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#5698684 - 04/13/15 09:44 PM Question for the Knife Makers
Dink Dodger Online   content
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Registered: 09/14/05
Posts: 1117
Loc: Lewisville Tx
Have any of you guys ever made a strait razor? Is it much different than a knife blade
Just curious, I think they are pretty neat but would probably be afraid to use one.

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#5698884 - 04/14/15 05:59 AM Re: Question for the Knife Makers [Re: Dink Dodger]
Dave Davidson Offline
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Registered: 06/24/06
Posts: 4286
Loc: Hurst, Tx
Have to laugh about that. I bought a fairly expensive one because my Grandfather always used one. I pride myself on being able to sharpen but had it professionally honed. I've tried just about everything to sharpen/strop it. So far, the only thing I've done is wipe lather off my face.
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#5698912 - 04/14/15 06:45 AM Re: Question for the Knife Makers [Re: Dink Dodger]
bjankowski Online   content
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Registered: 04/22/10
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A straight razor is Hollow Ground. There are many different kinds of grinds.


1.Hollow grind — a knife blade which has been ground to create a characteristic concave, beveled cutting edge. This is characteristic of straight razors, used for shaving, and yields a very sharp but weak edge which requires stropping for maintenance.
2.Flat grind — The blade tapers all the way from the spine to the edge from both sides. A lot of metal is removed from the blade and is thus more difficult to grind, one factor that limits its commercial use. It sacrifices edge durability in favor of more sharpness. A true, flat ground knife having only a single bevel is somewhat of a rarity.
3.Sabre grind — Similar to a flat grind blade except that the bevel starts at about the middle of the blade, not the spine. Also named “Scandinavian Grind”, it produces a more lasting edge at the expense of some cutting ability and is typical of kitchen knives. Also sometimes referred to as a “V Grind”, made with strength in mind and found on tactical and military knives. The Finnish puukko is an example of a scandinavian ground knife.
4.Chisel grind — As on a chisel, only one side is ground (often at an edge angle of about 20 – 30°); the other remains flat. As many Japanese culinary knives tend to be chisel ground they are often sharper than a typical double bevelled Western culinary knife. (A chisel grind has only a single edge angle. If a sabre grind blade has the same edge angle as a chisel grind, it still has two edges and thus has twice the included angle.) Knives which are chisel ground come in left and right-handed varieties, depending upon which side is ground. Japanese knives feature subtle variations on the chisel grind: firstly, the back side of the blade is often concave, to reduce drag and adhesion so the food separates more cleanly; this feature is known as urasuki.[2] Secondly, the kanisaki deba, used for cutting crab and other shellfish, has the grind on the opposite side (left side angled for right-handed use), so that the meat is not cut when chopping the shell.[3]
5.Double bevel or compound bevel — A back bevel, similar to a sabre or flat grind, is put on the blade behind the edge bevel (the bevel which is the foremost cutting surface). This back bevel keeps the section of blade behind the edge thinner which improves cutting ability. Being less acute at the edge than a single bevel, sharpness is sacrificed for resilience: such a grind is much less prone to chipping or rolling than a single bevel blade. In practice, double bevels are common in a variety of edge angles and back bevel angles, and Western kitchen knives generally have a double bevel, with an edge angle of 14-16° (included angle of 28-32°) and a maximum of 40° as specified by International standard ISO 8442.1 ( knives for the preparation of food).
6.Convex grind — Rather than tapering with straight lines to the edge, the taper is curved, though in the opposite manner to a hollow grind. Such a shape keeps a lot of metal behind the edge making for a stronger edge while still allowing a good degree of sharpness. This grind can be used on axes and is sometimes called an axe grind. As the angle of the taper is constantly changing this type of grind requires some degree of skill to reproduce on a flat stone. Convex blades usually need to be made from thicker stock than other blades.[1] This is also known as hamaguriba in Japanese kitchen knives, both single and double beveled. Hamaguriba means “clam-shaped edge”.[citation needed]

It is possible to combine grinds or produce other variations. For example, some blades may be flat ground for much of the blade but be convex ground towards the edge.


Edited by bjankowski (04/14/15 06:47 AM)
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#5699041 - 04/14/15 08:23 AM Re: Question for the Knife Makers [Re: Dink Dodger]
Pitchfork Predator Online   content
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Registered: 01/25/13
Posts: 10864
Loc: Murphy, TX Dickens county
Great info Jank. up
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#5699438 - 04/14/15 11:41 AM Re: Question for the Knife Makers [Re: Dink Dodger]
BIGDOG1956 Online   content
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Registered: 10/26/09
Posts: 235
Thank for the good information.

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#5699507 - 04/14/15 12:10 PM Re: Question for the Knife Makers [Re: Dink Dodger]
Dink Dodger Online   content
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Registered: 09/14/05
Posts: 1117
Loc: Lewisville Tx
That's pretty interesting Bob, thanks for posting. I guess the answer to what is the best grind is what are you going to use it for.

Dave, that's pretty funny. At least your face has remained intact.

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#5700095 - 04/14/15 06:25 PM Re: Question for the Knife Makers [Re: Dink Dodger]
MikeC Online   content
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Registered: 08/09/05
Posts: 11737
Loc: Grayson County
I've never made one but I'm thinking with the equipment that I have the folding handle would be more of an issue to make than the blade would be.
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#5700164 - 04/14/15 07:03 PM Re: Question for the Knife Makers [Re: MikeC]
bjankowski Online   content
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Registered: 04/22/10
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Originally Posted By: MikeC
I've never made one but I'm thinking with the equipment that I have the folding handle would be more of an issue to make than the blade would be.


I saw one today somewhere Mike I don't remember where now (I'm old) and it had a different handle on it. It wasn't folding it just hand a round handle on it seemed easy to make but I'm sure very dangerous to put it away and finding in a drawer.. woot
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God is good always; always, God is good!

"If thou wilst a keen edge win
forge it thick and grind it thin"


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