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Max Online: 16728 @ 03/25/12 08:51 AM
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#6369769 - 07/14/16 10:20 PM Anyone feed medicated protein?
maximus_flavius Online   content
Bird Dog

Registered: 04/24/13
Posts: 385
I'm just wondering if anyone here feeds any medicated deer protein. Any thoughts or experiences would be appreciated.

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#6369784 - 07/14/16 10:35 PM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: maximus_flavius]
Mathp Offline
Bird Dog

Registered: 03/16/12
Posts: 454
Loc: Coppell Breckenridge, TX
I have not heard of medicated protein. Could you elaborate?
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#6369922 - 07/15/16 06:42 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: maximus_flavius]
don k Online   content
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 08/27/08
Posts: 9273
Loc: Bandera, Tx
I do to my Ibex. I have not heard of any medicated deer protein.
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http://www.ibexgoats.com/home.html

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#6369935 - 07/15/16 07:04 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: maximus_flavius]
redchevy Online   content
THF Celebrity

Registered: 10/25/04
Posts: 23393
Loc: Texas
All I know is what I have read.

I believe that LE offers a line with de-wormer in it. Need to have enough consumption that it is received in a viable dosage. Also believe the benefits are only really noticed if you have a real problem with unhealthy deer. Sure some others will have more info on it.
_________________________
It's hell eatin em live

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#6369946 - 07/15/16 07:15 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: maximus_flavius]
fouzman Offline
Pro Tracker

Registered: 08/09/10
Posts: 1007
Loc: Houston, TX
Not familiar with medicated protein. I've used Ivomec (Ivermectin) mixed with corn and fed out of troughs to worm whitetails.

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#6369949 - 07/15/16 07:22 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: maximus_flavius]
stxranchman Offline
Obie Juan Kenobi

Registered: 08/04/10
Posts: 52092
Depends on what your are calling "medicated". Not many if any medicated feed rations for whitetails can be made since those additives are not labeled for whitetail deer. If you were going to need to feed it you would need a vet prescription that you would take to the feed company to make your feed with. Most feed companies will have a minimum ton amount to be made(5 tons or more per order) to make the feed. They keep the prescription on file and can use it only for your feed. Not many feed companies that make pellet feeds will make medicated feeds if they are smaller company(1 pellet mill or textured feed mixing mill). Some animals will react negatively(sickness or death) to feed additives that are put in feed for another species. They have to take much more time to clean up and sanitize completely when switching rations. A company or feed mill that makes a regular or medicated cattle feed rations might not want to make special ration for a customer with horse for instance.
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#6369954 - 07/15/16 07:27 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: maximus_flavius]
Threelranch Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 10/20/14
Posts: 179
Loc: West tx
I have some of my guys that try to but from what i have saw the deer will not eat but about a third of the feed that it is put in .
I dont know if any of ya'll have read this but it is very helpful , i help some of the guys that wrote this so i know it is on the right path/
http://texnat.tamu.edu/files/2010/09/supplemental_feeding_deer.pdf

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#6369960 - 07/15/16 07:35 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: Threelranch]
stxranchman Offline
Obie Juan Kenobi

Registered: 08/04/10
Posts: 52092
Originally Posted By: Threelranch
I have some of my guys that try to but from what i have saw the deer will not eat but about a third of the feed that it is put in .
I dont know if any of ya'll have read this but it is very helpful , i help some of the guys that wrote this so i know it is on the right path/
http://texnat.tamu.edu/files/2010/09/supplemental_feeding_deer.pdf

That was from the second Beyond Dogma series. The first one was in San Angelo.
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#6369987 - 07/15/16 08:01 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: maximus_flavius]
Threelranch Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 10/20/14
Posts: 179
Loc: West tx
Not even going to enlighten you it's not worth it !

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#6369989 - 07/15/16 08:02 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: Threelranch]
stxranchman Offline
Obie Juan Kenobi

Registered: 08/04/10
Posts: 52092
Originally Posted By: Threelranch
Not even going to enlighten you it's not worth it !

I was at both of those.
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#6369997 - 07/15/16 08:11 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: maximus_flavius]
Threelranch Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 10/20/14
Posts: 179
Loc: West tx
Me too , i have never saw your name on anything but i'm not going to start a pissing match .I was only trying help fellow hunters out with a little input but i guess i wont do that anymore .

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#6370016 - 07/15/16 08:28 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: Threelranch]
stxranchman Offline
Obie Juan Kenobi

Registered: 08/04/10
Posts: 52092
Originally Posted By: Threelranch
Me too , i have never saw your name on anything but i'm not going to start a pissing match .I was only trying help fellow hunters out with a little input but i guess i wont do that anymore .

I am not either. I was stating that there was 2 of those seminars. Both were good seminars with great info for those that attended. I liked the first one more than the second one though, it was more informal with less people. Lot of that info given back then still holds true today also. After 20 yrs you still have 2 distinct sides/views on this.
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#6370109 - 07/15/16 09:40 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: maximus_flavius]
flounder Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 10/29/11
Posts: 174
Loc: 77518
growing big deer antlers with antibiotics

see ;

‘’The feed mill where I am currently getting my deer feed from can't believe how basic my mix is. I took in the antlers from this year and showed them and they just can't believe that such a basic mix could grow antlers like that. They said it is nothing more than a simple heifer feed, so you are correct xxxxxx. Same feed really.’’

Posted January 19 2010 - 03:02 PM

xxxxx, it will depend on what gram you are using. Currently I am using the 4 gram and I use about 1/2 LB of aereomycin per 50 LBS of feed. I use this just prior to, during, and for a couple days after any stressful events. Like testing time, severe changes in weather, and such. The vet has told me that it takes a few days for the blood levels to get high enough to help so it is good to start a little early. He also says that prolonged use can lead to failure of the liver or kidneys, I forget which one. That is why it should not be fed constantly and is best to use for no more than about 2 to 3 weeks and then off again for about 2 weeks.

NOTE: I am not a vet. Just passing on what I have been told.

Posted January 19 2010 - 03:11 PM

xxxxxxxxxxxxx....I have NOT been doing this...Where do you buy your aereomycin? I think I probably need to start doing this. Especially in the two pens I am refering too.

Thanks

Posted January 19 2010 - 03:16 PM

Thanks xxxxxx, the 4 gram is what I use also. Damien, I get it from our local Southern States dealer. xxxxx

Posted January 19 2010 - 04:54 PM

xxxxxxxxx said

xxxxxxxxxx....I have NOT been doing this...Where do you buy your aereomycin? I think I probably need to start doing this. Especially in the two pens I am refering too.

Thanks.

If you do it I would recommend doing it in all pens across the board during the same time line. I was getting mine at a Fleet Farm store. Lately I have just been getting it at the feed mill. Again check the strength you get. It comes in many concentrations. I have heard of 2 gram, 4 gram, 10 gram. The amount I spoke of is 4 gram.

Posted January 19 2010 - 05:22 PM

I will be going to the feed store in the next day or two, and will ask them for it. I will stick with the 4gram, and will do it in all my pens as well. Thanks for the help.

http://deerforums.org/index.php?/topic/1582-muddy-areas/

Posted January 20 2010 - 10:43 AM

xxxxxx said

Compare the analysis label of the cattle feed with your deer feed - bet it is closer than you think and is made for a ruminant anyway. If you want the medication, feed a batch of cattle mixed with your deer feed.

The feed mill where I am currently getting my deer feed from can't believe how basic my mix is. I took in the antlers from this year and showed them and they just can't believe that such a basic mix could grow antlers like that. They said it is nothing more than a simple heifer feed, so you are correct Robbie. Same feed really. But the thing is if you tell them your feeding cattle and something happens to your deer are they liable? I had an analysis run on my feed a couple months ago. It came back at 14% protein and 7% fat. I don't know maybe I should raise the protein some, but so far I seem to be growing good deer staying simple about it.

Trigger, I hate to say much more than I have about this. Seems like no one else wants to talk about it. Again I am not a vet and I have no expert knowledge about this stuff. I can only say I have been doing this for many years and have not had issues from it.

I use it for periods of about 2 weeks on and then 2 weeks off. I try and time the use of it so it coincides with changes in the weather such as cold snaps or warming trends, or freezing rain and such. I try and time it with up coming TB and Bruc testing dates. Or any event that will be added stress to the animals system.

My understanding is it provides a minimal amount of antibiotics in the blood stream to aid in fighting off sickness. So for instance if you have a storm with freezing rain move in it gives just a little boost to help them maybe fight off getting sick. It is not a cure all by no means.

Any stress event could lead to a sick deer because the immune system is zapped just enough to let it get sick.

It is supposed to aid in feed efficiency as well.

It does have a negative affect on the kidneys or liver though if used for too long of time. I think it is the kidneys. But again it depends on how long you use it and at what concentration it is being used.

I stick to what I know which is the 4 gram strength. If I can't get 4 gram I use 2 gram and adjust from there. But this comes in much stronger strengths as well. Educate your self and I highly recommend speaking with your vet before using it to be sure you have a good understanding of this stuff.

Posted January 20 2010 - 11:04 AM

xxxxxx - good point, but they aren't any more liable for you feeding it off lable than the drug manufacturers are for us using different meds off label for deer. We take that responsibility on ourselves, until such a time that there is more clinical data and things start being labeled for deer.

Posted January 20 2010 - 01:10 PM

I got my feed formula from a very reputable Top nationaly known breeder and we(he) feed CTC 4 gram crumbles 12.5 lbs. per 1000 year round. I had never thought about them building a resistance, but they have been on it over a year now with no sign of problems. I'm not saying it is how to do it just what we do.

Posted January 20 2010 - 06:52 PM

xxxxxx said

I got my feed formula from a very reputable Top nationaly known breeder and we(he) feed CTC 4 gram crumbles 12.5 lbs. per 1000 year round. I had never thought about them building a resistance, but they have been on it over a year now with no sign of problems. I'm not saying it is how to do it just what we do.

xxxx, Same holds true here in my area. even know some who have had deer 15+ yrs that even triple it or more acouple times a year or as they see fit.

http://deerforums.org/index.php?/topic/1582-muddy-areas/page-2’’

‘’The feed mill where I am currently getting my deer feed from can't believe how basic my mix is. I took in the antlers from this year and showed them and they just can't believe that such a basic mix could grow antlers like that. They said it is nothing more than a simple heifer feed, so you are correct Robbie. Same feed really.’’

Global trends in antimicrobial use in food animals Thomas P. Van Boeckela,1, Charles Browerb, Marius Gilbertc,d, Bryan T. Grenfella,e,f, Simon A. Levina,g,h,1, Timothy P. Robinsoni, Aude Teillanta,e, and Ramanan Laxminarayanb,e,j,1 Author Affiliations

aDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544; bCenter for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy, Washington, DC 20036; cUniversite Libre de Bruxelles, B1050 Brussels, Belgium; dFonds National de la Recherche Scientifique, B1000 Brussels, Belgium; ePrinceton Environmental Institute, Princeton, NJ 08544; fFogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892; gBeijer Institute of Ecological Economics, 10405 Stockholm, Sweden; hResources for the Future, Washington, DC 20036; iInternational Livestock Research Institute, 00100 Nairobi, Kenya; and jPublic Health Foundation of India, New Delhi 110070, India Contributed by Simon A. Levin, February 18, 2015 (sent for review November 21, 2014; reviewed by Delia Grace and Lance B. Price)

AbstractFree Full Text Authors & Info Figures SI Metrics Related Content Related Letter Related Commentary In This Issue PDF PDF + SI Significance Antimicrobials are used in livestock production to maintain health and productivity. These practices contribute to the spread of drug-resistant pathogens in both livestock and humans, posing a significant public health threat. We present the first global map (228 countries) of antibiotic consumption in livestock and conservatively estimate the total consumption in 2010 at 63,151 tons. We project that antimicrobial consumption will rise by 67% by 2030, and nearly double in Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa. This rise is likely to be driven by the growth in consumer demand for livestock products in middle-income countries and a shift to large-scale farms where antimicrobials are used routinely. Our findings call for initiatives to preserve antibiotic effectiveness while simultaneously ensuring food security in low- and lower-middle-income countries.

Next Section Abstract Demand for animal protein for human consumption is rising globally at an unprecedented rate. Modern animal production practices are associated with regular use of antimicrobials, potentially increasing selection pressure on bacteria to become resistant. Despite the significant potential consequences for antimicrobial resistance, there has been no quantitative measurement of global antimicrobial consumption by livestock. We address this gap by using Bayesian statistical models combining maps of livestock densities, economic projections of demand for meat products, and current estimates of antimicrobial consumption in high-income countries to map antimicrobial use in food animals for 2010 and 2030. We estimate that the global average annual consumption of antimicrobials per kilogram of animal produced was 45 mg⋅kg−1, 148 mg⋅kg−1, and 172 mg⋅kg−1 for cattle, chicken, and pigs, respectively. Starting from this baseline, we estimate that between 2010 and 2030, the global consumption of antimicrobials will increase by 67%, from 63,151 ± 1,560 tons to 105,596 ± 3,605 tons. Up to a third of the increase in consumption in livestock between 2010 and 2030 is imputable to shifting production practices in middle-income countries where extensive farming systems will be replaced by large-scale intensive farming operations that routinely use antimicrobials in subtherapeutic doses. For Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa, the increase in antimicrobial consumption will be 99%, up to seven times the projected population growth in this group of countries. Better understanding of the consequences of the uninhibited growth in veterinary antimicrobial consumption is needed to assess its potential effects on animal and human health.

http://www.pnas.org/content/112/18/5649.full

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK216502/

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/pubs/vet/amr-ram_backgrounder-documentation-eng.php

on one of my many neck surgeries, I contracted MRSA and it about killed me back in 2001. nasty stuff. then while looking up ruminant bse mad cow feed violations, I started noticing the constant, weekly, warning letters on antibiotic use in cattle. the cattle were in such a sad state for how they were being penned and raised, industry had to constantly feed them antibiotics and hormones. then they saw how well they grew, so decided just to use it as a constant regiment of daily feeding. now we have all become resistant to these antibiotics.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Discovery of first mcr-1 gene in E. coli bacteria found in a human in United States

http://staphmrsa.blogspot.com/2016/06/discovery-of-first-mcr-1-gene-in-e-coli.html

Thursday, September 18, 2014

New Executive Actions to Combat Antibiotic Resistance and Protect Public Health New Executive Actions to Combat Antibiotic Resistance and Protect Public Health

Lisa Monaco, Dr. John P. Holdren September 18, 2014 02:33 PM EDT Today, the Obama administration is announcing a comprehensive set of new federal actions to combat the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and protect public health. Additionally, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) is releasing a related report on Combating Antibiotic Resistance. The discovery of antibiotics in the early 20th century fundamentally transformed medicine; antibiotics now save millions of lives each year in the United States and around the world. Yet bacteria repeatedly exposed to the same antibiotics can become resistant to even the most potent drugs. These so-called antibiotic-resistant bacteria can present a serious threat to public health, national security, and the economy. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, antibiotic-resistant infections are associated with an additional 23,000 deaths and 2 million illnesses in the United States each year. The estimated annual impact of antibiotic-resistant infections on the national economy is $20 billion in excess direct health care costs, and as much as $35 billion in lost productivity from hospitalizations and sick days. Antibiotics are also critical to many modern medical interventions, including chemotherapy, surgery, dialysis, and organ transplantation. The Administration is ramping up our efforts to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria through a series of new actions including:

An Executive Order directing the federal government to work domestically and internationally to reduce the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and to help ensure the continued availability of effective treatments for bacterial infections. The Executive Order establishes a new interagency Task Force and Federal Advisory Council and includes calls for better monitoring of resistant infections, improved regulations governing antibiotic use, more robust research to develop new and effective methods for combating antibiotic resistance, and increased international cooperation to curb the global rise in resistant bacteria. Importantly, the Executive Order directs the new interagency Task Force to develop a five-year National Action Plan for implementing both the National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria, which includes goals, milestones, and assessment metrics for detecting, preventing, and controlling antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and to address the new PCAST report. A National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria, which articulates national goals, priorities, and specific objectives that provide an overarching framework for federal investments aimed at combating antibiotic resistance. These include: preventing the spread of resistant bacteria; strengthening national efforts to identify instances of antibiotic resistance; working to develop new antibiotics, therapies, and vaccines; and improving international collaboration on this issue. A new PCAST report entitled Combating Antibiotic Resistance, containing recommendations that were developed by PCAST in consultation with a diverse group of experts that span the human and veterinary sectors for actions that the federal government can take to strengthen the nation’s ability to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The launch of a $20 million prize sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, and the Food and Drug Administration to facilitate the development of a rapid diagnostic test to be used by health care providers to identify highly resistant bacterial infections at the point of patient care. These actions will help the nation contain the spread of resistant bacterial strains, manage existing antibiotics to prevent the development of new resistant strains, and help guarantee a steady pipeline of new, effective antibiotics and diagnostics. Most importantly, these actions will help save thousands of lives each year.


FACT SHEET: Obama Administration Takes Actions to Combat Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Lisa Monaco is Assistant to the President for Homeland Security & Counterterrorism. Dr. John P. Holdren is Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2014/09/1...rce=govdelivery

http://staphmrsa.blogspot.com/2014/09/new-executive-actions-to-combat.html

Sunday, September 22, 2013

Livestock Origin for a Human Pandemic Clone of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

http://staphmrsa.blogspot.com/2013/09/livestock-origin-for-human-pandemic.html

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013 THREAT REPORT

“We continue to promote the concept that, if an animal is sick, using antibiotics to treat that animal is obviously important,” said CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden. “We also know that there are specific situations in which the widespread use of antimicrobials in agriculture has resulted in an increase in resistant infections in humans.”

http://staphmrsa.blogspot.com/2013/09/antibiotic-resistance-threats-in-united.html here are a few samples of the warning letters ;

Our investigation also found that you hold animals under conditions that are so in adequate that medicated animals bearing potentially harmful drug residues are likely to enter the food supply.

http://staphmrsa.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2010-01-01T00:00:00-08:00&updated-max=2011-01-01T00:00:00-08:00&max-results=3

http://staphmrsa.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2008-01-01T00:00:00-08:00&updated-max=2009-01-01T00:00:00-08:00&max-results=6

http://staphmrsa.blogshttp://staphmrsa.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2008-01-01T00:00:00-08:00&updated-max=2009-01-01T00:00:00-08:00&max-results=6pot.com/

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0764 for Animal Feed Regulatory Program Standards Singeltary Comment Submission

https://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=FDA-2003-D-0432-0011

http://www.plosone.org/annotation/listThread.action?root=85351

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/comment?id=info:doi/10.1371/annotation/09676b86-bbc2-4c69-9032-c319f13a7ad0


kind regards, terry



Edited by flounder (07/15/16 09:41 AM)

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#6370174 - 07/15/16 10:34 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: maximus_flavius]
kdkane1971 Offline
Pro Tracker

Registered: 01/30/14
Posts: 1799
Loc: Mesopotamia
C'Mon man!

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#6370202 - 07/15/16 11:00 AM Re: Anyone feed medicated protein? [Re: maximus_flavius]
shedantler Offline
Outdoorsman

Registered: 09/24/08
Posts: 51
I have/do feed a pelletized medicated wormer purchased at L&E, I believe it is called "zoo and wildlife feed". I run it through my feeders a couple times in the early spring and again in the fall, after the first hard freeze. Basically treat the deer like I would when worming domesticated sheep/goats. Call your area L&E dealer and ask them about the "zoo and wildlife". It's a 3/16" pellet, and if memory serves me correctly, it's 16% protein. Good luck!

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