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#5944431 - 09/24/15 11:34 AM TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing
flounder Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 10/29/11
Posts: 175
Loc: 77518
Thursday, September 24, 2015

TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing

*** I cannot stress enough to all of you, for the sake of your family and mine, before putting anything in the freezer, have those deer tested for CWD. ...terry

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2015/09/texas-hunters-asked-to-submit-samples.html




kind regards, terry

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#5944577 - 09/24/15 01:08 PM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: flounder]
jmh004 Offline
Bird Dog

Registered: 10/01/14
Posts: 387
Should we submit them to you?

I'm not going to live scared Terry. I'd rather die of CWD then live paranoid and afraid.

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#5944598 - 09/24/15 01:18 PM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: flounder]
BowMan59 Offline
Bird Dog

Registered: 07/21/11
Posts: 352
Cook it good and eat it! Goverment ploy to interfere and control your free right to hunt!
_________________________
I don't always hunt but if I'm not I'm fishing

Lone Star Trophy Ranch Comstock TX.
Where Dreams become Memories!
830-719-2469

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#5944627 - 09/24/15 01:32 PM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: flounder]
postoak Online   content
Veteran Tracker

Registered: 08/19/09
Posts: 2571
Loc: The Woodlands, Tx
Cooking won't destroy prions. Probably your best protection is to eat only young deer as it takes a while for prions to develop. I wouldn't eat any deer over 3 1/2, personally.
_________________________
There are two types of people, those who divide people into two types and those who don't.

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#5946184 - 09/25/15 11:31 AM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: BowMan59]
flounder Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 10/29/11
Posts: 175
Loc: 77518
Originally Posted By: LSTR
Cook it good and eat it! Goverment ploy to interfere and control your free right to hunt!


PRION 2015 CONFERENCE FT. COLLINS CWD RISK FACTORS TO HUMANS

*** LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACTS PRION 2015 CONFERENCE ***

O18

Zoonotic Potential of CWD Prions

Liuting Qing1, Ignazio Cali1,2, Jue Yuan1, Shenghai Huang3, Diane Kofskey1, Pierluigi Gambetti1, Wenquan Zou1, Qingzhong Kong1 1Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, 2Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy, 3Encore Health Resources, Houston, Texas, USA

*** These results indicate that the CWD prion has the potential to infect human CNS and peripheral lymphoid tissues and that there might be asymptomatic human carriers of CWD infection.

==================

***These results indicate that the CWD prion has the potential to infect human CNS and peripheral lymphoid tissues and that there might be asymptomatic human carriers of CWD infection.***

==================

P.105: RT-QuIC models trans-species prion transmission

Kristen Davenport, Davin Henderson, Candace Mathiason, and Edward Hoover Prion Research Center; Colorado State University; Fort Collins, CO USA

Conversely, FSE maintained sufficient BSE characteristics to more efficiently convert bovine rPrP than feline rPrP. Additionally, human rPrP was competent for conversion by CWD and fCWD.

***This insinuates that, at the level of protein:protein interactions, the barrier preventing transmission of CWD to humans is less robust than previously estimated.

================

***This insinuates that, at the level of protein:protein interactions, the barrier preventing transmission of CWD to humans is less robust than previously estimated.***

================

https://prion2015.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/programguide1.pdf

PRION2013 CONGRESSIONAL ABSTRACTS CWD

Sunday, August 25, 2013

HD.13: CWD infection in the spleen of humanized transgenic mice

Liuting Qing and Qingzhong Kong

Case Western Reserve University; Cleveland, OH USA

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a widespread prion disease in free-ranging and captive cervid species in North America, and there is evidence suggesting the existence of multiple CWD strains. The susceptibility of human CNS and peripheral organs to the various CWD prion strains remains largely unclear. Current literature suggests that the classical CWD strain is unlikely to infect human brain, but the potential for peripheral infection by CWD in humans is unknown. We detected protease-resistant PrpSc in the spleens of a few humanized transgenic mice that were intracerebrally inoculated with natural CWD isolates, but PrpSc was not detected in the brains of any of the CWD-inoculated mice. Our ongoing bioassays in humanized Tg mice indicate that intracerebral challenge with such PrpSc-positive humanized mouse spleen already led to prion disease in most animals. ***These results indicate that the CWD prion may have the potential to infect human peripheral lymphoid tissues.

Oral.15: Molecular barriers to zoonotic prion transmission: Comparison of the ability of sheep, cattle and deer prion disease isolates to convert normal human prion protein to its pathological isoform in a cell-free system

Marcelo A.Barria,1 Aru Balachandran,2 Masanori Morita,3 Tetsuyuki Kitamoto,4 Rona Barron,5 Jean Manson,5 Richard Kniqht,1 James W. lronside1 and Mark W. Head1

1National CJD Research and Surveillance Unit; Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences; School of Clinical Sciences; The University of Edinburgh; Edinburgh, UK; 2National and OIE Reference Laboratory for Scrapie and CWD; Canadian Food Inspection Agency; Ottawa Laboratory; Fallowfield. ON Canada; 3Infectious Pathogen Research Section; Central Research Laboratory; Japan Blood Products Organization; Kobe, Japan; 4Department of Neurological Science; Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine; Sendai. Japan; 5Neurobiology Division; The Roslin Institute and R(D)SVS; University of Edinburgh; Easter Bush; Midlothian; Edinburgh, UK

Background. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a known zoonotic prion disease, resulting in variant Creurzfeldt- Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans. In contrast, classical scrapie in sheep is thought to offer little or no danger to human health. However, a widening range of prion diseases have been recognized in cattle, sheep and deer. The risks posed by individual animal prion diseases to human health cannot be determined a priori and are difficult to assess empirically. The fundamemal event in prion disease pathogenesis is thought to be the seeded conversion of normal prion protein (PrPC) to its pathological isoform (PrPSc). Here we report the use of a rapid molecular conversion assay to test whether brain specimens from different animal prion diseases are capable of seeding the conversion of human PrPC ro PrPSc.

Material and Methods. Classical BSE (C-type BSE), H-type BSE, L-type BSE, classical scrapie, atypical scrapie, chronic wasting disease and vCJD brain homogenates were tested for their ability to seed conversion of human PrPC to PrPSc in protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) reactions. Newly formed human PrPSc was detected by protease digestion and western blotting using the antibody 3F4.

Results. C-type BSE and vCJD were found to efficiently convert PrPC to PrPSc. Scrapie failed to convert human PrPC to PrPSc. Of the other animal prion diseases tested only chronic wasting disease appeared to have the capability ro convert human PrPC to PrPSc. The results were consistent whether the human PrPC came from human brain, humanised transgenic mouse brain or from cultured human cells and the effect was more pronounced for PrPC with methionine at codon 129 compared with that with valine.

Conclusion. Our results show that none of the tested animal prion disease isolates are as efficient as C-type BSE and vCJD in converting human prion protein in this in vitro assay. ***However, they also show that there is no absolute barrier ro conversion of human prion protein in the case of chronic wasting disease.

PRION2013 CONGRESSIONAL ABSTRACTS CWD

Sunday, August 25, 2013

***Chronic Wasting Disease CWD risk factors, humans, domestic cats, blood, and mother to offspring transmission

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/08/prion2013-chronic-wasting-disease-cwd.html

From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.

Sent: Saturday, November 15, 2014 9:29 PM

To: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.

Subject: THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB DISEASE R. G. WILL 1984

THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB DISEASE

R. G. WILL

1984

*** The association between venison eating and risk of CJD shows similar pattern, with regular venison eating associated with a 9 FOLD INCREASE IN RISK OF CJD (p = 0.04). (SEE LINK IN REPORT HERE...TSS) PLUS, THE CDC DID NOT PUT THIS WARNING OUT FOR THE WELL BEING OF THE DEER AND ELK ;

snip...

http://web.archive.org/web/20050425210551/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m26/tab01.pdf

*** These results would seem to suggest that CWD does indeed have zoonotic potential, at least as judged by the compatibility of CWD prions and their human PrPC target. Furthermore, extrapolation from this simple in vitro assay suggests that if zoonotic CWD occurred, it would most likely effect those of the PRNP codon 129-MM genotype and that the PrPres type would be similar to that found in the most common subtype of sCJD (MM1).***

https://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/prion/article/28124/?nocache=112223249

*** The potential impact of prion diseases on human health was greatly magnified by the recognition that interspecies transfer of BSE to humans by beef ingestion resulted in vCJD. While changes in animal feed constituents and slaughter practices appear to have curtailed vCJD, there is concern that CWD of free-ranging deer and elk in the U.S. might also cross the species barrier. Thus, consuming venison could be a source of human prion disease. Whether BSE and CWD represent interspecies scrapie transfer or are newly arisen prion diseases is unknown. Therefore, the possibility of transmission of prion disease through other food animals cannot be ruled out. There is evidence that vCJD can be transmitted through blood transfusion. There is likely a pool of unknown size of asymptomatic individuals infected with vCJD, and there may be asymptomatic individuals infected with the CWD equivalent. These circumstances represent a potential threat to blood, blood products, and plasma supplies. ***

http://cdmrp.army.mil/prevfunded/nprp/NPRP_Summit_Final_Report.pdf


good luck !

Top
#5946188 - 09/25/15 11:31 AM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: flounder]
flounder Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 10/29/11
Posts: 175
Loc: 77518
*** IF CWD is not a risk factor for humans, then I guess the FDA et al recalled all this CWD tainted elk tenderloin (2009 Exotic Meats USA of San Antonio, TX) for the welfare and safety of the dead elk. ...tss

Exotic Meats USA Announces Urgent Statewide Recall of Elk Tenderloin Because It May Contain Meat Derived From An Elk Confirmed To Have Chronic Wasting Disease

Contact: Exotic Meats USA 1-800-680-4375

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE -- February 9, 2009 -- Exotic Meats USA of San Antonio, TX is initiating a voluntary recall of Elk Tenderloin because it may contain meat derived from an elk confirmed to have Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). The meat with production dates of December 29, 30 and 31, 2008 was purchased from Sierra Meat Company in Reno, NV. The infected elk came from Elk Farm LLC in Pine Island, MN and was among animals slaughtered and processed at USDA facility Noah’s Ark Processors LLC.

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a fatal brain and nervous system disease found in elk and deer. The disease is caused by an abnormally shaped protein called a prion, which can damage the brain and nerves of animals in the deer family. Currently, it is believed that the prion responsible for causing CWD in deer and elk is not capable of infecting humans who eat deer or elk contaminated with the prion, but the observation of animal-to-human transmission of other prion-mediated diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), has raised a theoretical concern regarding the transmission of CWD from deer or elk to humans. At the present time, FDA believes the risk of becoming ill from eating CWD-positive elk or deer meat is remote. However, FDA strongly advises consumers to return the product to the place of purchase, rather than disposing of it themselves, due to environmental concerns.

Exotic Meats USA purchased 1 case of Elk Tenderloins weighing 16.9 lbs. The Elk Tenderloin was sold from January 16 – 27, 2009. The Elk Tenderloins was packaged in individual vacuum packs weighing approximately 3 pounds each. A total of six packs of the Elk Tenderloins were sold to the public at the Exotic Meats USA retail store. Consumers who still have the Elk Tenderloins should return the product to Exotic Meats USA at 1003 NE Loop 410, San Antonio, TX 78209. Customers with concerns or questions about the Voluntary Elk Recall can call 1-800-680-4375. The safety of our customer has always been and always will be our number one priority.

Exotic Meats USA requests that for those customers who have products with the production dates in question, do not consume or sell them and return them to the point of purchase. Customers should return the product to the vendor. The vendor should return it to the distributor and the distributor should work with the state to decide upon how best to dispose. If the consumer is disposing of the product he/she should consult with the local state EPA office.

#

RSS Feed for FDA Recalls Information11 [what's this?12]

http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ArchiveRecalls/2009/ucm128543.htm

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Travel History, Hunting, and Venison Consumption Related to Prion Disease Exposure, 2006-2007 FoodNet Population Survey Journal of the American Dietetic Association Volume 111, Issue 6 , Pages 858-863, June 2011.

http://transmissiblespongiformencephalop...nd-venison.html

now, let’s see what the authors said about this casual link, personal communications years ago. see where it is stated NO STRONG evidence. so, does this mean there IS casual evidence ???? “Our conclusion stating that we found no strong evidence of CWD transmission to humans”

From: TSS (216-119-163-189.ipset45.wt.net)

Subject: CWD aka MAD DEER/ELK TO HUMANS ???

Date: September 30, 2002 at 7:06 am PST

From: "Belay, Ermias"

To: Cc: "Race, Richard (NIH)" ; ; "Belay, Ermias"

Sent: Monday, September 30, 2002 9:22 AM

Subject: RE: TO CDC AND NIH - PUB MED- 3 MORE DEATHS - CWD - YOUNG HUNTERS

Dear Sir/Madam,

In the Archives of Neurology you quoted (the abstract of which was attached to your email), we did not say CWD in humans will present like variant CJD. That assumption would be wrong. I encourage you to read the whole article and call me if you have questions or need more clarification (phone: 404-639-3091). Also, we do not claim that "no-one has ever been infected with prion disease from eating venison." Our conclusion stating that we found no strong evidence of CWD transmission to humans in the article you quoted or in any other forum is limited to the patients we investigated.

Ermias Belay, M.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

-----Original Message-----

From: Sent: Sunday, September 29, 2002 10:15 AM

To: rr26k@nih.gov; rrace@niaid.nih.gov; ebb8@CDC.GOV

Subject: TO CDC AND NIH - PUB MED- 3 MORE DEATHS - CWD - YOUNG HUNTERS

Sunday, November 10, 2002 6:26 PM ......snip........end..............TSS

Thursday, April 03, 2008

A prion disease of cervids: Chronic wasting disease 2008 1: Vet Res. 2008 Apr 3;39(4):41 A prion disease of cervids: Chronic wasting disease Sigurdson CJ.

snip...

*** twenty-seven CJD patients who regularly consumed venison were reported to the Surveillance Center***,

snip... full text ;

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/04/prion-disease-of-cervids-chronic.html

==============================

*** These results would seem to suggest that CWD does indeed have zoonotic potential, at least as judged by the compatibility of CWD prions and their human PrPC target. Furthermore, extrapolation from this simple in vitro assay suggests that if zoonotic CWD occurred, it would most likely effect those of the PRNP codon 129-MM genotype and that the PrPres type would be similar to that found in the most common subtype of sCJD (MM1).***

https://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/prion/article/28124/?nocache=112223249

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#5946196 - 09/25/15 11:36 AM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: BowMan59]
flounder Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 10/29/11
Posts: 175
Loc: 77518
Originally Posted By: LSTR
Cook it good and eat it! Goverment ploy to interfere and control your free right to hunt!



LMAO !

reminds me of ;

CJD9/10022

October 1994

Mr R.N. Elmhirst Chairman British Deer Farmers Association Holly Lodge Spencers Lane BerksWell Coventry CV7 7BZ

Dear Mr Elmhirst,

CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB DISEASE (CJD) SURVEILLANCE UNIT REPORT

Thank you for your recent letter concerning the publication of the third annual report from the CJD Surveillance Unit. I am sorry that you are dissatisfied with the way in which this report was published.

The Surveillance Unit is a completely independant outside body and the Department of Health is committed to publishing their reports as soon as they become available. In the circumstances it is not the practice to circulate the report for comment since the findings of the report would not be amended. In future we can ensure that the British Deer Farmers Association receives a copy of the report in advance of publication.

The Chief Medical Officer has undertaken to keep the public fully informed of the results of any research in respect of CJD. This report was entirely the work of the unit and was produced completely independantly of the the Department.

The statistical results reqarding the consumption of venison was put into perspective in the body of the report and was not mentioned at all in the press release. Media attention regarding this report was low key but gave a realistic presentation of the statistical findings of the Unit. This approach to publication was successful in that consumption of venison was highlighted only once by the media ie. in the News at one television proqramme.

I believe that a further statement about the report, or indeed statistical links between CJD and consumption of venison, would increase, and quite possibly give damaging credence, to the whole issue. From the low key media reports of which I am aware it seems unlikely that venison consumption will suffer adversely, if at all.

http://web.archive.org/web/20030511010117/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1994/10/00003001.pdf


Subject: THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB DISEASE R. G. WILL 1984

THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB DISEASE

R. G. WILL

1984

*** The association between venison eating and risk of CJD shows similar pattern, with regular venison eating associated with a 9 FOLD INCREASE IN RISK OF CJD (p = 0.04). (SEE LINK IN REPORT HERE...TSS) PLUS, THE CDC DID NOT PUT THIS WARNING OUT FOR THE WELL BEING OF THE DEER AND ELK ;

snip...

http://web.archive.org/web/20050425210551/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m26/tab01.pdf


save the industry at all cost, including human and animal health $$$


carry on...


terry

Top
#5946211 - 09/25/15 11:46 AM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: postoak]
flounder Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 10/29/11
Posts: 175
Loc: 77518
Originally Posted By: postoak
Cooking won't destroy prions. Probably your best protection is to eat only young deer as it takes a while for prions to develop. I wouldn't eat any deer over 3 1/2, personally.



Prion diseases occur in both humans and animals and are experimentally transmissible orally or by injection, thus providing a controllable model of other neurodegenerative protein misfolding diseases. In rodents and ruminants, prion disease has a slow course, lasting months to years. Although prion infectivity has been detected in brain tissue at 3 to 4 weeks postinfection (p.i.), the details of early prion replication in the brain are not well understood. Here we studied the localization and quantitation of PrPSc generation in vivo starting at 30 min postmicroinjection of scrapie into the brain. In C57BL mice at 3 days p.i., generation of new PrPSc was detected by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot assays, and at 7 days p.i., new generation was confirmed by real-time quaking-induced conversion assay.

snip...

The results in the present paper raise the question of why prion diseases are so slow (months to years), when PrPSc can begin replication rather rapidly after infection. Possibly, PrPSc needs to reach a certain minimum level before tissue damage occurs. There may also be particular CNS regions, such as the brainstem, where damage might have a more serious impact on clinical status. At later times, catabolism of PrPSc might be less effective because of aging or prior brain damage, leading to more rapid progression (52, 53).

Received 19 August 2015 Accepted 21 August 2015 Published 22 September 2015 Copyright © 2015 Chesebro et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license, which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

http://mbio.asm.org/content/6/5/e01419-15.full.pdf+html


Host Determinants of Prion Strain Diversity Independent of Prion Protein Genotype

Jenna Crowella, Andrew Hughsonb, Byron Caugheyb and Richard A. Bessena aThe Prion Research Center, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA bLaboratory of Persistent Viral Diseases, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Hamilton, Montana, USA K. L. Beemon, Editor + Author Affiliations

ABSTRACT Phenotypic diversity in prion diseases can be specified by prion strains in which biological traits are propagated through an epigenetic mechanism mediated by distinct PrPSc conformations. We investigated the role of host-dependent factors on phenotypic diversity of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in different host species that express the same prion protein gene (Prnp). Two CWD strains that have distinct biological, biochemical, and pathological features were identified in transgenic mice that express the Syrian golden hamster (SGH) Prnp. The CKY strain of CWD had a shorter incubation period than the WST strain of CWD, but after transmission to SGH, the incubation period of CKY CWD was ∼150 days longer than WST CWD. Limited proteinase K digestion revealed strain-specific PrPSc polypeptide patterns that were maintained in both hosts, but the solubility and conformational stability of PrPSc differed for the CWD strains in a host-dependent manner. WST CWD produced PrPSc amyloid plaques in the brain of the SGH that were partially insoluble and stable at a high concentration of protein denaturant. However, in transgenic mice, PrPSc from WST CWD did not assemble into plaques, was highly soluble, and had low conformational stability. Similar studies using the HY and DY strains of transmissible mink encephalopathy resulted in minor differences in prion biological and PrPSc properties between transgenic mice and SGH. These findings indicate that host-specific pathways that are independent of Prnp can alter the PrPSc conformation of certain prion strains, leading to changes in the biophysical properties of PrPSc, neuropathology, and clinical prion disease.

IMPORTANCE Prions are misfolded pathogenic proteins that cause neurodegeneration in humans and animals. Transmissible prion diseases exhibit a spectrum of disease phenotypes and the basis of this diversity is encoded in the structure of the pathogenic prion protein and propagated by an epigenetic mechanism. In the present study, we investigated prion diversity in two hosts species that express the same prion protein gene. While prior reports have demonstrated that prion strain properties are stable upon infection of the same host species and prion protein genotype, our findings indicate that certain prion strains can undergo dramatic changes in biological properties that are not dependent on the prion protein. Therefore, host factors independent of the prion protein can affect prion diversity. Understanding how host pathways can modify prion disease phenotypes may provide clues on how to alter prion formation and lead to treatments for prion, and other, human neurodegenerative diseases of protein misfolding.

FOOTNOTES Received 19 June 2015. Accepted 29 July 2015. Accepted manuscript posted online 5 August 2015. Address correspondence to Richard A. Bessen, Richard.Bessen@colostate.edu. Citation Crowell J, Hughson A, Caughey B, Bessen RA. 2015. Host determinants of prion strain diversity independent of prion protein genotype. J Virol 89:10427–10441. doi:10.1128/JVI.01586-15.

Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

http://jvi.asm.org/content/89/20/10427.abstract?etoc

http://transmissiblespongiformencephalop...ion-strain.html


However, since plants are such an important component of the environment and also a major source of food for many animal species, including humans, our results may have far-reaching implications for animal and human health. Currently, the perception of the risk for animal-to-human prion transmission has been mostly limited to consumption or exposure to contaminated meat; our results indicate that plants might also be an important vector of transmission that needs to be considered in risk assessment.

http://www.cell.com/cell-reports/pdfExtended/S2211-1247(15)00437-4

New studies on the heat resistance of hamster-adapted scrapie agent: Threshold survival after ashing at 600°C suggests an inorganic template of replication

The infectious agents responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) are notoriously resistant to most physical and chemical methods used for inactivating pathogens, including heat. It has long been recognized, for example, that boiling is ineffective and that higher temperatures are most efficient when combined with steam under pressure (i.e., autoclaving). As a means of decontamination, dry heat is used only at the extremely high temperatures achieved during incineration, usually in excess of 600°C. It has been assumed, without proof, that incineration totally inactivates the agents of TSE, whether of human or animal origin.

http://www.pnas.org/content/97/7/3418.full

Prion Infected Meat-and-Bone Meal Is Still Infectious after Biodiesel Production

Histochemical analysis of hamster brains inoculated with the solid residue showed typical spongiform degeneration and vacuolation. Re-inoculation of these brains into a new cohort of hamsters led to onset of clinical scrapie symptoms within 75 days, suggesting that the specific infectivity of the prion protein was not changed during the biodiesel process. The biodiesel reaction cannot be considered a viable prion decontamination method for MBM, although we observed increased survival time of hamsters and reduced infectivity greater than 6 log orders in the solid MBM residue. Furthermore, results from our study compare for the first time prion detection by Western Blot versus an infectivity bioassay for analysis of biodiesel reaction products. We could show that biochemical analysis alone is insufficient for detection of prion infectivity after a biodiesel process.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2493038/

Detection of protease-resistant cervid prion protein in water from a CWD-endemic area

The data presented here demonstrate that sPMCA can detect low levels of PrPCWD in the environment, corroborate previous biological and experimental data suggesting long term persistence of prions in the environment2,3 and imply that PrPCWD accumulation over time may contribute to transmission of CWD in areas where it has been endemic for decades. This work demonstrates the utility of sPMCA to evaluate other environmental water sources for PrPCWD, including smaller bodies of water such as vernal pools and wallows, where large numbers of cervids congregate and into which prions from infected animals may be shed and concentrated to infectious levels.

http://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/prion/NicholsPRION3-3.pdf

A Quantitative Assessment of the Amount of Prion Diverted to Category 1 Materials and Wastewater During Processing

Keywords:Abattoir;bovine spongiform encephalopathy;QRA;scrapie;TSE

In this article the development and parameterization of a quantitative assessment is described that estimates the amount of TSE infectivity that is present in a whole animal carcass (bovine spongiform encephalopathy [BSE] for cattle and classical/atypical scrapie for sheep and lambs) and the amounts that subsequently fall to the floor during processing at facilities that handle specified risk material (SRM). BSE in cattle was found to contain the most oral doses, with a mean of 9864 BO ID50s (310, 38840) in a whole carcass compared to a mean of 1851 OO ID50s (600, 4070) and 614 OO ID50s (155, 1509) for a sheep infected with classical and atypical scrapie, respectively. Lambs contained the least infectivity with a mean of 251 OO ID50s (83, 548) for classical scrapie and 1 OO ID50s (0.2, 2) for atypical scrapie. The highest amounts of infectivity falling to the floor and entering the drains from slaughtering a whole carcass at SRM facilities were found to be from cattle infected with BSE at rendering and large incineration facilities with 7.4 BO ID50s (0.1, 29), intermediate plants and small incinerators with a mean of 4.5 BO ID50s (0.1, 18), and collection centers, 3.6 BO ID50s (0.1, 14). The lowest amounts entering drains are from lambs infected with classical and atypical scrapie at intermediate plants and atypical scrapie at collection centers with a mean of 3 × 10−7 OO ID50s (2 × 10−8, 1 × 10−6) per carcass. The results of this model provide key inputs for the model in the companion paper published here.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1539-6924.2012.01922.x/abstract


terry

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#5946221 - 09/25/15 11:53 AM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: jmh004]
flounder Offline
Woodsman

Registered: 10/29/11
Posts: 175
Loc: 77518
Originally Posted By: jmh004
Should we submit them to you?

I'm not going to live scared Terry. I'd rather die of CWD then live paranoid and afraid.



that's fine, just don't go to the hospital, have surgery, donate blood or tissue, because I don't want my family and friends exposed to your stupidity, and possibly to die a horrible death to cjd. ...

*** CJD Video


http://zoomify.uzh.ch:8080/zoomify/videos/video-009/video-009.html



==============================

*** These results would seem to suggest that CWD does indeed have zoonotic potential, at least as judged by the compatibility of CWD prions and their human PrPC target. Furthermore, extrapolation from this simple in vitro assay suggests that if zoonotic CWD occurred, it would most likely effect those of the PRNP codon 129-MM genotype and that the PrPres type would be similar to that found in the most common subtype of sCJD (MM1).***

https://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/prion/article/28124/?nocache=112223249

*** The potential impact of prion diseases on human health was greatly magnified by the recognition that interspecies transfer of BSE to humans by beef ingestion resulted in vCJD. While changes in animal feed constituents and slaughter practices appear to have curtailed vCJD, there is concern that CWD of free-ranging deer and elk in the U.S. might also cross the species barrier. Thus, consuming venison could be a source of human prion disease. Whether BSE and CWD represent interspecies scrapie transfer or are newly arisen prion diseases is unknown. Therefore, the possibility of transmission of prion disease through other food animals cannot be ruled out. There is evidence that vCJD can be transmitted through blood transfusion. There is likely a pool of unknown size of asymptomatic individuals infected with vCJD, and there may be asymptomatic individuals infected with the CWD equivalent. These circumstances represent a potential threat to blood, blood products, and plasma supplies.

http://cdmrp.army.mil/prevfunded/nprp/NPRP_Summit_Final_Report.pdf



PRION 2015 ORAL AND POSTER CONGRESSIONAL ABSTRACTS

THANK YOU PRION 2015 TAYLOR & FRANCIS, Professor Chernoff, and Professor Aguzzi et al, for making these PRION 2015 Congressional Poster and Oral Abstracts available freely to the public. ...Terry S. Singeltary Sr.

O.05: Transmission of prions to primates after extended silent incubation periods: Implications for BSE and scrapie risk assessment in human populations

Emmanuel Comoy, Jacqueline Mikol, Valerie Durand, Sophie Luccantoni, Evelyne Correia, Nathalie Lescoutra, Capucine Dehen, and Jean-Philippe Deslys Atomic Energy Commission; Fontenay-aux-Roses, France

Prion diseases (PD) are the unique neurodegenerative proteinopathies reputed to be transmissible under field conditions since decades. The transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) to humans evidenced that an animal PD might be zoonotic under appropriate conditions. Contrarily, in the absence of obvious (epidemiological or experimental) elements supporting a transmission or genetic predispositions, PD, like the other proteinopathies, are reputed to occur spontaneously (atpical animal prion strains, sporadic CJD summing 80% of human prion cases). Non-human primate models provided the first evidences supporting the transmissibiity of human prion strains and the zoonotic potential of BSE. Among them, cynomolgus macaques brought major information for BSE risk assessment for human health (Chen, 2014), according to their phylogenetic proximity to humans and extended lifetime. We used this model to assess the zoonotic potential of other animal PD from bovine, ovine and cervid origins even after very long silent incubation periods. ***We recently observed the direct transmission of a natural classical scrapie isolate to macaque after a 10-year silent incubation period, with features similar to some reported for human cases of sporadic CJD, albeit requiring fourfold longe incubation than BSE. ***Scrapie, as recently evoked in humanized mice (Cassard, 2014), is the third potentially zoonotic PD (with BSE and L-type BSE), ***thus questioning the origin of human sporadic cases. We will present an updated panorama of our different transmission studies and discuss the implications of such extended incubation periods on risk assessment of animal PD for human health.

===============

***thus questioning the origin of human sporadic cases...

===============

https://prion2015.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/programguide1.pdf



carry on...



Edited by flounder (09/25/15 11:57 AM)

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#5946291 - 09/25/15 12:22 PM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: flounder]
bar-d Online   content
Tracker

Registered: 02/03/11
Posts: 810
Loc: Fisher County
Is this a statewide deal or certain areas?
_________________________
We live in the land of the free because it is the home of the brave. THANKS to all our military and LEO for the job you do.

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#5946419 - 09/25/15 01:40 PM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: flounder]
jmh004 Offline
Bird Dog

Registered: 10/01/14
Posts: 387
So flounder, are you suggesting when we get a positive test from a wild deer, that the state come in and kill every single wild deer in that county/area?

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#5946473 - 09/25/15 02:22 PM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: flounder]
Pitchfork Predator Offline
THF Celebrity

Registered: 01/25/13
Posts: 10873
Loc: Murphy, TX Dickens county
YOU HAVE A MUCH GREATER CHANCE OF DYING IN YOU CAR OR TRUCK EVERY TIME YOU DRIVE IT!

Are we all going to start riding bicycles now Terry?

I will be eating my venison and enjoying it. food
_________________________
Marc C. Helfrich
Retirement Planner

www.insured-wealth.com
469-323-8920

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#5946479 - 09/25/15 02:25 PM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: jmh004]
BOBO the Clown Online   content
decoy

Registered: 04/19/07
Posts: 41127
Loc: Metroplex
Originally Posted By: jmh004
So flounder, are you suggesting when we get a positive test from a wild deer, that the state come in and kill every single wild deer in that county/area?


In other words people in NM, CO, Wyoming etc have had brain destroying diseases for(at a minimum)the last 40 years, specifically from eating venison

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#5946527 - 09/25/15 02:59 PM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: flounder]
RaideRed Offline
Green Horn

Registered: 09/10/15
Posts: 1
I'd be interested in how to take a tissue sample and how to preserve it until you can submit it. That's a lot of info and not a lot of instructions for the hunter

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#5946621 - 09/25/15 03:57 PM Re: TEXAS Hunters Asked to Submit Samples for Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion Testing [Re: flounder]
8pointdrop Offline
Extreme Tracker

Registered: 12/16/11
Posts: 4730
Loc: My favorite place TEXAS
Terry again, you ruin these threads!!! We understand that the copy/paste works on your computer!!! Try actually typing something for a change.

They will get 0 samples from me until it's required by law. I'll eat every deer we kill and be just fine. Yes I'm still going to hunt old bucks and eat them too. Not eating deer over a certain age is ridiculous, and trying to prove CWD is on your lease has to be the stupidest thing I've ever heard. What do y'all think is going to happen if one of the samples comes back positive?

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