Main Menu
Advertisement
Affiliates
Advertisement
Newest Members
timlewi14, JamesThompson, Hunterwannabe, Zeb B, hillcountryredraider
60449 Registered Users
Top Posters
dogcatcher 77401
stxranchman 52092
RWH24 44568
rifleman 43783
BOBO the Clown 41094
BMD 40539
Big Orn 37484
txshntr 33684
bill oxner 32636
sig226fan (Rguns.com) 30571
facebook
Forum Stats
60449 Members
45 Forums
475896 Topics
6242936 Posts

Max Online: 16728 @ 03/25/12 08:51 AM
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#6155102 - 01/26/16 06:46 AM How do you know when to retire a great dog?
Ringman Online   content
Outdoorsman

Registered: 08/15/15
Posts: 75
Loc: East Texas
I've got an 8-1/2 year old GPS. Great dog, best of the bunch. The guys I hunt with call him superman. Very active dog and very young at heart/mind. Last time out he injured his front wrist. First significant injury other than thorns and a few cuts. Came back with a slight limp, went through his paws for thorns, etc. Next morning, wrist was swollen and he wouldn't put weight on it. I limited his movement for the next 48 hours - in the dog box, only on short lead for food/water/etc. Swelling went down and it appears he is back to his old self.
Question is, how long do you hunt a dog before retirement?
Any rule of thumb for age/condition?
I have no doubt that this dog would hunt himself to death if I let him, and maybe I should. Might be more cruel to retire him.
However, if any dog deserved a good retirement, he does. But I'm conflicted because he still has a ton of energy and unbelievable drive.

Top
#6155109 - 01/26/16 06:52 AM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: Ringman]
Nogalus Prairie Online   content
THF Celebrity

Registered: 11/22/10
Posts: 19268
Loc: Corsicana
I am going to hunt my GSP until she simply cannot physically do it anymore - she loves it too much any other way. Dogs don't know what "retire" means, IMO you are not doing them any favors not hunting them but just the opposite.

I am not a dog expert but that's my opinion.
_________________________
Originally Posted By: REALKILLER
That's the way I hunt don't know many that do. If a deer gets buy me I will try to run him down. Ive killed a bunch that way.



Top
#6155126 - 01/26/16 07:08 AM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: Ringman]
scalebuster Online   content
Pro Tracker

Registered: 11/25/10
Posts: 1906
I'd let him hunt himself to death or until he can't go anymore.

Top
#6155150 - 01/26/16 07:30 AM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: scalebuster]
1okiebirdhunter Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 08/31/08
Posts: 118
I have a 12 year old brittany that has the drive of a puppy, she will tell me when to quit.

Top
#6155156 - 01/26/16 07:34 AM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: Ringman]
bill oxner Online   content
THF Celebrity

Registered: 11/03/09
Posts: 32636
Loc: Richmond
All the above. They will let you know.
_________________________
Quail hunting is like walking into, and out of a beautiful painting all day long. Gene Hill




Top
#6155174 - 01/26/16 07:45 AM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: Ringman]
CCBIRDDOGMAN Online   content
THF Trophy Hunter

Registered: 11/16/07
Posts: 9287
Loc: CEDAR CREEK LAKE
Mine hunt till they cant. If they still have some go in them, I will take them.
_________________________

Top
#6155373 - 01/26/16 09:25 AM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: Ringman]
NorthTXbirdhunter Offline
Tracker

Registered: 03/17/11
Posts: 804
Loc: Rowlett, Texas
8.5 years old is not old for a dog in my opinion. He should be in his prime and know all the tricks and traits of birds. Enjoy him and let him enjoy doing what he loves to do best. Believe me, you will know it when you see it when it is time to put them up. It is hard to watch.

Top
#6155526 - 01/26/16 11:03 AM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: Ringman]
reeltexan Online   content
Veteran Tracker

Registered: 01/30/07
Posts: 2300
Loc: Ovilla - TEXAS
A few years ago, one of my buddies had a Brit that was coming to the end.

He was 13 then, he died at 14.
Doug would take him with us nearly to the end. Hunter was too old to stay up with another dog but Doug would let him take the field and hunt briefly then put him up. I know Hunter was happy with that.

Couldn't leave him at home.
Let them go as long as you can.
_________________________


"Count that day lost whose low, descending sun
Is not, in part, obscured by powder from my gun"
B. Spiller

Top
#6155554 - 01/26/16 11:14 AM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: Ringman]
HuntnFly67 Online   content
Extreme Tracker

Registered: 07/27/10
Posts: 4506
Clearly y'all are geared towards upland dogs - I get it. However, I was less bearish on my lab.

Ace started having seizures at 5 and by 7 they were occurring monthly with no pattern of onset and while taking meds. He had a seizure on a hunt just after a long water retrieve. That one scared me as I realized he could have one while in the field and at a point to where I could not get to him fast enough. There was no way I was going to watch my dog drown - I retired him that day and he only made it about a year before a major seizure shut him down for good.

I can see running an upland dog with good drive until they got no more 'go' or want.
_________________________
Originally Posted By: Grizz
If you attached NP's head to Scooter's body, would muscle memory cause him to beat himself to death?


Top
#6155659 - 01/26/16 11:59 AM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: Ringman]
bill oxner Online   content
THF Celebrity

Registered: 11/03/09
Posts: 32636
Loc: Richmond
Ginger was 12.

January 12, 1992: This was a hunt I'll treasure forever. I went out this morning with ET, and SK. We hunted the Goat pasture near Wharton. It was wet and the water was standing in the low places. The quail were on the ridges.I don't know how many coveys we got up. My guess is 12 to 14. Some ridges had two or three coveys in a small area. All the coveys were pointed. Some were divided finds that we originally thought was a point and a back.

Sis made a little loop to hunt by herself.

Ginger pointed three coveys while Sis was gone. Her second was a covey that brought old memories of South Texas hunts during her prime. It's not classic, but the covey was running and she stayed with them. She knew what she was doing and we knew what she was doing. She had a perfect location when the birds stopped. She went on to point several more times including a dead bird that we had shot out of our first covey.

Ginger was always the least trouble of any dog I've ever owned. Cathy sneaked her in several times to sleep with her over the holidays. She was a lady.

We knocked down 37 birds and picked up 34 birds.

Ginger died in her kennel after the hunt.
_________________________
Quail hunting is like walking into, and out of a beautiful painting all day long. Gene Hill




Top
#6155764 - 01/26/16 12:47 PM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: Ringman]
Cast Offline
THF Celebrity

Registered: 12/14/08
Posts: 14901
Loc: North Texas - God's Country
I like that story Bill.

We tried sneaking Cracker in the house but we got Oxnered pretty quick.
_________________________
Cast



I have a short attention spa

Top
#6155805 - 01/26/16 01:09 PM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: bill oxner]
Nogalus Prairie Online   content
THF Celebrity

Registered: 11/22/10
Posts: 19268
Loc: Corsicana
Originally Posted By: bill oxner
Ginger was 12.

January 12, 1992: This was a hunt I'll treasure forever. I went out this morning with ET, and SK. We hunted the Goat pasture near Wharton. It was wet and the water was standing in the low places. The quail were on the ridges.I don't know how many coveys we got up. My guess is 12 to 14. Some ridges had two or three coveys in a small area. All the coveys were pointed. Some were divided finds that we originally thought was a point and a back.

Sis made a little loop to hunt by herself.

Ginger pointed three coveys while Sis was gone. Her second was a covey that brought old memories of South Texas hunts during her prime. It's not classic, but the covey was running and she stayed with them. She knew what she was doing and we knew what she was doing. She had a perfect location when the birds stopped. She went on to point several more times including a dead bird that we had shot out of our first covey.

Ginger was always the least trouble of any dog I've ever owned. Cathy sneaked her in several times to sleep with her over the holidays. She was a lady.

We knocked down 37 birds and picked up 34 birds.

Ginger died in her kennel after the hunt.


It would be an answered prayer if Jenny went out like that.
_________________________
Originally Posted By: REALKILLER
That's the way I hunt don't know many that do. If a deer gets buy me I will try to run him down. Ive killed a bunch that way.



Top
#6155809 - 01/26/16 01:11 PM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: bill oxner]
Pointer Offline
Pro Tracker

Registered: 03/01/10
Posts: 1449
Loc: Bishop, Texas
Originally Posted By: bill oxner
Ginger was 12.

January 12, 1992: This was a hunt I'll treasure forever. I went out this morning with ET, and SK. We hunted the Goat pasture near Wharton. It was wet and the water was standing in the low places. The quail were on the ridges.I don't know how many coveys we got up. My guess is 12 to 14. Some ridges had two or three coveys in a small area. All the coveys were pointed. Some were divided finds that we originally thought was a point and a back.

Sis made a little loop to hunt by herself.

Ginger pointed three coveys while Sis was gone. Her second was a covey that brought old memories of South Texas hunts during her prime. It's not classic, but the covey was running and she stayed with them. She knew what she was doing and we knew what she was doing. She had a perfect location when the birds stopped. She went on to point several more times including a dead bird that we had shot out of our first covey.

Ginger was always the least trouble of any dog I've ever owned. Cathy sneaked her in several times to sleep with her over the holidays. She was a lady.

We knocked down 37 birds and picked up 34 birds.

Ginger died in her kennel after the hunt.


Now, that's the way it SHOULD be.


Edited by Pointer (01/26/16 01:12 PM)

Top
#6155828 - 01/26/16 01:20 PM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: Ringman]
reeltexan Online   content
Veteran Tracker

Registered: 01/30/07
Posts: 2300
Loc: Ovilla - TEXAS

A great way to go out.
Choked me up a little.
_________________________


"Count that day lost whose low, descending sun
Is not, in part, obscured by powder from my gun"
B. Spiller

Top
#6155908 - 01/26/16 01:49 PM Re: How do you know when to retire a great dog? [Re: Ringman]
NorthTXbirdhunter Offline
Tracker

Registered: 03/17/11
Posts: 804
Loc: Rowlett, Texas
Just this past Saturday, I was hunting with a good friend of mine who has a now 15 year (as of Dec.) setter. I gave this dog to my buddy who was out of my Dad's stock and bloodlines. Scamp has been a pretty decent birddog all of his days. Today, he can't hear or see over 4 ft. in front of his nose. But the nose still works.

Case in point (no pun intended)...
Saturday about mid day, we were hunting through a draw and my male dog hits a scent of birds on a cow trail in the draw. Scamp was puttering around in front of us and picks up on the birds as they were running in front of us and my dog. Those two dogs catwalked those birds for at least 200 yards across a farm road headed towards a canyon. Scamp got on the wrong side of a sheer gully from my young dog and the birds. In one of the greatest Kodak moments I will always have in my mind, I look to my right and Scamp was standing on cliff overlooking the gully and pointed at the birds across the ravine. I am now sorry that I didn't have at least my phone with me to take that picture. He was at least 50 yards away standing tall pointed with nothing but shear wall underneath him. The old rascal went tit for tat with the young dogs later that afternoon originating 6 covey finds on his own. He was just in a slow cow-trot all afternoon never over 30 yards from us making plenty of game. For as many times as I have cussed that dog in the past, I was as proud of him Saturday as any dog I have ever hunted. He got to sleep in the house on Saturday night. He brought back plenty of memories of his mother who was the finest bird dog that ever hit the ground in my opinion. I had a full brother and sister to Scamp that died at 13 & 14 years of age. They were all class bird dogs up until the day that they were slowed down....but not retired.


Edited by NorthTXbirdhunter (01/26/16 01:51 PM)

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >



© 2004-2016 OUTDOOR SITES NETWORK all rights reserved USA and Worldwide