples of men in the AHS at twice the rate it was found in blood samples of men in Minnesota who were not part of the AHS cohort. This increased risk of MGUS was observed among men who used the chlorinated insecticide dieldrin, the fumigant mixture carbon-tetrachloride/carbon disulfide, the fungicide chlorothalonil, and possibly other pesticides. Now, a larger study within the AHS is looking more closely at the risk of MGUS with use of specific pesticides.

In 2011, AHS researchers reported an analysis of farmers who use the weed killer atrazine, which is a type of chemical known as a triazine. In this analysis, farmers who used atrazine the most often had a similar overall cancer risk to those who used atrazine the least often, but those with the highest exposures had a slightly increased risk of thyroid cancer. However, the number of cancer cases was too few for the finding to be considered conclusive.

Atrazine causes mammary tumors in rats but is not classified as a carcinogen in humans. Atrazine is an endocrine disruptor—meaning that it interferes with normal hormone signals in the body—as demonstrated in amphibians, birds, and rodents that have been exposed to it at high concentrations.

More information about what researchers have learned about cancer, other health problems, and risk factors among farmers is available in the AHS publications list.
_________________________
Originally Posted By: ImTheReasonDovesMourn
I'd ask him if he's pregnant. He missed a s__tload of periods.

Originally Posted By: Hancock
I'll take "things that look like a uterus" for $200 Alex.

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